Nature, Mental Health, Environment

Nature, Mental Health

'Nature prescriptions' would be cheap way to improve country's mental health, study finds

'Nature prescriptions' would be cheap way to improve country's mental health, study finds

10/10/2019 10:06:00 AM

' Nature prescriptions' would be cheap way to improve country's mental health , study finds

For every £1 invested in projects that connect people to nature there is a £6.88 social return

1/15A newborn hippo, just days old, was keeping close to its mother in the shallows of Lake Kariba, Zimbabwe, when a large bull suddenly made a beeline for them. He chased the mother, then seized the calf in his huge gape, clearly intent on killingit. After trying to drown it, he tried to crush it to death. All the while, the distraught mother looked on. Infanticide among hippos is rare but may result from the stress caused through overcrowding when their day-resting pools dry out. Amale may also increase his reproductive chances by killing young that are not his, triggering females to go into oestrus, ready to mate with him. Male hippos are also aggressively territorial, and brutal fights are not uncommon. If they feel threatened by an accidental encounter, hippos will also attack and kill humans

Fresh Prince Of Bel Air returning to our screens - as a hard-hitting drama Trump has narcissistic personality disorder, says leading psychoanalyst Wear face masks and avoid kissing during sex

Adrian Hirschi/Wildlife Photographer of the Year2/15An ever-adaptable raccoon pokes her bandit-masked face out of a 1970s Ford Pinto on a deserted farm in Saskatchewan, CanadaJason Bantle/Wildlife Photographer of the Year3/15A gentoo penguin –the fastest underwater swimmer of all penguins –flees for its life as a leopard seal bursts out of the water

Eduardo Del Alamo/Wildlife Photographer of the Year4/15A juvenile jackfish peers out from inside a small jellyfish off Tahiti in French PolynesiaFabien Michenet/Wildlife Photographer of the Year5/15In a rare encounter, a lone male cheetah is set upon by a pack of African wilddogs in Zimanga Private Game Reserve, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Peter Haygarth/Wildlife Photographer of the Year6/15A kemp's ridley sea turtle with fishing equipment caught tight around its neck crawls on the littered beach of the Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge in AlabamaMatthew Ware/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

7/15A three-toed sloth sits in a cecropia tree Panama's Soberania National ParkCarlos Perez Naval/Wildlife Photographer of the Year8/15A weddell seal sleeps on the ice off Larsen Harbour in South GerogiaRalf Schneider/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

9/15A long-tailed tit nibbles on an icicle that hangs from a tree on the Japanese island of HokkaidoDiana Rebman/Wildlife Photographer of the Year10/15A young grey whale approaches a pair of hands reaching down from a tourist boat in San Ignacio Lagoon, on the coast of Mexico’s Baja California

Thomas P Peschak/Wildlife Photographer of the Year11/15In the clear water of the Red Sea, a shoal of bigeye trevally fish circle 80 feet down at the edge of the reefAlex Mustard/Wildlife Photographer of the Year12/15Slender stems of Eurasian watermilfoil, bearing whorls of soft, feathery leaves, reach for the sky from the bed of Lake Neuchâtel, Switzerland

Beirut blast: The footage that shows exactly what it's like to live through a disaster Coronavirus: Stricken Intu's Trafford Centre shops for £1.3bn buyer Trump calls Kamala Harris 'nasty' in record time and suggests she lied about smoking pot while listening to Snoop Dogg

Michel Roggo/Wildlife Photographer of the Year13/15Cocoon of a cyna moth pupa found on the wall of a public toilet in ChinaMinghui Yuan/Wildlife Photographer of the Year14/15Pinned to a white wall are the skins of rattlesnakes. Surrounding them are signed bloody handprints –triumphant marks of those who have skinned snakes at the annual rattlesnake round-up in Sweetwater, Texas. Each year tens of thousands of rattlesnakes are caught for this four‑day festival. In spring, wranglers use gasoline to flush the snakes out of their winter dens–apractice banned in many US states. They are kept in poor conditions before being brought to the festival and tossed into snake pits. They are then decapitated as entertainment for festival-goers, who pay to skin them. Proponents of the roundups claim they are needed to control the populations of venomous snakes to ensure the safety of people, pets and livestock. But opponents regard round-ups as an ecologically damaging, unsustainable and inhumane practice

