Franklin County judge restores historic barber chair as symbol of civil rights

Franklin County judge restores historic barber chair as symbol of civil rights

1/24/2022 2:02:00 PM

Franklin County judge restores historic barber chair as symbol of civil rights

A barber chair used for more than 64 years in shops owned by Dave and Nelson Lynch has special meaning for the Franklin County judge who restored it

The judge purchased the chair on a lark after seeing if advertised on Facebook Marketplace in July.Lynch family: Pillars of Columbus' Black communitythe late Amos Lynch Sr."In the Black community, there's a lot of significance to the barber shop or the beauty shop," Orville Jr. said."That was our networking location, and still is... A lot of the big decisions and discussions and political deals — and endorsements that The Call and Post did — happened at Uncle Dave's barbershop."

Read more: Columbus Dispatch »

‘We Have to Act': Biden Calls for Tougher Gun Laws After Texas School Shooting

An anguished and angry President Joe Biden called for new restrictions on firearms Tuesday night after a gunman massacred 18 children at a Texas elementary school. “We have to act,” Biden told the nation, after years of failure to pass new laws. “When in God’s name are we going to stand up to the gun lobby?” Biden said at the White House… Read more >>

What a beautiful and historic gesture by Judge Aveni. I can't imagine some of the conversations that took place between customers and members of the Lynch family. A significant part of Columbus Black history.

Crash shuts down Route 30 in Lancaster CountyThe crash was reported Saturday morning between Hensel Road, Hoover Road and the Newport Pike.

Winter weather conditions trigger speed limit reduction on I-90 in Lake CountyThe speed limit was dropped to 50 MPH around 8:30 a.m. Sunday.

Pedestrian dies after being struck by semitruck in Tooele CountyA pedestrian with a skateboard was killed on I-80 east of Wendover on Friday. Idiot

Amid housing crunch, officials want Orange County to stay the way it is'Who wants to live in a congested urban environment?' said Newport Beach Councilwoman Diane Dixon. I never thought of meeting a legit bitcoin trader after been scammed many times at my age but the heavens sent SamAndCoTradin guided me and help me make a living through bitcoin with my coinbase app, I recommend you to meet him now and also be a beneficiary of good work I understand people want their property values to go up and stay up, but we've got to get more housing around here. The objection to new construction is really short sighted. For all those who are new to this working from home Bitcoin trading options Here's a little tip: Get a trusted Bitcoin expert and stick to her Alexander__Jeni Invest and play at similar times each day. Because : In times of chaos, your investment is your anchor to success

LA County Sees Another 72 Deaths Related to COVID-19Los Angeles County reported another 72 deaths associated with the coronavirus, along with 39,117 new positive COVID tests. Saturday’s test positivity rate was 16.1%. See the language has changed to related. 🦠💀

LA County Sees Another 72 Deaths Related To COVID-19Los Angeles County reported another 72 deaths associated with the coronavirus Saturday, along with 39,117 new positive COVID tests. When are they going to start doing early treatments? DO YOU HAVE THE RECORD OF OTHER CAUSES OF DEATH IN THE SAME TIME PERIOD?I WANT TO COMPARE THEM,OK People research Covaxin why is this not being the topic on ever news station we the ppl have the power to spread the news about Covaxin across the US the rest of the world is on board and are going to start receiving dosage of vaccine we have a supply waiting to rush once approve

| The Columbus Dispatch The 65-year-old barber chair that Franklin County Common Pleas Judge Carl Aveni recently placed in his courthouse chambers is more than a mid-20th century curiosity to the judge. It's a piece of Columbus history that speaks to a centuries-long struggle. The judge purchased the chair on a lark after seeing if advertised on Facebook Marketplace in July. "I'm a fan of things with history, of things that tell a story," he said."I've long thought of getting an old barber chair and cleaning it up and having it in my basement." But he realized that this particular barber chair was special when he picked it up from Nelson Lynch, who was selling it while upgrading his barber shop on the East Side. Lynch family: Pillars of Columbus' Black community The chair's original owner was Nelson's father, Dave Lynch, and both are members of a family that was instrumental in the civil rights movement in Columbus. The chair had been a part of the Lynch barber business since 1957, when the shop was on Mount Vernon Avenue on the Near East Side, and as the shop moved over the years to each of three different locations on East Fifth Avenue. Dave Lynch, who died in 2019, and his five siblings were pillars of Columbus' African American community. They included the late Dr. Orville Lynch Sr., an oral surgeon, and the late Amos Lynch Sr. , who earned the nickname"Godfather of the Black Press" through his decades as editor of The Call and Post, and founder and publisher of The Columbus Post. Amos, who served as a mentor to countless Black business leaders and political figures and was inducted into the Ohio Civil Rights Hall of Fame in 2011, could be found every week at his brother's barbershop, said Orville Lynch Jr., one of their nephews. "In the Black community, there's a lot of significance to the barber shop or the beauty shop," Orville Jr. said."That was our networking location, and still is... A lot of the big decisions and discussions and political deals — and endorsements that The Call and Post did — happened at Uncle Dave's barbershop." Aveni, who was elected to the Common Pleas bench in November 2020 , knew enough about the family to decide that his basement was no place for the Lynch barber chair. "It clicked in my head that, in my basement, it was just going to be an object," Aveni said."But this is an object that has meaning and history." Aveni decided to place the restored chair in his chambers at the Franklin County Courthouse earlier this month. There, he said, it is"more than just a barber chair. It's a reminder of some important things about Columbus' history and about societal progression toward justice." He spent the past six months restoring the chair where he could find the room he needed (the garage of his parents' Columbus home), stripping it down to the frame, cleaning the metal and re-upholstering the seat with new leather. "I didn't know what I was getting into," Aveni said."I watched a lot of YouTube videos." 'The symbolism is so powerful' Nelson Lynch and Orville Lynch Jr. were impressed with the results when they visited Aveni's chambers recently after the judge — with some help — hauled the 350-pound chair to the courthouse. "It's beautiful," said Nelson Lynch, who started cutting hair alongside his father in 1991 and has operated the shop on his own since 2012. "For me, the symbolism is so powerful," he said."So many people have been in this chair, so many walks of life, so many dreams. All the energy of all those people who walked through those doors are in this. The dreams, the sad things that happened, the hopes, all of that is here. Anyone sitting here is going to feel it." That's Aveni's hope. Rather than display it like a museum piece, he wants lawyers and others who visit his chambers"to literally put yourself in the place of the people who sat in this chair over the last half-century," he said. "Sit where they sat and imagine the lives they lived." Aveni's ultimate plan is to donate the chair to the courthouse so it is there long after his career as a judge is over. To that end, he attached a plaque on one arm of the chair, outlining the history of the chair and the significance of the family who owned it, concluding with the following words: "As you sit here, please reflect on the themes of Equity and Justice it represents."