Prettylittlething Advertisement Banned in the UK for Being 'Overly Sexualized'

2/6/2020 1:09:00 AM

A @officialPLT ad just got banned from the UK for being 'overly sexualized':

Advertising, Prettylittlething

A officialPLT ad just got banned from the UK for being 'overly sexualized':

The ad was 'likely to cause serious offense and was irresponsible,' according to the Advertising Standards Authority.

The independent advertising regulator ruled on Wednesday that an ad created by Prettylittlething was"offensive and irresponsible" and therefore should be banned. The ad, which was created as a pre-roll ad on YouTube that might show up before one of your searched-for videos, features models in bikini tops, assless chaps and vinyl looking at the camera in a manner the ASA deemed"seductive" and posing with neon bar lights.

"We considered that the cumulative effect of the scenes meant that overall, the products had been presented in an overly-sexualized way that invited viewers to view the women as sexual objects," wrote the ASA in an official release."We therefore concluded that the ad was likely to cause serious offense and was irresponsible."

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The ad was "likely to cause serious offense and was irresponsible," according to the Advertising Standards Authority.A Pretty Little Thing advert has been banned by the UK’s advertising watchdog over concerns it objectified women.A Pretty Little Thing advert has been banned by the UK’s advertising watchdog over concerns it objectified women.At the start of January, the Irish government announced plans to ban the sale of "fossil fuel cars" by the year 2030, while Denmark has also proposed a phaseout of new diesel and petrol car sales in 2030.

Author:Whitney BauckUpdated:Feb 5, 2020Original:Feb 5, 2020Fashion may be known for creating provocative imagery that pushes boundaries, but it's still not a total free-for-all — at least as long as the UK-based Advertising Standards Authority has any say. The independent advertising regulator ruled on Wednesday that an ad created by Prettylittlething was"offensive and irresponsible" and therefore should be banned. A later scene depicted a model wearing a transparent mesh bodysuit while lying on her side with her knee bent up and a neon bar in between her legs. The ad, which was created as a pre-roll ad on YouTube that might show up before one of your searched-for videos, features models in bikini tops, assless chaps and vinyl looking at the camera in a manner the ASA deemed"seductive" and posing with neon bar lights. The Advertising Standards Agency (ASA) looked into the ad, which aired back in October, after someone complained it was overly sexualised and objectified women – and challenged whether the ad was offensive and irresponsible. "We considered that the cumulative effect of the scenes meant that overall, the products had been presented in an overly-sexualized way that invited viewers to view the women as sexual objects," wrote the ASA in an official release. Related Video: Pretty Little Thing Launches 'Butt-Baring' JeansAnother scene from the ad featured a woman in a bikini top, holding a neon bar behind her shoulders in a “highly sexualised pose which accentuated her breasts”, the ASA said."We therefore concluded that the ad was likely to cause serious offense and was irresponsible. Related Tags.

" The ad was first flagged by a complainant in October of last year, and since then, Prettylittlething has presented moodboards to"demonstrate the creative theory behind the ad" and claimed that it was inspired by rave-going customers. In defence of the ad, PLT said it highlighted how it “supported and promoted diversity through bold and distinctive fashion of all shapes and sizes which focused on different trends”. In defence of the ad, PLT said it highlighted how it “supported and promoted diversity through bold and distinctive fashion of all shapes and sizes which focused on different trends”. The ASA complainant won this round, as the ad is not allowed to appear again in its current form, and Prettylittlething was urged"not to use advertising that was likely to cause serious offense by objectifying women." But considering that the ad is still viewable in its entirety on sites like the Independent — not to mention being written up by news sources — one has to wonder if this ruling might actually contribute to more people seeing the ad, rather than fewer.  “We don’t just anticipate trends; we create them,” the brand’s website boasts, “as we deliver our girl product inspired from the catwalk, celebs, and coolest influencers of the moment. Stay current on the latest trends, news and people shaping the fashion industry.” It has close connections to TV culture, especially ITV2′s Love Island, whose islanders often go on to sign sponsored contracts to promote Pretty Little Thing lines – or design their own. Sign up for our daily newsletter. Responding to the ASA complaint, the brand said that it had not intended to create an ad that was seen to be offensive and irresponsible, and that it worked hard to promote a positive and healthy body image that was inclusive and empowered women.

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