Jo-Anne McArthur/Wildlife Photographer of the Year15/15On a night-time fieldtrip in the Peruvian Amazon rainforest, photographer Frank spotted this bizarre-looking weevil clinging to a fern stem. Its glazed eyes showed it was dead, and the three antennae-like projections growing out of its thorax were the ripe fruiting bodies of a ‘zombie fungus’. Spreading inside the weevil while it was alive, the parasitic fungus had taken control of its muscles and compelled it to climb. When it was at a suitable height –for the fungus –the weevil held fast to the stem. Fuelled by the weevil’s insides, the fungus then started to grow fruiting bodies topped by capsules that would release a multitude of tiny spores to infect new prey

Frank Deschandol/Wildlife Photographer of the Year1/15A newborn hippo, just days old, was keeping close to its mother in the shallows of Lake Kariba, Zimbabwe, when a large bull suddenly made a beeline for them. He chased the mother, then seized the calf in his huge gape, clearly intent on killingit. After trying to drown it, he tried to crush it to death. All the while, the distraught mother looked on. Infanticide among hippos is rare but may result from the stress caused through overcrowding when their day-resting pools dry out. Amale may also increase his reproductive chances by killing young that are not his, triggering females to go into oestrus, ready to mate with him. Male hippos are also aggressively territorial, and brutal fights are not uncommon. If they feel threatened by an accidental encounter, hippos will also attack and kill humans

Adrian Hirschi/Wildlife Photographer of the Year2/15An ever-adaptable raccoon pokes her bandit-masked face out of a 1970s Ford Pinto on a deserted farm in Saskatchewan, CanadaJason Bantle/Wildlife Photographer of the Year3/15A gentoo penguin –the fastest underwater swimmer of all penguins –flees for its life as a leopard seal bursts out of the water

Eduardo Del Alamo/Wildlife Photographer of the Year4/15A juvenile jackfish peers out from inside a small jellyfish off Tahiti in French PolynesiaFabien Michenet/Wildlife Photographer of the Year5/15In a rare encounter, a lone male cheetah is set upon by a pack of African wilddogs in Zimanga Private Game Reserve, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Peter Haygarth/Wildlife Photographer of the Year6/15A kemp's ridley sea turtle with fishing equipment caught tight around its neck crawls on the littered beach of the Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge in AlabamaMatthew Ware/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

What's going on in Belarus? Politicians fleeing, a questionable election and Europe's last dictator Will Kamala Harris be America's first black, female president? Twitter lets users ban others from commenting on their tweets

7/15A three-toed sloth sits in a cecropia tree Panama's Soberania National ParkCarlos Perez Naval/Wildlife Photographer of the Year8/15A weddell seal sleeps on the ice off Larsen Harbour in South GerogiaRalf Schneider/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

9/15A long-tailed tit nibbles on an icicle that hangs from a tree on the Japanese island of HokkaidoDiana Rebman/Wildlife Photographer of the Year10/15A young grey whale approaches a pair of hands reaching down from a tourist boat in San Ignacio Lagoon, on the coast of Mexico’s Baja California

Thomas P Peschak/Wildlife Photographer of the Year11/15In the clear water of the Red Sea, a shoal of bigeye trevally fish circle 80 feet down at the edge of the reefAlex Mustard/Wildlife Photographer of the Year12/15Slender stems of Eurasian watermilfoil, bearing whorls of soft, feathery leaves, reach for the sky from the bed of Lake Neuchâtel, Switzerland

