Barry Black, Bill Clintons, Donald Trumps, Lev Parnas, Michael Stenger, Rudolph Giuliani, Susan Collins, Legal Trial, Us Democratic Party, Mcconnell, Schumer, Lisa Murkowski, Adam Schiff, John Roberts, U.S. Republican Party, United States Senate

Barry Black, Bill Clintons

Trump impeachment trial live updates: Heated arguments over McConnell's Senate rules resolution

The Senate impeachment trial of President Trump begins with a fight over the fairness of proposed rules to govern the proceeding.

21.1.2020

.jonkarl: 'The president wants to see this Senate trial as something he can point to and say, that is vindication'—and wants trial to proceed quickly so he can return 'in a moment of triumph' at his State of the Union address on February 4th.

The Senate impeachment trial of President Trump begins with a fight over the fairness of proposed rules to govern the proceeding.

January 21, 2020, 7:55 PM 31 min read Senate impeachment trial of President Trump to resume soon: ABC News Live 24/7 coverage of breaking news and live events ABC News - Senate debates rules resolution that now calls for 24 hours of arguments over three -- not two -- days - Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says 'finally, some fairness' in opening remarks - Key GOP senators say they're on board with McConnell's proposed rules - House managers complain about proposed trial rules, claiming McConnell is orchestrating a cover-up - Proceedings formally get underway when Chief Justice John Roberts gavels the trial into session - McConnell lays out resolution on rules for the trial - Each side gets up to one hour of debate time on the resolution - Schumer expected to offer an amendment regarding witnesses and documents, possible Senate could go into closed session - Two more hours of debate expected before a possible vote 2:39 p.m. President Trump's lawyers argue the Democrats failed to pursue their case in the courts President Trump's personal attorney Jay Sekulow begins his argument by slamming the process in the House impeachment inquiry. "And what we just heard from manager Schiff, courts have no role, privileges don't apply, what happened in the past we should just ignore. In fact, manager Schiff just said try to summarize my colleagues defense of the president," Sekulow says. President Donald Trump's personal attorney Jay Sekulow speaks during the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., Jan. 21, 2020. President Donald Trump's personal attorney Jay Sekulow speaks during the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., Jan. 21, 2020. ABC News "He said not in those words of course, which is not the first time Mr. Schiff has put words into transcripts that did not exist. Mr. Schiff also talked about a trifecta," Sekulow says. "I'll give you a trifecta. During the proceedings that took place before the Judiciary Committee, the president was denied the right to cross-examine witnesses. The president was denied the right to access evidence. And the president was denied the right to have counsel present at hearings. This is a trifecta that violates the Constitution of the United States. Mr. Schiff did say the courts really don't have a role in this. Executive privilege, why would that matter? It matters because it is based on the Constitution of the United States," Sekulow continues. The president and his counsel could not participate in person during the depositions that House Intelligence, Judiciary and Oversight committees held but once the hearings moved to the House Judiciary Committee, the White House and the president chose not to participate even though they were invited to present a defense. Pat Cipollone also says that Schiff was keeping Republicans out of the impeachment depositions. That is not true. Republicans on the committees mentioned participated in the depositions. Sekulow argues that the only reason we are here is because Democrats want the president removed from office. "What are we dealing with here? Why are we here? Are we here because of a phone call? Or are we before a great body because, since the president was sworn into office, there was a desire to see him removed." He says that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi expressed her impatience and contempt for the proceedings and waiting for the courts to rule when she said"we cannot be at the mercy of the courts." "That is why we have courts ... to determine constitutional issues of this magnitude," he said, although it should be noted that the administration has argued that the courts should not have a role here," he says. -ABC's Katherine Faulders 2:13 p.m. GOP's Collins pressed to have arguments take place over 3 -- not 2 -- days ABC's Trish Turner on Capitol Hill reports aides to moderate GOP Sen. Susan Collins say she and others raised concerns about trying to fit the 24 hours of opening statements in two days under the proposed rules and the admission of the House transcript of the evidence into the Senate record. Her position has been that the trial should follow the Clinton model as much as possible, the aides say. She thinks these changes are a significant improvement, they say. 2:08 p.m. Trump tweets from Switzerland President Trump appears to be monitoring the Senate trial from his trip to Davos, Switzerland, to attend the World Economic Forum, reports ABC's Elizabeth Thomas. A few minutes after he left a dinner with Global Chief Executive Officers, the last scheduled event of the day in Davos, Trump tweeted,"READ THE TRANSCRIPTS!" -- one of his favorite defenses, as he has often said before, referring to his calls with Ukraine's president -- calls which he calls"perfect." 1:34 p.m. Schiff says Trump is arguing there is nothing Congress can do about his conduct House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff makes his first remarks in Tuesday's session, speaking on behalf of the House impeachment managers against McConnell's resolution. House impeachment manager Rep. Adam Schiff speaks during impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol, Jan. 21, 2020, in Washington, D.C. House impeachment manager Rep. Adam Schiff speaks during impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol, Jan. 21, 2020, in Washington, D.C. ABC News He says Trump is arguing that there is nothing Congress can do about the behavior in question in the trial and the trial won't be fair if both sides are blocked from introducing new evidence. "If a president can obstruct his own investigation, if he can effectively nullify a power, the Constitution gives solely to Congress and indeed the ultimate power, the ultimate power the Constitution gives to prevent presidential misconduct, then the president places himself beyond accountability, above the law," Schiff says. "It makes him a monarch, the very evil which against our Constitution and the balance of powers the Constitution was laid out to guard against," he says. