World to China: Time to step up on climate

Global poll shows strong consensus that Beijing needs to stop acting like a developing nation

2/9/2022 3:30:00 PM

Global poll shows strong consensus that Beijing needs to stop acting like a developing nation

Global poll shows strong consensus that Beijing needs to stop acting like a developing nation.

China has alienated a large swath of people around the world with its woeful climate performance, the latest sign of the country’s battered reputation as it rises to superpower status.political leadersRSVP hererelentless pressure campaignThe POLITICO Morning Consult Global Sustainability Poll surveyed 1,000 adults in 13 countries Dec. 16-22. The survey has a 3 percent margin of error.

,While the global frustration at China is clear, there is no easy fix."The Paris Agreement, is built upon the ‘common but differentiated responsibility’ principle — different nations should bear varying degree of responsibility to the climate problem, considering their historic emissions and income levels," Tsang said.

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28, 2019. | Olivia Zhang/AP Photo By 02/09/2022 04:30 AM EST Link Copied China has alienated a large swath of people around the world with its woeful climate performance, the latest sign of the country’s battered reputation as it rises to superpower status. UTC Updated Feb 7, 2022 at 2:36 p. A new POLITICO Morning Consult Sustainability Poll finds that majorities in every age group, income bracket, ideological affiliation and gender across 12 developed and developing countries agree that China needs to be held to the same standards as Western countries when it comes to reducing emissions and combating climate change. One third of all food produced globally, for example, is lost or wasted every year, and 80 per cent of that waste is caused by poorly executed processes such as supply chain inefficiencies, late deliveries and inaccurate planning. But while citizens express their frustration , political leaders around the world are reluctant to press China further — putting climate negotiators and public opinion at odds. UTC Blockchain. The problem is that, in global climate negotiations, countries set their own targets and timelines, and there's no real leverage to push them to do more than they choose. A third say they want to have fewer children because of it.

Too much too fast? Too little too slow? Join us on Feb. “The last five years at have been an incredible journey,” Baynham-Herd said in emailed comments.3 billion tonnes of CO 2 , making food waste the world’s third-biggest carbon emitter behind China and the United States. 10th at 9am ET for a virtual panel on a new POLITICO/Morning Consult Global Sustainability Poll focused on the world's climate frustrations.  RSVP here .” Prior to joining Blockchain. Climate commitments under the 2016 Paris Agreement are voluntary — largely at the insistence of the Obama administration. Imagine you’re responsible for shipping life-saving penicillin to South American hospitals, and orders are late or incorrect 40 per cent of the time. That means each country determines for itself how fast it intends to decarbonize its economy. He started his career in finance in London as a summer analyst with Wall Street giant JPMorgan. It may be that, as problems worsen, natural resources could become luxury items, something the rich and ultra-rich won't have to worry about.

Despite running a relentless pressure campaign urging China, the world’s biggest polluter, to do more on climate change, U.S. A report produced this year by the World Economic Forum shows that eight global supply-chain inefficiencies account for more than 50 per cent of all carbon emissions, with food alone representing about 25 per cent. and European governments accept that the transition will take longer in China than it will in the West. China's president, Xi Jinping, has said that his country , but is yet to specify how that goal will be reached. Those vague promises aren't enough for publics from Tokyo to London, and Sao Paulo to Cape Town. In 2022 companies will use data to influence their suppliers to be more sustainable. “[Gen Z sees the news] that not having a child limits the amount of carbon that they are personally responsible for .

The POLITICO Morning Consult Global Sustainability Poll surveyed 1,000 adults in 13 countries Dec. 16-22. The survey has a 3 percent margin of error. EcoVadis, which rates more than 75,000 companies on its corporate social responsibility and sustainable procurement policies, has found that business sustainability ratings average in the mid-40s out of 100, with procurement particularly lagging behind. Canadians over 65 are among the most skeptical people in the world when it comes to China’s climate change efforts: 91 percent of older Canadians think China should follow the same targets and timelines as wealthier countries when it comes to climate change; only three percent believe China is owed more flexibility to lag behind. Among demographics surveyed , Australian high-income earners are a close second and even more certain: 87 percent want China on the same policy track as the West; just two percent say China should be given a pass.” It’s clear that women are thinking about their own accountability: Nearly 40 percent said that it feels “irresponsible or unethical” to continue to bring more children into the world with the problems our planet is already facing.

