Fear of China, Russia stokes support for Australian military might

29/06/2022 3:16:00 AM

Australians are in favour building up the military including acquiring nuclear-powered submarines, a poll finds.

Australians are in favour building up the military including acquiring nuclear-powered submarines, a poll finds.

Australians are in favour building up the military including acquiring nuclear-powered submarines, a poll finds.

Russia, China and the prospect of war over Taiwan are now seen as the biggest threats to Australia’s interests, the foreign policy think-tank has found, outranking climate change, COVID-19 and a global economic downturn.For the first time, a slim majority of Australians back making a military contribution to help the US defend Taiwan if China invades what it regards as a breakaway province.

AdvertisementThis year’s Lowy Poll found 75 per cent of Australians now viewed China as a likely military threat compared to 46 per cent in 2018., 88 per cent of people expressed alarm over the prospect of a Chinese military base in the region.In 2020, 55 per cent believed China was more of an economic partner.

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China has been bullying us They want us to be compliant to China's demands so they slapped trade bans n 200% wine tariff They ruined our wine n lobster biz We have 1mil mainlanders n they r pushing for China friendly stand Now they have votes

Farmers fear proposed government restrictions will 'decimate' businessAlthough Australia's agriculture industry is worth more than $60 billion, some Aussie farmers say their businesses could soon be decimated. 9News

Farmers fear proposed government restrictions will 'decimate' businessAlthough Australia's agriculture industry is worth more than $60 billion, some Aussie farmers say their businesses could soon be decimated. 9News

As Snowy Hydro ramps up production amid power crisis, nearby farmers fear discharge floodingFurther water releases from the Snowy Hydro and the Tumut River channel already at capacity have farmers downstream concerned, one saying there should have been better planning before now. Who can blame them with the poor management over the years. Have those responsible been stood down, or still running the show? It's frightening that no matter what damage government workers do they never lose their job. In the private sector you'd lose your job immediately. Farmers fear everything In 2021, Australia produced 74,679 gigawatt-hours of renewable energy, which accounted for 32.5% of electricity production. Australia produced 378.7 PJ of overall renewable energy (including renewable electricity) in 2018, which accounted for 6.2% of Australia's total energy use

Defence personnel fear seeking help for mental health, commission toldToday the Royal Commission into Defence and Veteran Suicide has been told of month-long wait times for access to mental health professionals and fears that presenting with mental health issues will hinder careers. fullmetaljacket ausgov politas militaryindustrialcomplex adfa adf australiandefenceforce mentalhealth meme StanleyKubrick movie army navy airforce Shocked! It’s pretty sad that the most important part of the human body is so under treated. It’s also a big reason why society has so many problems right now.

US, China and Russia focusing on the ArcticConcerns over the Arctic frontier are expected to be addressed at the NATO summit – following a military build-up in the region from the US, China and Russia.

War in Ukraine drives 'anxiety' as poll shows Australians feel less safe in the worldA poll by the Lowy Institute finds Australians are feeling more unsafe after Russia's invasion of Ukraine, while attitudes towards China continue to harden. Prove It .. !! A book A Story to approved .. !! Oh boy 👇 Yes the answer to feeling safer is more weapons to protect us from others with weapons. And when they get bigger weapons we need to get better weapons to feel safer from those. We need more weapons!!

to save article Share Fear of China and Russia is fuelling public support for Australia’s arms build up, with three-quarters of people viewing Beijing as a military threat, according to the Lowy Institute’s annual poll.But some of the farmers who spoke to A Current Affair said they rely on income from their tourism businesses, to run their farms and they currently operate under a home business.But some of the farmers who spoke to A Current Affair said they rely on income from their tourism businesses, to run their farms and they currently operate under a home business.Kevin Malone's family has farmed on the verdant banks of the Tumut River in southern New South Wales for 170 years, but he is deeply concerned that legacy is at risk due to the current management of the waterway.

