Facebook reverses its policy on paid influencers after Bloomberg memes

Facebook reverses its policy on paid influencers after Bloomberg memes

15.2.2020

Facebook reverses its policy on paid influencers after Bloomberg memes

Facebook has decided to let political campaigns pay online influencers to spread their messages, a practice that had sidestepped many of the social network’s rules governing political ads.

it has declined to fact-check political ads and refuses to ban even blatantly false messages from politicians. Before the explosion of social media, it was clearer what constituted an ad and what didn’t — and thus what’s subject to disclosures and other rules. With social media, a campaign can pay celebrities and other influential users to spread a message on their behalf, without ever buying an ad and being subject to its rules. “This is a new kind of activity that simply didn’t exist when the rules for internet political communications were last updated,” said Commissioner Ellen L. Weintraub of the Federal Election Commission. Friday’s policy change involves what Facebook calls “branded content” — sponsored items posted by ordinary users who are typically paid by companies or organizations. Advertisers pay the influential users directly to post about their brand. Advertisement Facebook doesn’t make money directly from such posts and doesn’t consider them advertising. As a result, branded content wasn’t governed by Facebook’s advertising policies, which require candidates and campaigns to verify their identity with a U.S. ID or mailing address and disclose how much they spent running each ad. Until Friday, Facebook tried to deter campaigns from using such branded content by barring them from using a tool designed to help advertisers run such posts on Facebook and Instagram, which is owned by Facebook. The rule change now allows campaigns in the U.S. to use this tool, provided they’ve been authorized by Facebook to run political ads and disclose who paid for the sponsored posts. Campaigns that avoid using the tool, as Bloomberg had, risk having their accounts suspended. “After hearing from multiple campaigns, we agree that there’s a place for branded content in political discussion on our platforms,” Facebook said in an exclusive statement to the Associated Press. “We’re allowing U.S.-based political candidates to work with creators to run this content.” Politicians still won’t be required to disclose how much they paid the influencers to run the posts. And the posts won’t appear in Facebook’s ad library, which publicly catalogs political ads and allows other campaigns, journalists and watchdog groups to view the type of messages politicians are pushing in the election. Facebook’s new rules won’t apply to someone merely creating or sharing a post about a politician without getting paid. Facebook said it is asking the influencer accounts that posted the Bloomberg memes to retroactively use the tool meant for such posts. After this happens, the posts will be labeled as a “paid partnership” with Bloomberg. Google says it doesn’t allow political messages using its main tools for connecting with influencers, but campaigns can make individual arrangements with YouTube influencers. These videos would be covered under general disclosure rules, but would not be added to Google’s political advertising database. The Bloomberg campaign had taken the unconventional step of paying social media influencers — individuals with huge followings — to post Bloomberg memes using their Instagram accounts. Different versions of the sponsored posts from the Bloomberg campaign ran on more than a dozen influential Instagram accounts, each of which have millions of followers. Advertisement The Bloomberg campaign’s memes showed the 78-year-old candidate, in a tongue-in-cheek awkward fashion, chatting with popular social media influencers with names like “Tank Sinatra,” asking them to help him raise his profile among younger folk. “Can you post a meme that lets everyone know I’m the cool candidate?” Bloomberg wrote in one of the exchanges posted by an Instagram account with nearly 15 million followers. The candidate then sent a photo of him wearing baggy chino shorts, an orange polo and a zip-up vest. The reply: “Ooof that will cost like a billion dollars.” The billionaire candidate responded by asking where to send the money. With the sponsored posts, Bloomberg’s campaign said it was reaching those who might not be normally interested in the day-to-day of politics. “You want to engage people at every platform and you want them to feel like they’re not just getting a canned generic statement,” campaign spokeswoman Sabrina Singh said of the campaign’s strategy. The Bloomberg campaign declined to say how much it paid for the sponsored posts, or if it had more in the works. Read more: Los Angeles Times

Hmmmmm Money and its power can buy any thing it desires from humans. It buys men, women, lands, luxury, physical pleasure and all there is. Every thing is on sale except peace of mind or contentment. Good luck Mr. Bloomberg. NeverBloomberg They should have to disclose that they are paid advertisers though.