Michel Roggo/Wildlife Photographer of the Year13/15Cocoon of a cyna moth pupa found on the wall of a public toilet in ChinaMinghui Yuan/Wildlife Photographer of the Year14/15Pinned to a white wall are the skins of rattlesnakes. Surrounding them are signed bloody handprints –triumphant marks of those who have skinned snakes at the annual rattlesnake round-up in Sweetwater, Texas. Each year tens of thousands of rattlesnakes are caught for this four‑day festival. In spring, wranglers use gasoline to flush the snakes out of their winter dens–apractice banned in many US states. They are kept in poor conditions before being brought to the festival and tossed into snake pits. They are then decapitated as entertainment for festival-goers, who pay to skin them. Proponents of the roundups claim they are needed to control the populations of venomous snakes to ensure the safety of people, pets and livestock. But opponents regard round-ups as an ecologically damaging, unsustainable and inhumane practice

Jo-Anne McArthur/Wildlife Photographer of the Year15/15On a night-time fieldtrip in the Peruvian Amazon rainforest, photographer Frank spotted this bizarre-looking weevil clinging to a fern stem. Its glazed eyes showed it was dead, and the three antennae-like projections growing out of its thorax were the ripe fruiting bodies of a ‘zombie fungus’. Spreading inside the weevil while it was alive, the parasitic fungus had taken control of its muscles and compelled it to climb. When it was at a suitable height –for the fungus –the weevil held fast to the stem. Fuelled by the weevil’s insides, the fungus then started to grow fruiting bodies topped by capsules that would release a multitude of tiny spores to infect new prey

Frank Deschandol/Wildlife Photographer of the YearMr Higgins said: “We want to see the concept of nature on prescription becoming a core part of the NHS mental well-being programmes.“This new report shows the enormous value of a natural health service. It’s also important to have more investment in Wildlife Trust outdoor volunteering which has been proven to improve mental, physical and social wellbeing.

“In addition, we need many more wild, natural places near to where people live and work. That way, green prescribing can be rolled-out everywhere Read more: The Independent »

Is really important that we stop trying to solve issues on the cheap and assuming a one size fits all solution to complex existential matters PlaceWellbeing Sigh. You’re all idiots. Spending an hour on a nature hike can do the same as antidepressants, people claiming natural therapies and weed are so far off the mark

I, myself use leeches. .drabagnall rhiannoncor WhatWorksWB so weed...

Sanders returns home after heart attack but will 'change the nature of campaign'‘I must confess, I was dumb,’ Sanders says outside home in Vermont, as campaign says he will be at next week’s debate And now his daughter in law died. Time to throw in the towel. Will fade away. Philosopher

Owning a dog may cut your risk of death by up to 65%, studies suggestOn the heels of two studies finding dog owners have better survival of heart attacks and strokes, the American Heart Association has stopped just short of recommending prescription pups. A Tories best friend david_mceneaney Ditch your car, YOU could save $2000 each year on fuel and help the planet with this e-bike!

Owning a dog may cut your risk of death by up to 65%, studies suggestOn the heels of two studies finding dog owners have better survival of heart attacks and strokes, the American Heart Association has stopped just short of recommending prescription pups. eleanor_hurt 🤷‍♀️ Paws for thought True, so true. They need us. Makes sense that we want to get through.

The Museum of Lost and Found Potential: putting faces to mental health statisticsAn exhibition of items from people with mental health issues hopes to ‘create some urgency’ for government action Guess which branch of mental illness she has? - The Museum of Lost and Found Potential: putting faces to mental health statistics

YouTuber highlights 'the importance of kindness'Disabled presenter Jessica Kellgren-Fozard's secrets of happiness on World Mental Health Day. Good day🌻 Jessica is wonderful ❤️ Hate speech! Wh do you promote such divisive rhetoric?

Health secretary Matt Hancock praises Sun for putting mental health centre stageHEALTH secretary Matt Hancock praised The Sun for putting mental health centre stage during last night’s Who Cares Wins awards. The Conservative MP, 41, said The Sun had lead the way when it …