Women’s Periods May Be Late After Coronavirus Vaccination, Study Suggests

1/7/2022 6:01:00 AM

Women’s periods may be a day late after they receive a coronavirus vaccine, a study found.

Your-Feed-Science, Menstruation

Women’s periods may be a day late after they receive a coronavirus vaccine, a study found.

An analysis of thousands of menstrual records offers support for anecdotal reports of erratic cycles after shots.

5:26 p.m. ETShortly after coronavirus vaccines were rolled out about a year ago, women started reporting erratic menstrual cycles after receiving the shots.Some said their periods were late. Others reported heavier bleeding than usual or painful bleeding. Some postmenopausal women who hadn’t had a period in years even said they had menstruated again.

A study published on Thursday foundthat women’s menstrual cycles didindeed change following vaccination against the coronavirus. The authors reported that women who were inoculated had slightly longer menstrual cycles after receiving the vaccine than those who were not vaccinated.

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I’m sorry - a DAY late? Most women would have absolutely no clue there was even a difference. Periods don’t happen like clockwork, guys. 🤷‍♂️ Why do we keep seeing lies over and over? 'A day late' in real life translates to erratic, irregular, painful bleeding for over 16 days that many of us, women, who never suffered from these symptoms before, have reported after vaccination. 'A day late' is simply a lie.

I’m glad someone is writing about this. Many women’s periods got messed up. Worth it though, in my opinion.

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Updated 5:26 p.Will Working From Home Last Forever? Experts Offer Insight Edelman’s team analyzed data from a birth control app called Natural Cycles, cleared by the Food and Drug Administration for women to track their menstrual cycles and tell when they’re most likely to become pregnant.like door handles and credit card machines than a tomato in the produce section .The state of Ohio on Wednesday reported 19,442 new cases of COVID-19.

m. ET Shortly after coronavirus vaccines were rolled out about a year ago, women started reporting erratic menstrual cycles after receiving the shots. Slight variations from month to month are normal, and stress, diet, even exercise can spur temporary changes. Some said their periods were late. This is the most likely way you'll contract the virus The CDC and WHO are in agreement that the primary way you could contract coronavirus is via person-to-person contact . Others reported heavier bleeding than usual or painful bleeding. Researchers tracked vaccinated women for three cycles before the shots and the immediate three cycles after, including the months they received a dose -- and compared them to unvaccinated women. Some postmenopausal women who hadn’t had a period in years even said they had menstruated again. This is the third straight day when the daily case count has been over 19,000.

A study published on Thursday found that women’s menstrual cycles did indeed change following vaccination against the coronavirus. A subset of 358 women who got both vaccine doses in the same menstrual cycle saw a slightly larger change to their next cycle length, on average two days. If these droplets land in another person's mouth or nose, or if they're inhaled into the lungs. The authors reported that women who were inoculated had slightly longer menstrual cycles after receiving the vaccine than those who were not vaccinated. Their periods themselves, which came almost a day later on average, were not prolonged, however, and the effect was transient, with cycle lengths bouncing back to normal within one or two months. Edelman said one theory is that when the immune system revs up at certain times in the cycle, “our body clock or what controls the menstrual cycle can have a hiccup. For example, someone with a 28-day menstrual cycle that starts with seven days of bleeding would still begin with a seven-day period, but the cycle would last 29 days. What does this mean? It means you still need to practice safety measures and good hygiene as well as avoid high-touch surfaces —especially when you're out in highly crowded places like grocery stores. The cycle ends when the next period starts and would revert to 28 days within a month or two. The findings provide “important new evidence underscoring that any impact of the COVID vaccines on menstruation is both minimal and temporary,” Dr.9% of Ohioans age 5 and up.

The delay was more pronounced in women who received both vaccine doses during the same menstrual cycle. These women had their periods two days later than usual, the researchers found. Months after the coronavirus vaccines were administered, researchers are looking into how the vaccine affected menstrual cycles. The study, in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology, is one of the first to support anecdotal reports from women that their menstrual cycles were off after vaccination, said Dr. Hugh Taylor, the chair of the department of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at Yale School of Medicine. ___ The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. “It validates that there is something real here,” said Dr. However, the total cases being reported recently likely are understated.

Taylor, who has heard about irregular cycles from his own patients. Copyright AP - Associated Press. At the same time, he added, the changes seen in the study were not significant and appeared to be transient. “I want to make sure we dissuade people from those untrue myths out there about fertility effects,” Dr. Taylor said. “A cycle or two where periods are thrown off may be annoying, but it’s not going to be harmful in a medical way. * Total reported hospitalizations: 98,730, up 453.

” He had a different message for postmenopausal women who experience vaginal bleeding or spotting, whether after vaccination or not, warning that they may have a serious medical condition and should be evaluated by a physician. One serious drawback of the study, which focused on U.S. residents, is that the sample is not nationally representative and cannot be generalized to the population at large. The data were provided by a company called Natural Cycles that makes an app to track fertility. Related coverage:.

Its users are more likely to be white and college educated than the U.S. population overall; they are also thinner than the average American woman — weight can affect menstruation — and do not use hormonal contraception. For women in their childbearing years, the findings should be reassuring, said Dr. Diana Bianchi, the director of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

(The National Institutes of Health’s Office of Research on Women’s Health and N.I.C.H.D.

helped fund the study, as well as related research projects at Boston University, Harvard Medical School, Johns Hopkins and Michigan State University.) .