One-third of Indians aged 45 to 64 think China should have more flexibility than richer nations, but that’s as robust as support gets for China. In 2022, companies will be increasingly differentiated by how sustainable they are. Among Western countries, Canada’s Bloc Quebecois voters are the most amenable to China’s view that it is still a developing country. But even then only 26 percent think China should have more flexibility than richer nations in addressing climate issues. While the global frustration at China is clear, there is no easy fix.. China's carbon emissions are now so high, that even “if China continues its current path, we will have trouble," said Li Shuo, the Beijing-based senior global policy adviser at Greenpeace East Asia. As Dr.

"But if China applies the standards of most of the western countries, we will have trouble too,” Li said. “Imagine President Xi announcing a shiny climate target but has absolutely no domestic policies to reach it — as Biden did." There is no legal framework to hold China to the Western timelines and standards demanded by citizens in the poll, said Byford Tsang of climate consutlancy E3G. "The Paris Agreement, is built upon the ‘common but differentiated responsibility’ principle — different nations should bear varying degree of responsibility to the climate problem, considering their historic emissions and income levels," Tsang said. Beijing thinks that countries that have historically pumped out the most carbon to the atmosphere, such as the U.

S. and EU countries, should bear the brunt of the cost in fixing the problem. It's a position that finds support in Brazil, India, South Africa and around 130 other countries. While China's per capita emissions remain at only around half that of American emissions (and, in cumulative terms, China's 235 million tons of carbon emissions lag the 416 million tons emitted by the U.S.

through history), the country's"breakneck speed of development in the last decade has made its position more untenable, and increasingly so as it grows richer," Tsang said. Perceptions of China's wealth may be changing quicker than the wealth itself. Majorities in every country surveyed — other than China — believe China is now a rich nation. China’s GDP per person, at around $10,000 , remains relatively modest compared to around $56,000 in the U.S.

But in aggregate terms, China may now have more resources than any country to affect change: it is the world's second-largest economy, with awesome planning capacity by dint of its authoritarian government, and home to more billionaires than any other country . Global consensus on prioritizing green infrastructure Making"infrastructure in your country more environmentally-friendly" was easily the most popular choice in all 13 countries surveyed, including among 41 percent of Chinese respondents and 32 percent of Americans. That compares to just 4 percent in China and 5 percent in the U.S. prioritizing an immediate ban on gasoline-powered vehicles.

What Chinese citizens think about climate change Chinese citizens aged 65 and over are among the most concerned in the world about climate change. But they’re not willing to pay to alter the trajectory, reflecting a Chinese tradition of young generations supporting their elderly family members. Forty-three percent of those over 65 said they are “very concerned” about climate change — triple the rate of concern among 18- to 65-year-old Chinese. But while every older Chinese respondent who gave an opinion — 79 percent of those surveyed — agreed that their generation bore either “a lot” or “some” responsibility for climate change, all 79 percent insisted “the next generation” should pay “a lot” of “some” of the costs of green transition. Zero respondents aged over 65 were willing to agree that “the next generation” should pay “not too much” or “none at all.

” Women in China are more than twice as likely as men (21 percent compared to nine percent) to say they are “very concerned” about climate change, while middle and low-income earners are slightly more likely to be concerned than high-income earners in China. China broadly shares the views of citizens in other countries when it comes to what climate actions should be prioritized. Chinese respondents prefer environmentally-friendly infrastructure investments ahead of banning gasoline-powered cars and coal in the next 20 years, for example. Mandating vehicle electrification by 2040 wins the support of only about one in three Chinese. Notably, China was the only country surveyed where a majority did not perceive a rise in natural disasters and extreme weather events.

Phelim Kine and Karl Mathesian contributed to this report. Morning Consult is a global data intelligence company, delivering insights on what people think in real time by surveying tens of thousands across the globe every single day . .