Ukraine war: What are the risks of a nuclear accident at the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant amid the war with Russia?

8/8/2022 11:51:00 PM

Former Ukrainian president Petro Poroshenko has warned of a potential 'catastrophe' at the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant. Read the full story:

Former Ukrainian president Petro Poroshenko has warned of a potential 'catastrophe' at the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant. Read the full story:

The Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant in southwestern Ukraine has been hit by shelling for a second time, triggering warnings of a major nuclear incident.

AdvertisementAlthough officials confirmed there were no radioactive leaks as a result, it saw operators disconnect one of the site's reactors as a safety measure.Russia's Interfax news agency said that Ukrainian forces fired the shells and that they only hit one of the site's administration buildings.

In the early hours of 4 March, soon after the Russians invaded, a missile hit a training building and set it on fire.It has a capacity of six gigawatts, which is enough energy to power four million homes and sits near the Dnipro River in southwest Ukraine.

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russians will probably not give up the nuclear power plant..sent some NATO special forces to overtake it, stop talking only, russians don't understand it only force poroshenko Doesn't matter if Ukraine is the cause of this, or Russia, if Russia didn't invade Ukraine, this didn't happen, do if it exploded I hope all radiation goes into Russia.

What about the water started sinking into the Sea. So tell the Ukrainians to stop shelling it lmao Ukrainians are becoming masters in Propaganda Warfare. Well Done! Ukraine government is the corrupt one's...wake up folks

Attacks on Ukraine power plant stir concern over nuclear accident\n\t\t\tJournalists in 50+ countries follow the constant flow of money made and lost in oil & gas while\n\t\t\ttracking emerging trends and opportunities in the future of energy. Don’t miss our exclusive\n\t\t\tnewsletter, Energy Source.\n\t\t This affects Russia as much as the West. UkraineRussiaWar 🤡 lexhoogduin Has the IAEA taken any steps (towards the Ukr. government) to prevent further shelling?

Attacks on Ukraine power plant stir concern over nuclear accident\n\t\t\tJournalists in 50+ countries follow the constant flow of money made and lost in oil & gas while\n\t\t\ttracking emerging trends and opportunities in the future of energy. Don’t miss our exclusive\n\t\t\tnewsletter, Energy Source.\n\t\t

'Very real risk of nuclear disaster' as shelling continues at huge Ukraine plantThe massive Zaporizhzhia nuclear plant, which has been used as a base by Russian troops since March, has been shelled by Ukrainian forces – risking a Chernobyl-style disaster

UN Calls For Inspection Of Shelled Ukrainian Nuclear Plant | OilPrice.comThe UN’s Secretary General is calling for international access to Europe’s largest nuclear plant after Ukraine and Russia traded accusations over the recent shelling of the facility

Ukraine news live: Russian troops have 'wired nuclear power plant with explosives'; 'no basis' for Zelenskyy-Putin peace talks; two key bridges hitUkraine latest as grain ships continue to leave Black Sea ports; the Ministry of Defence warns Russia is 'highly likely' deploying mines in the Donbas; the UN calls for international access to Europe's largest nuclear power plant after shelling. Russia planted explosives there as a form of nuclear blackmail. It is a sign of Russian desperation, not strength! It is Putin's maniacal bargaining chip. There will be no Chernobyl-like event as Putin cannot afford contaminating NATO countries with radiation. Sleep easy. ☢️👍

Ukraine war: Wembley exhibition shows 'beauty' of countryUkrainian art is put on show at Wembley Stadium with the aim to keep the war in the public eye. When are they exhibiting beauty of Palestinians? Why won’t they put up artwork to remember the 2million Palestinians in the Gaza Ghetto who are attacked for dreaming of freedom and resisting occupation? How bout one on ApartheidIsrael

