Biden mulls sanctions on Putin, adding him to list of just 7 world leaders

1/14/2022 4:41:00 PM

'It wouldn't be significant because of any of the results,' former OFAC official Peter Kucik told Newsweek. 'It would be significant because of the fact that it's fairly unprecedented to sanction a leader of the stature of Putin.'

World, Vladimir Putin

'It wouldn't be significant because of any of the results,' former OFAC official Peter Kucik told Newsweek. 'It would be significant because of the fact that it's fairly unprecedented to sanction a leader of the stature of Putin.'

'It wouldn't be significant because of any of the results,' former OFAC official Peter Kucik told Newsweek. 'It would be significant because of the fact that it's fairly unprecedented to sanction a leader of the stature of Putin.'

The same year that Kim rose to power and began to reinforce stability, civil war erupted half a world away in Syria, prompting the U.S. to initiate the first of many sanctions against PresidentRussia's backing also helped keep Venezuelan President

Russian President Vladimir Putin meets with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad at the Kremlin in Moscow on September 13, 2021. Putin and his top officials have met with most of the world leaders on the U.S. Treasury Department's blacklist, and the Kremlin has been vocal over its opposition to Washington's use of economic restrictions abroad.

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Peter Kucik is a suck-up to all Russia's and Myanmar oligarchs. Mercury Public Affairs, LLC, where he currently works, has ended their contract w/ Sovcombank. But watch, these folks will be back feeding at the trough soon. Russia is not Iraq to play with BRING BACK MERCANTILISM

Russian officials to brief Putin on 'very disappointing' security talksU.S. ambassador to OSCE: 'The drumbeat of war is sounding loud and the rhetoric has gotten rather shrill.' Russia n's deputy foreign minister: 'I do not see reasons to sit down in the coming days.' Get the latest on this week's security talks ⤵ Russia seems to be looking for a war. We shouldn’t back down. Ever! Putin is a Cold War Relic incapable of change. If we go to war, we must go all in and free the Russian People. If Putin escalates, we must reciprocate. Let's Roll!! If we go to war, we must go all the way and free the Russian People.

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Biden to double free COVID tests, add N95s, to fight omicronWASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden announced Thursday that the government will double to 1 billion the rapid, at-home COVID-19 tests to be distributed... Unnecessary. The more healthy people that get Omicon, the faster we move to normal. Almost like those who control U.S. want to keep it that way.

Biden allies defeat sanctions bid on Russia-Germany gas pipelinePresident Biden's Democratic Party defeats Senate bid to impose immediate sanctions on a Russia n pipeline to Germany, fearing setting back diplomacy to prevent Moscow from invading Ukraine .

U.S. imposes sanctions after series of North Korean missile testsThe Biden administration on Wednesday imposed its first sanctions over North Korea’s weapons programs following a series of North Korean missile launches.

Biden imposes first sanctions over North Korea weapons program after missile testsThe Biden administration on Wednesday imposed its first sanctions over North Korea's weapons programs following a series of North Korean missile launches, including two since last week. Sanctions? Sticking to tactics from the 1940s? Carrot and stick approach stopped working long ago. Other countries live in constant fear. USA keeps sweeping the situation under the rug. This is why the USA was bought by China and is now falling apart from within.

Another leader on the list is Kim Jong Un of North Korea.Zachary Basu Putin with Defense Minister Sergei Shoygu.repeating his call for further sanctions on the gas pipeline to deter another Russian incursion.the highly transmissible omicron variant .

Kim took the helm as the third ruler in his family's dynasty in 2011, and was targeted by OFAC in 2016 over accusations of widespread human rights abuses. But it was his nuclear arsenal that brought him to the table two years later with Donald Trump as part of a prospective peace deal that ultimately unraveled.S. The same year that Kim rose to power and began to reinforce stability, civil war erupted half a world away in Syria, prompting the U.S.S." Why it matters: The diplomats wouldn't say what Russia would do if NATO declined to provide legal guarantees that it will not expand east or admit Ukraine as a member. to initiate the first of many sanctions against President Bashar al-Assad for his crackdown on protests that devolved into an insurgency.” Both vaccinated and unvaccinated people test positive for the virus, but Biden noted medical figures showing that people are far less likely to suffer serious illness and death if they’ve received a shot: “What happens after that could not be more different.