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts swears in the final senator, James Inhofe, as he presides over the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump in the Senate Chamber, Jan. 21, 2020, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts swears in the final senator, James Inhofe, as he presides over the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump in the Senate Chamber, Jan. 21, 2020, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. ABC News Schiff continues to focus on the ability for the Senate to immediately hear from witnesses and receive additional documents before continuing with the trial. “If the Senate votes to deprive itself of witnesses and documents the opening statements will be the end of the trial,” Schiff says. Earlier on the Senate floor, McConnell said votes on subpoenas and witnesses should not happen until later in the trial, as outlined in the procedural resolution his office announced Monday. Most Americans, Schiff said, don’t believe there will be a fair trial and that Trump will be acquitted. “Let’s prove them wrong! How? By convicting the president? No.” Schiff says. “By letting the House prove its case." Schiff makes the case for additional evidence and witnesses in the Senate trial, with the help of the president's own words. While speaking on the Senate floor, Schiff plays several clips of President Trump. The first shows Trump saying he wants witnesses, and another featuring the President saying Article II of the Constitution gives him the right to do"whatever I want." "The innocent do not act this way," Schiff says. This trial, he added, should not"reward" the president's obstruction by letting him determine what evidence is seen by the Senate. He also pushed back on the criticism that the House had not exhausted its legal efforts in court to obtain access to witnesses and evidence. Continuing to mount a legal case, Schiff argues, would encourage Trump to"endlessly litigate the matter in court on every judgment," essentially filibustering the impeachment process. Schiff spoke after White House counsel Pat Cipollone spoke briefly on behalf of President Trump, in support of the rules and calling on the Senate to acquit the president as soon as possible. White House counsel Pat Cipollone speaks during the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., Jan. 21, 2020. White House counsel Pat Cipollone speaks during the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., Jan. 21, 2020. ABC News 1:20 p.m. Senate considers rules resolution that now calls for 24 hours of arguments over 3 days With Chief Justice John Roberts presiding, the Senate begins considering the rules resolution proposed by McConnell that Democrats strongly object to as unfair. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts speaks during the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., Jan. 21, 2020. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts speaks during the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., Jan. 21, 2020. ABC News The trial resumed at 1:17 p.m. after being scheduled to resume at 1 p.m. In a major change, the proposed rules would now allow each side to make their case in a total of 24 hours over three -- not two -- days. It also means the whole trial will likely take longer. McConnell's team is expected to confirm that evidence from the House inquiry will now be admitted but not new evidence obtained since the House vote to impeach the president on Dec. 18. Someone can OBJECT to that evidence being admitted, according to the proposed change. 12:35 p.m. McConnell says 'finally, some fairness' in opening remarks Majority Leader McConnell begins his opening remarks -- before the formal start of the trial at 1 p.m. -- by saying,"finally, some fairness." Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell speaks on the floor of the Senate, at the opening of the first day of arguments in the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., Jan.21, 2020. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell speaks on the floor of the Senate, at the opening of the first day of arguments in the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., Jan.21, 2020. ABC News "This is the fair road map for out trial," he says of the proposed rules resolution he will soon formally introduce, saying it will bring the"clarity and fairness that everyone deserves." Minority Leader Schumer calls McConnell's rules"completely partisan" and"designed by President Trump and for President Trump," adding they would mean"a rushed trial with little evidence in the dark of night." Schumer says the McConnell rules are"nothing like the Clinton rules," saying that includes allowing a motion to dismiss the case to be made at any time. As the senators argue, Chief Justice John Roberts, who will preside over the Senate trial, arrives on Capitol Hill. Chief Justice John Roberts arrives for the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., Jan.21, 2020. Chief Justice John Roberts arrives for the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., Jan.21, 2020. