Mental Health, Suicide Rates, Suicide Prevention, Depression, Anxiety, Pandemic

Mental Health, Suicide Rates

A New Study Shows Suicide Attempts Among Young Girls Have Risen 50% During the Pandemic—Here's How To Help

New alarming statistic from the CDC shows that suicide rates among teen girls have dramatically increased during the pandemic. Here's how you can help.

6/16/2021 11:00:00 PM

According to a new study by the CDC, visits to the ER as a result of suicide attempts have risen 50.6% among girls ages 12-17. Here's what to know and how you can help:

New alarming statistic from the CDC shows that suicide rates among teen girls have dramatically increased during the pandemic. Here's how you can help.

According to a new study by the Center for Disease Control, visits to the ER as a result of suicide attempts have risen 50.6% among girls ages 12-17. In males, the number, while still serious, increased by 3.7%. ADVERTISEMENT "The mean weekly number of these visits was 26.2% higher during summer 2020 and 50.6% higher during winter 2021, compared with the corresponding periods in 2019," researchers wrote in their study.

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The suspected reason for this rise is the effects of isolation as a result of the pandemic during a very important developmental period for young girls.  The study showed an overall increase in the need for mental health services, but the statistics regarding young girls specifically require more attention. It is essential that we focus on the young girls who desperately need help. 

What to Do With This StatisticNow more than ever, it is crucial to help those young girls who are suffering. Here is a list of a few things you can do to help:1. Keep an eye out for any signs that may signal suicidal thoughts.According to save.org, signs that one is considering suicide include mood swings, isolation, increased substance use, and an overall increase in anger or rage.  headtopics.com

2. Keep a list of resources on hand to be able to offer someone the help that you cannot give.ADVERTISEMENT It is very important to realize that while we may be of assistance in this time of need, it is always best to find professional help. Hotlines and medical professionals can offer help in areas where one may not be qualified to. Here is a list of suicide prevention resources geared specifically to youth. 

3. Check in on your friends and family. This may be one of the most important things one can do to help those in need. If you see a friend isolating themselves or acting differently, your text or call can immensely help them. It never hurts to reach out.

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