Russia, China and the prospect of war over Taiwan are now seen as the biggest threats to Australia’s interests, the foreign policy think-tank has found, outranking climate change, COVID-19 and a global economic downturn. Chinese President Xi Jinping and Russian President Vladimir Putin have alarmed Australians. Schlachter owns Cedar Farm and welcomes hundreds of people a day to pick their own fruit in his orange orchard from the 3000 trees on the property. AP For the first time, a slim majority of Australians back making a military contribution to help the US defend Taiwan if China invades what it regards as a breakaway province. Jack Schlachter. Seventy per cent of Australians also back the acquisition of nuclear-powered submarines from the United States and United Kingdom under the AUKUS partnership. (A Current Affair) Jack Schlachter owns Cedar Farm. “This year’s poll reveals that Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has shaken Australians’ view of their own security and region,” Lowy Institute polling director Natasha Kassam said. Blowering Dam interacts closely with the storages in the Snowy Hydro scheme.

Advertisement “Australia’s new government will find support for more defence spending, tough policies towards China and Russia, and stronger engagement in our region and on the world stage. "When I found out, my head was spinning, my head was literally spinning for a day, I could not believe what I had seen," Schlachter said. "When I found out, my head was spinning, my head was literally spinning for a day, I could not believe what I had seen," Schlachter said.” As Chinese President Xi Jinping has become authoritarian and sought to pressure Australia with a series of trade sanctions, attacks in Communist Party media outlets or by Foreign Ministry officials and a ban on ministerial contact only recently ended, Australian attitudes towards China have hardened dramatically since 2017. This year’s Lowy Poll found 75 per cent of Australians now viewed China as a likely military threat compared to 46 per cent in 2018. At The Giving Farm you can pick your own berries and fresh fruit and vegetables. As China duchesses Pacific nations for security agreements, most notably Solomon Islands , 88 per cent of people expressed alarm over the prospect of a Chinese military base in the region. (A Current Affair) Missy Caufield from The Giving Farm. Despite China’s status as Australia’s biggest trading partner, only 33 per cent of Australians see China more as an economic partner, compared to 63 per cent who regard it as more of a military threat. (A Current Affair) READ MORE: Builders plead to renegotiate contracts while operating at a loss "It will decimate my business. "If they're going to increase the flows out of Blowering Dam we're going to get flooded.

Advertisement In 2020, 55 per cent believed China was more of an economic partner. Eighty-seven per cent of Australians do not trust China to act responsibly in world affairs, only topped by Russia at 94 per cent. "It will reduce my income by a substantial amount - 60 to 70 per cent," Schlachter said. "It will reduce my income by a substantial amount - 60 to 70 per cent," Schlachter said. In comparison, 87 per cent of people believe Japan and the UK will act responsibly, and 65 per cent the USA. Regard for Mr Xi has plummeted, with 82 per cent of respondents saying they did not trust him to do the right thing globally. "For us, it is about connecting people with how food is grown and how they can grow food at home as well and how animals are cared for," Missy Caufield from The Giving Farm said. Eleven per cent said they did trust him, a halving since 2020. Elizabeth Elvim operates a farm stay. The forecast fluctuations in the river's levels coincides with the imminent start of the new irrigation season — when water is released from the dam to help water crops in the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area in the state's south-west.

Only Russian president Putin and North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un are held in lower esteem. (A Current Affair) She said if they're only allowed to open to the public 10 days a year, it won't be viable. Alarm over Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has flowed through to a number of questions. Almost nine out of 10 people say they are concerned about China–Russia cooperation, while 92 per cent say the invasion is concerning. Elizabeth Elvim operates a farm stay and under the draft policy she will only be allowed to accommodate two people at a time. Elizabeth Elvim operates a farm stay and under the draft policy she will only be allowed to accommodate two people at a time. Just over 50 per cent say Australia should increase defence spending, while its membership of AUKUS and the Quad also made the country safer. Support for the US alliance is at a record high, even though Joe Biden’s standing has slipped with Australians. For alpaca farmer Sean Hooper, school visits won't be allowed.

The turmoil is fuelling insecurity, with only 53 per cent saying they felt safe, a 17-point fall from 2021. Alpaca farmer Sean Hooper. writes on politics, foreign affairs, defence and security from the Canberra press gallery. (A Current Affair) Sean Hooper's alpaca farm. Connect with .