Putin's intervention in 2015, alongside support from Iran, helped restore Damascus' position, and regional powers that once shunned the Syrian leader have begun rebuilding ties. The big picture: More than 100,000 Russian troops have massed on the border with Ukraine, raising fears that Putin will further invade his vulnerable neighbor in an effort to stop Kyiv's drift to the West. Talks are taking to try to defuse a crisis triggered by the mass gathering of Russian troops near Ukraine, although the way forward remains unclear, and Moscow has warned the situation is "very dangerous. Russia's backing also helped keep Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro in power as the U.S. His comments echoed those of NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg, who warned after the meeting of the NATO-Russia Council on Wednesday that the alliance is preparing for the "real risk of a new armed conflict in Europe. sought to oust him with sanctions against him individually and his country in 2017. They should show again their firm stance to Putin," Vitrenko said. It withdrew recognition of his administration in 2019 in the wake of elections disputed by Washington and its partners.S.

The U.S-sponsored opposition has since fractured, and Maduro continues to rule. The drumbeat of war is sounding loud and the rhetoric has gotten rather shrill." Vitrenko said a package of additional sanctions should then be prepared if Russia is to invade Ukraine. Russian President Vladimir Putin meets with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad at the Kremlin in Moscow on September 13, 2021. Putin and his top officials have met with most of the world leaders on the U.S.S. The $11 billion project is owned by Russia's state-backed energy giant Gazprom and seeks to double the existing capacity of Nord Stream 1.

Treasury Department's blacklist, and the Kremlin has been vocal over its opposition to Washington's use of economic restrictions abroad. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said the U. MIKHAIL KLIMENTYEV/SPUTNIK/AFP/Getty Images As part of some of the longest-running sanctions by the U.S. has promised a written response to its demands, which Moscow will review before deciding the path forward.S., Cuba too is besieged by restrictions, forming an effective embargo on the country and its citizens, especially those in office. And while President Miguel Díaz-Canel is not individually targeted by OFAC, he remains essentially subject to the decades-long policy Cubans refer to as an"embargo" of the island.S.

Other world leaders have also been affected by sanctions not directly aimed at them, and some have family members that appear in the OFAC directory, barring them from travel to or doing business with the U. delegation at the various talks this week, told reporters on Wednesday that Russia's behavior toward Ukraine would play a key role in the fate of the gas pipeline.S. Sanctioning a head of state "is an outrageous measure that is comparable to breaking off relations," Peskov said, calling it an "extremely negative" gesture against the backdrop of ongoing negotiations. Given how long some of these sanctions programs have existed, debate continues to play out over just how effective such measures are in coercing changes in behavior considered undesirable by Washington. The Treasury Department did not respond to Newsweek Peter Kucik, who served as senior sanctions policy adviser at OFAC, told Newsweek that"sanctions work best when there's some way forward that allows for a way forward for both parties." Kucik, who today is the managing director at the Mercury public strategy firm, noted that sanctions have seen some success in the field of counter-narcotics.

But when it came to a case like Cuba, he said the goal of regime change provided little incentive for Havana to engage. He also cast doubt on the current approach of sanctions against Moscow, noting that many of the officials who initially called for such restrictions against Russia as a deterrent to Putin's moves in Ukraine in 2014 are the same people advocating the identical strategy today. "If the sanctions were working so well, why are we talking about more sanctions?" Kucik asked. Secretary of State Antony Blinken answered a similar question during an interview Thursday with NPR. "First, negatives are impossible to prove, so it may well be that the measures that were taken in the past actually deterred them from taking even further action and pursuing the aggression that they'd already committed," Blinken said.

"But we're not in 2014, we're in 2022 — that's what we're focused on," he added."And what I can tell you is the work that we're doing on that front goes well beyond steps that were taken in 2014." But Kucik felt it was the optics of the move that would have the furthest-reaching effects. He noted that, given that such a line"is rarely crossed" with any heads of state, doing so against a leader as powerful as Putin would be especially telling of the degree to which the U.S.

was willing to resort to unprecedented measures in the face of an unprecedented situation in Ukraine. "If this were to happen, it wouldn't be significant because of any of the results," Kucik said."It would be significant because of the fact that it's fairly unprecedented to sanction a leader of the stature of Putin." As for the results, however, he doubted they would force the Russian's hand. "If anybody thinks that sanctioning Putin is going to change the way that he governs Russia, I would urge some careful thought and consideration on that," Kucik said,"because I'm not sure that any of the sanctions imposed so far seem to have impacted his decisions dramatically.

" .