Next fall’s new COVID vaccine will be different

6/29/2022 3:16:00 AM

Next fall’s new COVID vaccine will be different

Next fall’s new COVID vaccine will be different

A two-strain vaccine will better protect against fast-moving virus, says an FDA panel.

June 28, 2022 at 5:14 p.Expand Virus Outbreak Updating Vaccines FILE - A health worker administers a dose of a COVID-19 vaccine during a vaccination clinic at the Keystone First Wellness Center in Chester, Pa.Email Behavioral expert discusses how COVID-19 pandemic impacted society Dr.Email At least some U.

m.| UPDATED: June 28, 2022 at 5:36 p.15, 2021.m.S.Troubled by waning immune protection against the COVID virus, this fall’s vaccine booster should be a redesigned two-strain version, according to a recommendation by the FDA’s panel of experts on Tuesday.(AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File) (Matt Rourke) LAURAN NEERGAARD and MATTHEW PERRONE June 28, 2022 at 5:02 pm EDT Some U.The new recipe – which would contain the genetic code for both the original strain and an omicron strain – would be a better match against the evolving pathogen, they said."We are going to be behind the eight-ball if we wait longer," said one adviser, Dr.

“We’re trying to get ahead of a virus that has been very crafty,” said Dr.adults are a step closer to getting updated COVID-19 boosters this fall, as government advisers voted Tuesday that it’s time to tweak shots to better match the most recent virus variants.Advisers to the FDA voted 19-2 that some version of omicron should be part a fall booster campaign, an effort to blunt an expected COVID-19 surge.Peter Marks, who oversees vaccine regulation at the FDA.“The benefits outweigh the risks of making this change.Advisers to the FDA voted 19-2 that some version of omicron should be part a fall booster campaign, an effort to blunt an expected COVID-19 surge.” The vote comes as California’s COVID-19 positivity rate continues to climb, surpassing anything the state has seen this year.But panelists cautioned that the recommendation doesn't necessarily mean everyone would get a tweaked booster — they might be urged only for older adults or those at high risk from the virus.The California Department of Public Health on Tuesday reported the statewide positivity rate at 13.Mark Sawyer of the University of California, San Diego.But"we may at least bring the immune system closer to being able to respond to what's circulating" now rather than far older virus strains.

2%, up from 11.4% the previous week, as new, more transmissible variants grow throughout the state.Current COVID-19 vaccines have saved millions of lives globally and those used in the U.still offer strong protection against hospitalization and death -- especially after a booster dose.Public health experts are braced for a larger surge in cases this fall and winter, as people head indoors.Existing vaccines, based on the original one-strain version of the virus, still prevent death.still offer strong protection against hospitalization and death -- especially after a booster dose.But there are a growing number of so-called “breakthrough” cases – and, more worrisome, some older people are getting seriously ill, despite vaccination.The two newest omicron cousins, called BA.S.

Public health experts blame the fast-spreading omicron subvariants BA.Pfizer and Moderna tested shots updated to better match the omicron that surged over the winter, but that first mutant has disappeared -- replaced by its genetically distinct relatives.4 and BA.5, which now dominate the U.4 and BA.S.S., representing 52% of all new infections, according to CDC data.S.5, together now make up half of U.

Because they can partially evade immunity, they are 10% more transmissible than the earlier BA.And while a second booster that’s recommended for people 50 and older again restores protection, only a quarter of those eligible have gotten one.2 subtype.Only about half of vaccinated Americans have gotten a single booster.If these trends continue, more hospitalizations are expected, according to statistical models presented by Justin Lessler, a professor of epidemiology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.“And particularly with a variant,” he said, “we do see a substantial probability of resurgences in the fall.Authorities hope an updated booster for fall might entice more interest., on Tuesday, Apr.” Between 95,000 and 211,000 people could die of COVID between March 2022 and March 2023, Lessler said.Both companies found the tweaked shots also offered some cross-protection against those worrisome BA.

The advisory panel did not address who would be first in line for the new vaccine, but it is likely that people over age 50 who have already received two doses would be offered the initial doses, said Marks.The FDA has the final word on vaccine strategy, but it typically follows the panel’s recommendations.The decision creates a logistical challenge: Manufacturers must quickly produce enough of the new vaccine to help fend off next winter’s anticipated surge.If the panel had stuck with existing vaccines, there are abundant supplies.A delayed rollout means lost lives.Both companies said they'd have plenty of omicron-targeted combo shots by October but Moderna said switching to target omicron's newest relatives might delay its version another month.

Doses of modified vaccine could cost the federal government about $5 billion to $12 billion, one senior federal official told The New York Times.At the meeting, Pfizer said it could have the new product available in the first week of October.Moderna said its vaccine would be ready in late October or early November.Novavax, which hasn’t yet received an emergency use authorization for its vaccine, said its existing product is able to protect against new variants but that an updated vaccine would be available “in the fourth quarter of the year.” The committee of largely outside experts voted 16 to 2 for the booster after daylong public debate about complex data that compared the effectiveness of different vaccine formulations against different variants." The logistics will be challenging.

The two “no” votes were cast by Dr.Paul Offit of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and Dr.Hank Bernstein of the Zucker School of Medicine.Offit expressed concern about the speed of the shift, based on relatively small clinical studies.“I think as a new product it should be handled as a new product,” he said.Advisers to the World Health Organization recently said omicron-tweaked shots would be most beneficial as a booster only, because they should increase the breadth of people's cross-protection against multiple variants.

“I think we need a higher standard than what we’ve been given.I think it’s uncomfortably scant.” Data from both Pfizer and Moderna shows that the so-called “bivalent” vaccine produces a higher level of protection – as measured by neutralizing antibodies – compared with the existing vaccine.While the panel didn’t vote on which omicron sub-type should be used in the vaccine, they leaned toward today’s fast-sweeping BA.4 and BA..

5, rather than the original omicron BA.1.That’s a different strategy than the one taken by the World Health Organization.Because there is so much uncertainty about the future trajectory of viral evolution, WHO is opting for a BA.1-based version, according to WHO’s Kanta Subbarao.

It appears to offer a broader, rather than targeted, immune response, she said.But the FDA panel noted that a vaccine based on the BA.4 and BA.5 subtypes seems to elicit more antibodies to those dangerous new viruses than a vaccine based on the only BA.1 version.

They also protect against BA.1.With the ancestral strain long gone, why bother including it in a new vaccine? Moderna president Stephen Hoge presented intriguing data showing that the antibody levels triggered by a bivalent vaccine stayed higher longer.With the ancestral strain long gone, why bother including it in a new vaccine? Moderna president Stephen Hoge presented intriguing data showing that the antibody levels triggered by a bivalent vaccine stayed higher longer.The panel also didn’t discuss whether the design of the two-dose “primary series” also should be changed.

Many Americans still have not gotten these shots.According to the CDC, about 22% of eligible Americans have not received their first dose and 33% had not gotten both doses.Related Articles.

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FDA advisers recommend updating COVID booster shots for fallGovernment advisers are recommending that some U.S. adults get a modified COVID-19 booster shot this fall — one that better matches more recent virus variants

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