Russia and Ukraine blamed each other - accusing the other side of"nuclear terrorism" - Mr Grossi urged for the"utmost restraint" around the site.Energy coverage from Saudi Arabia to Texas Journalists in 50+ countries follow the constant flow of money made and lost in oil & gas while tracking emerging trends and opportunities in the future of energy.Energy coverage from Saudi Arabia to Texas Journalists in 50+ countries follow the constant flow of money made and lost in oil & gas while tracking emerging trends and opportunities in the future of energy.As Russian and Ukrainian forces continue to fight for possession of Europe’s biggest nuclear power station there’s a “very real risk of nuclear disaster,” says the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Experts, meanwhile, warn that the plant getting caught up in the conflict could result in a nuclear accident similar to the one in Fukushima, Japan in 2011. Advertisement What happened over the weekend? On Friday, shelling near the city of Enerhodar in southwest Ukraine hit a high-voltage power line that feeds into the nearby nuclear power plant, Reuters reported. Choose your subscription Try full digital access and see why over 1 million readers subscribe to the FT 1 € for 4 weeks. Although officials confirmed there were no radioactive leaks as a result, it saw operators disconnect one of the site's reactors as a safety measure. The following day, Ukraine's nuclear operator Energoatom said Russian missiles damaged three radiation monitors at the plant's storage facility for spent nuclear fuels. One worker was injured, they added. But Grossi stressed that continue fighting close to Zaporizhzhia risked the safety and security of the plant and “must be avoided at all costs".

Russia's Interfax news agency said that Ukrainian forces fired the shells and that they only hit one of the site's administration buildings. What's the background? This is the second time there have been reports of missile fire at the plant since the war began. In the early hours of 4 March, soon after the Russians invaded, a missile hit a training building and set it on fire. The Ukraine State Emergency Service soon reported that operators had shut down one of the nuclear reactors as a precaution, but radiation levels were normal and no key infrastructure had been damaged. Zaporizhzhia is home to six nuclear reactors, making it the largest plant in Europe.” He added that the power plant is undergoing a “catalogue of things that should never be happening in any nuclear facility” Ukraine's state nuclear power company Energoatom blamed Russia for the damage at the power station and the country’s president Volodymyr Zelensky has warned that an explosion at Zaporizhzhia could be “the end of Europe” .

It has a capacity of six gigawatts, which is enough energy to power four million homes and sits near the Dnipro River in southwest Ukraine. Experts believe only three of the reactors have been in use since the Russians invaded, with Ukrainian staff still working there - but under duress. Reactors could 'withstand a plane crash' The reactor is the heart of any nuclear power plant. Here, controlled nuclear reactions create enough heat to turn water into steam, which is then used to create energy. There are two types - boiling water reactors and pressurised water reactors.

Zaporizhzhia is home to the latter, which are much safer than the former ones used at the Chernobyl site, where the 1986 disaster resulted in a huge radiation leak and dozens of direct and indirect deaths. Professor Claire Corkhill, chair in nuclear material degradation at the University of Sheffield, told Sky News:"After Chernobyl, there were lots of lessons learned. "One of the main ones was that reactors should be contained in very robust buildings, so now they are built in huge reinforced concrete containers. "A plane could fly into those buildings and they wouldn't be damaged." The reactors also feature built-in fire defences and if the electricity supply to them fails, they have back-up generators powered by diesel that last around three days.

Image: Other infrastructure still at risk There are still other parts of the plant that are vulnerable to damage, however. Once the radioactive fuel inside the reactor has been used to its full capacity it is placed in a large cooling pond for around two years before being transferred to a dry storage facility. According to Ukrainian nuclear regulator Energoatom, Saturday's strikes damaged three radiation monitors at one of the storage facilities for spent fuel. Professor Corkhill says:"A missile strike to the cooling pond building is of concern as the water is highly radioactive and a leak could spread radioactivity in the local area. Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player 2:51 Petro Poroshenko warns of Zaporizhzhia "A strike to the dry cask storage is less concerning, as the nuclear fuel is well protected by thick metal and concrete containers.

" But as Tony Roulstone, lecturer in nuclear energy at Cambridge University, warns, a direct strike on either could still cause a leak. "Those reinforcements are not designed against military grade-weapons," he said. "This plant has got caught up in a war zone - and nuclear power and warfare don't mix." Each strike removes a vital safety defence When Friday's shelling hit a power line to the plant, the reactor was shut down as a safety measure. But Mr Roulstone cautions that in the context of a war, once on-site diesel supplies run out, getting more could prove difficult.

"There are in-depth defences at any nuclear power plant," he said. "But when you have collateral damage, you remove one or more of those defences and therefore increase the risk." Podcast .