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images 12:25 p.m. Key GOP senators say they're on board with McConnell's proposed rules Heading in their weekly closed-door GOP lunch, key senators Mitt Romney of Utah and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska say they’re on board with the McConnell's rules resolution, both indicating that it looks the same to them as the Clinton trial rules resolution. Romney calls the difference between the Trump trial and Clinton resolutions “insignificant,” while Democrats have said there are major differences, accusing Republicans of using the rules to engineer a"cover-up." “You’ll get what you need in eight-hour blocks or 12-hour blocks,” Romney says, referring to the length of each of the two days Democrats would have to present their case. Murkowski echoes Romney, saying,“It’s the same 24 hours (as in Clinton), so what’s the difference if it’s eight hours or 12?” Earlier, in a statement, Romney says,"If attempts are made to vote on witnesses prior to opening arguments, I would oppose those efforts." -- ABC's Trish Turner and Devin Dwyer 11:31 a.m. Schumer says McConnell's proposed rules will force debate into the 'dead of night' Ahead of the Senate trial, Minority Leader Chuck Schumer sharply criticizes the procedural rules outlined by McConnell Monday night. Schumer takes issue with provisions he says would force debate into “the dead of night” and warns GOP moderate senators he will force an initial vote on whether to allow senators to review documents and question witnesses. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer speaks at a press conference on President Donald Trump's impeachment trial on Jan. 21, 2020, in Washington. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer speaks at a press conference on President Donald Trump's impeachment trial on Jan. 21, 2020, in Washington. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images “Right off the bat, Republican senators will face a choice about getting the facts or joining leader McConnell and President Trump in trying to cover them up,” Schumer tells reporters. “A trial with no evidence is not a trial at all. It’s a cover-up,” Schumer says. MORE: Trump impeachment trial begins as Chief Justice Roberts, senators sworn in “This is a historic moment,” Schumer adds. “The eyes of American are watching. Republican senators must rise to the occasion.” When asked if he plans to force votes to oppose McConnell’s decision to split the 24 hours designated for opening arguments over two days, Schumer says “wait and see.” Schumer says he will ask that White House documents be subpeonaed. including phone records between Trump and Ukraine's president, and other call records between administration officials about the military aid meant for Ukraine that Trump directed be withheld. -- ABC's Mariam Khan 10:15 a.m. House managers complain about proposed trial rules About three hours before they will appear on the Senate floor, House impeachment managers, led by House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff, hold a news conference to complain about McConnell's proposed rules, which would give them 24 hours over just two days or present their case, possibly meaning their arguments going past midnight. "This is a process where you do not want the American people to see the evidence," Schiff says. MORE: House impeachment managers file case brief against Trump ahead of Senate trial "We could see why this resolution was kept from us and the American people,” he says, calling it “nothing like” the Clinton resolution in terms of both witnesses and documents. House impeachment managers Rep. Adam Schiff and Rep. Jerry Nadler speak to reporters during a brief media availability before the start of the impeachment trial at the U.S. Capitol, Jan. 21, 2020, in Washington. House impeachment managers Rep. Adam Schiff and Rep. Jerry Nadler speak to reporters during a brief media availability before the start of the impeachment trial at the U.S. Capitol, Jan. 21, 2020, in Washington. Drew Angerer/Getty Images “It does not prescribe a process for a fair trial and the American trial desperately want to believe that the Senate ... will give the president a fair trial.” Without documents, Schiff said, you can’t determine which witnesses to call and what to ask them. He was joined by the full managing team. He also said McConnell is “compressing the time of the trial,” citing the extended 12-hour days for arguments. MORE: Trump impeachment: Here's how the process works Schiff says managers will appeal to the senators today to “live up to the oath that they have taken.” Rep. Jerry Nadler, the House Judiciary Committee chairman, who along with Schiff, will take the lead for the Democrats. Nadler said"there is no other conceivable reason the deny witnesses." Nadler adds that all the Senate is doing is to “debate whether there will be a cover up,” accusing Republicans of “being afraid of what the witnesses will say.” Schiff wouldn’t say if the House would use all 24 hours for their arguments and a full 12 hours each day but said that should be up to the House, and not the Senate in the trial rules. -- ABC's Benjamin Siegel Attorney General William Barr, left, and White House Counsel Pat Cipollone, meet with President Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House, Nov. 14, 2019. Attorney General William Barr, left, and White House Counsel Pat Cipollone, meet with President Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House, Nov. 14, 2019. Alex Brandon/AP, FILE 9:19 a.m. House managers claim "ethical questions" about White House counsel Cipollone House managers send a letter to a member of Trump’s legal team Tuesday morning stating that he was a “material witness” to the impeachment charges brought by the House. The managers, led by Schiff, claim there are “serious concerns and ethical questions” surrounding White House counsel Pat Cipollene’s role as Trump’s top impeachment lawyer. “You must disclose all facts and information as to which you have first-hand knowledge that will be at issue in connection with evidence you present or arguments you make in your role as the President’s legal advocate so that the Senate and Chief Justice can be apprised of any potential ethical issues, conflicts, or biases,” the House managers write in a letter to Cipollone. ABC News reported Friday that Cipollone would continue to lead the president’s defense through the impeachment trial along with the president's personal lawyer, Jay Sekulow. They’re joined on Trump's defense team by former independent counsel lawyers Ken Starr and Robert Ray who were both involved in investigating and prosecuting the impeachment case against President Bill Clinton. -- ABC's John Parkinson opening of his impeachment trial Tuesday could give him exactly that. Sources on Capitol Hill expect the first full day of the trial to be something of a political food fight. At the heart of that debate is whether or not to call witnesses who Democrats claim have first-hand knowledge of the president's alleged pressure campaign against Ukraine. Read more: ABC News