What’s the difference between this and Trump being able to pay to lie in ads on Facebook? Zuckerberg sucks!!! Plain & simple! Technically it would have been reversing policy not to allow paid influencers. We’ve been watching the deplorables pollute the internet for the past decade with their communist propaganda 🙄💸

He buying up this election Almost makes you wonder if Facebook is trying to pick a winner Unless Trump does it and then it’s ok. Corruption, pure and simple.

Facebook reverses on paid influencers after Bloomberg memesFacebook has decided to let political campaigns pay online influencers to spread their messages, a practice that had sidestepped many of the social network&39;s rules governing political ads. Friday&39;s policy reversal highlights difficulties tech companies and regulators have in keeping up with

Mike Bloomberg Campaign is Paying Social Media Influencers to Post Political Memes OnlineThe Bloomberg campaign is using the Tribe app to hire social media influencers to post political memes, PEOPLE confirms So what?

See the memes Mike Bloomberg's campaign paid Instagram influencers for - Business InsiderMike Bloomberg's presidential campaign has hired a meme collective to deploy meme-ads all over Instagram — see them here.

Mike Bloomberg is paying online influencers to post memes for his 2020 campaignDemocratic presidential candidate Mike Bloomberg was recently the subject of several satirical memes uploaded to Instagram. I dont want another Billionaire in The White House. Especially dont want a President that buys his votes! Have had enough of this bs! that's a bit too much in my view. They must not be that good... haven’t seen a single Meme...

Memes parodying Mike Bloomberg's paid Instagram meme campaign are flooding the internet - InsiderIt can be difficult to distinguish between the real sponsored Bloomberg posts and the fakers – but that may have been the campaign's intention.

Bloomberg campaign pays social media accounts for memesU.S. Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg's campaign is payi... American oligarch lol That's a disgusting form of corporate propaganda.



Celebrities rally to send bullied boy to Disneyland

BTS Find Acceptance With Explosive, Empowering New Single 'ON'

BTS Unveil Fierce Manifesto Music Video for 'Map of the Soul: 7' Single 'ON': Watch

BTS' 'Map of the Soul: 7' Is Here: Stream It Now

11 Americans at Omaha facility tested positive for coronavirus, hospital says

Trump isn't pleased a South Korean film won best-picture Oscar

Trump complains about 'Parasite' winning best picture

Write Comment

Thank you for your comment.
Please try again later.

Latest News

News

15 February 2020, Saturday News

Previous news

Amid coronavirus fears, a second wave of flu hits U.S. kids

Next news

These Photos of Brad Pitt and Regina King Having a Moment After His Oscar Win Are So Pure
Iran says coronavirus has spread to several cities, reports two new deaths Mother Charged in Missing Idaho Children Case Complicated by Multiple Deaths Wrestler adds to abuse allegations against university doctor Little League teams in several states are dropping the Houston Astros name in the wake of its cheating scandal Terminally ill 20-year-old gifts Dallas school with new fitness center Joaquin Phoenix rescues mother cow and calf from slaughterhouse Trump tries new approach for $1 trillion infrastructure plan Meet America's only all-female firefighter leadership team (Part 2) Dana White Backs Donald Trump At Campaign Rally, Let's Win Again! 'Once Were Brothers' Review: Robbie Robertson Looks Back in Anger, Joy, Sentimentality Presidential Pardons Through History: Who’s Received Them? Larry Kudlow says falling bond yields don't reflect the US economy's 'fundamentals'
Celebrities rally to send bullied boy to Disneyland BTS Find Acceptance With Explosive, Empowering New Single 'ON' BTS Unveil Fierce Manifesto Music Video for 'Map of the Soul: 7' Single 'ON': Watch BTS' 'Map of the Soul: 7' Is Here: Stream It Now 11 Americans at Omaha facility tested positive for coronavirus, hospital says Trump isn't pleased a South Korean film won best-picture Oscar Trump complains about 'Parasite' winning best picture This highway was once a tribute to the Confederacy. Soon, it will honor Harriet Tubman McDonald's is making scented candles that smell like your favorite Quarter Pounder ingredients Joe Jonas' Birthday Tribute to Pregnant Sophie Turner Is the Sweetest Trump blasts best-picture Oscar for South Korean film 'Parasite' U.S. women's soccer players seek more than $66 million in damages