Kidneys from genetically modified pig transplanted into brain dead human

It could be the answer to a global organ shortage

National, Inyourarea

1/21/2022 12:00:00 AM

It could be the answer to a global organ shortage

Experts now hope to carry out a clinical trial on living humans with serious kidney problems

According to the study, the kidneys continued working until 74 hours later.In a world first, two kidneys from a genetically modified pig have been transplanted into the body of a brain dead humanShe added: “The concept of being able to have an organ waiting on the shelf, waiting for the person who needs it, is just remarkable to think about – and exciting for that person.”

Covid-19 infection levels fall in three of four UK nationsThe human genes were added to the pig with the aim of helping to prevent rejection, both immediately and months or years down the line.The pig kidneys were placed in the exact anatomic locations used for human donor kidneys, with the same attachments to the renal artery, renal vein and the ureter that carries urine from the kidney to the bladder.

Read more: InYourArea.co.uk »

Politics live: Rishi Sunak to reveal more help with rising cost of living; Boris Johnson hopes to put partygate behind him after 'no smoking gun' in report

Politics Hub brings you the latest political news, insight and analysis from the Sky News team in Westminster. Rishi Sunak will announce more help with the rising cost of living, as the fallout continues from the release of the full Sue Gray report into partygate. Read more >>

Surgeons successfully transplant two kidneys from genetically modified pig into humanSurgeons have successfully transplanted two kidneys from a genetically modified pig into a human body, in what is a world first.The organs worked for more than three days during an experiment on a brain-dead patient, who was already on artificial life support with no prospect of recovery.It’s hoped the breakthrough could solve the organ shortage crisis and it follows similar surgery from earlier this month, when a man from the US became the first person in the world to get a pig heart transplant.David Bennett, 57, is said to be doing well post-op.Sign up to our newsletters here. ok Just want to say a very big thank you to Mrs lisamiabtc3 and her company platform for their transparency, I had doubts at first but seeing I got paid I deemed it necessary to share with the general public and to let them know that you can be truly trusted..thank you so much. Pigs are in trouble.

Woman who had heart and lungs transplant says stranger's gift saved her lifeVicki Lee was born with a hole in the heart, though it was undetected at birth. She had surgery last year thanks to a bereaved family selflessly allowing the rare op

Two men arrested in Birmingham and Manchester over Texas synagogue attackBREAKING: Malik Faisal Akram, 44, from Blackburn, was shot dead on Saturday after taking prisoners at the synagogue in Colleyville on Saturday.

Shock in Colombia over murder of 14-year-old indigenous activistBreiner David Cucuñame was shot dead while on patrol with the unarmed group Indigenous Guard Temporary shock. More killings in due time. 💔💔💔 rip Breiner David 😞😞 Max Hastings a respected person.

Beinn Eighe: Regenerating rainforests on UK oldest reserveWoodland on the Beinn Eighe reserve will be left to grow and expand without human interference.

Punk icon Hazel O'Connor in coma with 'bleed on the brain' after collapsePUNK icon Hazel O’Connor has been rushed to hospital after she collapsed at her home in southwest France. The 80s star was put into a coma after suffering “a bleeding on the brain”…

. The transplanted organs were able to carry out the functions of kidneys, scientists from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) in the US report. They successfully filtered blood, produced urine, and were not immediately rejected. According to the study, the kidneys continued working until 74 hours later. The transplant recipient was 57-year-old Jim Parsons, who was kept alive on a ventilator after a bike accident, and the researchers have decided to call the procedure the Parsons Model. The results demonstrate how this kind of transplantation from one species to another, known as xenotransplantation, could address a global organ shortage, the study’s lead surgeon, Dr Jayme Locke, said. In a world first, two kidneys from a genetically modified pig have been transplanted into the body of a brain dead human Dr Locke, director of the Comprehensive Transplant Institute in the UAB’s Department of Surgery, said: “This game-changing moment in the history of medicine represents a paradigm shift and a major milestone in the field of xenotransplantation, which is arguably the best solution to the organ shortage crisis. “We have bridged critical knowledge gaps and obtained the safety and feasibility data necessary to begin a clinical trial in living humans with end-stage kidney failure disease.” She added: “The concept of being able to have an organ waiting on the shelf, waiting for the person who needs it, is just remarkable to think about – and exciting for that person.” Selwyn Vickers, dean of the UAB Heersink School of Medicine and chief executive of the UAB Health System and UAB/Ascension St Vincent’s Alliance, said: “Today’s results are a remarkable achievement for humanity and advance xenotransplant into the clinical realm.” Read More Covid-19 infection levels fall in three of four UK nations Since the early 2000s, researchers have tried many times to genetically modify pigs through changes that reduce the chance of the transplant being rejected. Some 10 genes were changed in this latest donor pig. Four were disabled pig genes, also known as knockouts, and six were human genes that were cloned into the pigs, also known as knock-ins. The human genes were added to the pig with the aim of helping to prevent rejection, both immediately and months or years down the line. The natural lifespan of a pig is 30 years, they are easily bred, and can have organs of similar size to humans. The procedure was conducted in much the same way that a human kidney transplant is carried out and, before the surgery, the brain-dead recipient and donor animal even underwent a crossmatch compatibility test to see if they were a good tissue match. The pig kidneys were placed in the exact anatomic locations used for human donor kidneys, with the same attachments to the renal artery, renal vein and the ureter that carries urine from the kidney to the bladder. The human recipient received standard immune-suppression therapy used in human-to-human kidney transplants. Mr Parsons was a registered organ donor through Legacy of Hope, Alabama’s organ procurement organisation, but after his death his organs were not suitable for donation. His family allowed the UAB to keep him on a ventilator to keep his body functioning during the study. Mr Parsons’s ex-wife, Julie O’Hara, said: “Jim would have wanted to save as many people as he could with his death, and if he knew he could potentially save thousands and thousands of people by doing this, he would have had no hesitation. “Our dream is that no other person dies waiting for a kidney, and we know that Jim is very proud that his death could potentially bring so much hope to others.” Follow InYourArea's Facebook page for the latest national headlines In the US, the wait for a deceased donor kidney can be as long as five years and, in many states, it is closer to a decade. Almost 5,000 people per year die waiting for a kidney transplant. In the UK, more than 68,000 people are being treated for kidney failure, according to the charity Kidney Care UK. Around 3,000 kidney transplants take place annually but approximately 5,000 people are still waiting. The average wait for a transplant is about two-and-a-half years, and every day one patient will die while waiting. The new study is published in the American Journal of Transplantation. It comes weeks after medics in the US made history when they transplanted a pig heart into a human patient with terminal heart disease. Read More Allowing hospital visits must be an 'absolute priority' for trusts, Health Secretary says The animal had also been genetically engineered so its organs could survive in a human body. Fiona Loud, policy director at Kidney Care UK, told the PA news agency: “Right now thousands of kidney patients in the UK are waiting for the life-changing call of a transplant, so novel studies like this give a lot of hope, particularly to people who have been waiting years. “We need to keep perspective on such developments as there have been many abandoned studies over the years. “This one may present something more substantial because of developments in gene technology.” Get all the latest news, updates, things to do and more from your local