Dear ChiefJusticeJohnRoberts, This is your historical moment, your chance to do what Chief Justice John Marshall once did: Save the Republic. History will see you as a hero, or as an enabler of the worst attack on the American republic. Will you 'preside' over a fair trial? 😐 You yourself are implicated, so please be quiet.

trump and his whole team are liars. End of statement. GStephanopoulos BREAKING NEWS,.... BOLTON TELLS ALL JUST MINUTES AGO GStephanopoulos trump and his whole team are liars. End of statement. GStephanopoulos clinging to a leaking life raft here... GStephanopoulos No... there aren’t any surprises. The republicans are acting just the way we thought they would.

GStephanopoulos By Moderate Senators, he means White House and Moscow.

Proposed rules for Trump's Senate impeachment trial could set up a heated debate on TuesdayTrump's impeachment trial will likely start with a fierce debate between Democrats and Republicans over proposed rules for the first stage of the Senate trial. The House should call witnesses for testimony everyday from now until it's over. BoltonMustTestify LevParnas RudyColludy NunesConspiredWithParnas ImpeachBarr RobertHyde NunesAide ManyManyMore I’m just waiting for this to end like Lindsay graham wants only to have more articles of impeachment written. 😂😂😂 RemoveTrump MoscowMitch GOPCoverUp

McConnell Unveils Rules for Trump Impeachment TrialBreaking News: Mitch McConnell unveiled rules for the impeachment trial that would hurry the proceeding and would not admit the House evidence without a vote. But Nancy had leverage or something! Yeah, I think your readers are more interested in the news not your opinion about the news unless it is opinion. 😐 Pelosi and Schiff should schedule Lev Parness to testify publicly next week and also subpoena Bolton to testify.

McConnell plans speedy Trump impeachment trialWe know how this impeachment will end...Trump will be exonerated & his popularity will increase.

Trump impeachment trial: What to expect as the Senate trial resumesOne contentious issue will be whether to call witnesses. Democrats want to call John Bolton and others. But some GOP senators say that's unnecessary.

Trump Impeachment Trial: Live Updates as Senate Starts Rules DebateBreaking News: President Trump’s impeachment trial is about to begin in the Senate, starting with a fierce debate over how it should be run. Watch it live and get key updates. President trump's impeachment is really a absurd and foolish act..... Viva PresidentTrump

Trump Legal Team to Ask Senate for Speedy Acquittal in Impeachment TrialBreaking News: President Trump’s legal team will dismiss impeachment as a “rigged process” in its formal brief, urging the Senate to quickly acquit him at trial Trump believes that he is perfect and never wrong, so anyone who disagrees with him must either be stupid or have an evil agenda. He literally cannot believe that an honest, intelligent person could question his actions. Megalomania. 'A King cannot be tried by any superior jurisdiction on Earth...' ~ King Charles I 늙다리 미치광이



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