2021 Was Among The Hottest On Record, A Reminder Global Warming Isn't Going Anywhere

1/13/2022 11:10:00 PM

“Temperatures will keep rising as long as we keep increasing greenhouse gases,” one climate scientist said.

“Temperatures will keep rising as long as we keep increasing greenhouse gases,” one climate scientist said.

“Temperatures will keep rising as long as we keep increasing greenhouse gases,” one climate scientist said.

, among many other extreme weather events in 2021.The researchers noted that a climate pattern known as La Niña helped to slightly cool parts of the Pacific Ocean in 2021, which may continue into this year. However, the average temperatures in the last seven years have all leaped over previous decades’ records.

“It’s clear that each of the past four decades have been warmer than the one that preceded it,” Russell Vose, chief of the analysis and synthesis branch of NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information, told reporters. “And it’s been a steady increase in temperature since at least the 1960s.”

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World ocean temperatures in 2021 were the hottest ever recordedA study ties the warming trend to human emissions of greenhouse gases from the burning of fossil fuels. Excellent! I hate wading in and freezing my ass off! Most of the warming has been absorbed by the oceans and the effects are clear to see. If we lose the oceans we lose everything.

COVID was again the leading cause of death among U.S. law enforcement in 2021Some 458 officers died in the line of duty, making 2021 the deadliest year since 1930. The vast majority of deaths — 301 — are attributed to COVID-19, followed by firearm and traffic incidents.

COVID-19 was the leading cause of death among police officers in 2021, report saysA new report found 301 officers died from COVID in 2021, and that number is expected to increase. I heard it was the leading cause of death in 2019 also I feel owned. Then get vaccinated.

2021 Is Expected to Rank as Biggest Year for Inflation in Four DecadesInflation is on track to have closed out 2021 near its highest level since 1982 as robust consumer demand exacerbated pandemic-related supply shortages. Where's this story, Best Economy since the 1960s? Thank You Mr. President Biden Thanks Joe , potus keep up the good work wrecking the poor and middle class in America, guess that’s what you were elected to do….. Wait a minute. Bare shelves is a myth. That is what AOC and other politicians are telling me. Where did you find this picture?

Enemy Reaction 2021: Arizona Cardinals“Lockett eats our lunch all the time” “Refs holding their flags to keep Russ in Seattle” “This team is f—king garbage” Enemy Reaction 2021: Arizona Cardinals (plus bonus reactions from the Chargers-Raiders game!) I still have no idea why they were kicking field goals at the end of the game. You either go for the TD or worse case you have Seattle pinned way back in their end. But a FG means you still need to another TD.

Porsche's electric Taycan outsells 911 in record 2021The Macan was the best-seller, but the pure electric Taycan outsold the 911, in global figures revealed today

faced massive tornadoes , among many other extreme weather events in 2021..Email A preliminary report says 458 U.Law Enforcement Officers Fatalities Report said.

The researchers noted that a climate pattern known as La Niña helped to slightly cool parts of the Pacific Ocean in 2021, which may continue into this year. However, the average temperatures in the last seven years have all leaped over previous decades’ records. Why it matters: The oceans store at least 90% of the extra heat retained in the atmosphere from human-induced greenhouse gas emissions, and ocean warming is increasingly tied to extreme weather and climate events. “It’s clear that each of the past four decades have been warmer than the one that preceded it,” Russell Vose, chief of the analysis and synthesis branch of NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information, told reporters. (Scott Olson/Getty Images) Last year was the deadliest for active-duty law enforcement in nearly a century, with COVID-19 identified as the leading cause of death for the second year in a row. “And it’s been a steady increase in temperature since at least the 1960s. Each clearly shows ocean temperatures reached new heights in 2021, continuing their sharp increase during the past several decades.” Climate researchers expect the years ahead to follow this pattern and predict we will reach an increase of 1.  "Not only are we fighting with the criminals, we're also fighting with this virus that's out there," he said.

5 degrees Celsius in the 2030s or early 2040s. Seawater expands as it warms, yielding higher sea levels, more marine heat waves that can kill sensitive coral reefs, and other ecosystem changes. "This year's statistics demonstrate that America's front-line law enforcement officers continue to battle the deadly effects of the Covid-19 pandemic nationwide," the report reads. However, regardless of when the globe reaches that temperature, scientists point out that global warming data is no longer just data but is playing out in real life. The planet has already warmed more than 1 degree Celsius compared to 1880s levels. What they're saying: "The oceans will continue to warm until net carbon emissions go to zero. Time is quickly running out to limit warming another half degree, which is the goal of the Paris climate agreement. That's an increase of 65% in one year. Frustration about the lack of action on cutting greenhouse gas emissions came to a head at November’s 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference, which left many climate activists and developing countries with minimal progress from larger countries. Go deeper.  Former Connecticut state trooper Troy Anderson told CBS News that the number of officer deaths in the line of duty deserves more attention.

“Temperatures will keep rising as long as we keep increasing greenhouse gases,” Schmidt said. That means 2022 will probably be another hot one, filled with more dangerous disasters. The NLEOMF emphasizes that this number is preliminary and expects it to keep growing. “We can predict with some confidence that we will see more and more extreme heat waves, more intense rainfall, and more coastal flooding,” Schmidt said. “It may not be the Pacific Northwest next year, but it will be somewhere and we will obviously have to be prepared.” Just this week, South America and Australia are facing blistering heat waves. And it says that's clearly still happening.

Western Australia’s Onslow today hit 123.2 degrees Fahrenheit, or 50.7 degrees Celsius, matching a record-high temperature for the region set back in 1962, . Yet police departments and unions in cities — including New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles, Seattle and Phoenix — have pushed back against mandates requiring vaccines for public employees, filing lawsuits and threatening resignation.