Martin Luther King's family 'inspired' by Britain's Black Lives Matter movement

6/12/2020 11:00:00 PM

Martin Luther King's family 'inspired' by Britain's Black Lives Matter movement

Martin Luther King Jr., Black Lives Matter

Martin Luther King's family 'inspired' by Britain's Black Lives Matter movement

EXCLUSIVE: Martin Luther King III, his wife Arndrea Waters and Daughter Yolanda say they have felt supported and inspired by the protests in the UK following the death of George Floyd

Four thousand miles away, a family in Atlanta, Georgia, in the US, ­huddled around their TV screen and watched Britain’s Black Lives Matter protests unfold.Martin Lewis is urging Brits looking to take advantage of a bargain to be careful if they plan to book to go on holiday this year.21:14, Thu, Jun 11, 2020 | UPDATED: 23:02, Thu, Jun 11, 2020 0 has given his top tips on how to save on energy bills.22:10, Thu, Jun 11, 2020 | UPDATED: 22:35, Thu, Jun 11, 2020 0 The Winds of Winter is a book many people have been desperately waiting for.

What they saw made their spirits soar. This trio had watched repeatedly over the past fortnight with a combination of pride and hope – and fear, when violence flared – as similar protests reacting to the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota, swelled across America, including a few miles from their home. It comes as thousands of restless Brits stuck at home have booked to go abroad this year. But there was something particularly powerful about the largely peaceful UK scenes. During the coronavirus crisis, he has given advice on how to deal with the financial impact of the pandemic. “What was so encouraging to me was the crowds weren’t all black Britons marching – you had black Britons, a lot of white Britons, Asian Britons, you had a real cross-section of people coming together in Britain saying, ‘This is enough,”’ explains Arndrea Waters King. But Ryanair boss Michael O'Leary said this week that "thousands" of British and Irish holidaymakers had booked foreign holiday in the last ten days. “We have felt supported and inspired by what we have seen in the UK,” adds her husband, Martin Luther King III. He posted: “If there is a silver lining in these clouds, this will give me more time to finish WINDS OF WINTER.

This family, of course, has especial reason to be buoyed by the global demos they are seeing in the face of 46-year-old Floyd’s death on May 25, which ­exemplifies deep-rooted discrimination across the US, and the world. It comes as major airlines such as easyJet and Ryanair have both announced major summer sales for flights in July and August. READ MORE: Martin Lewis: The expert shared his top tips on how to save money (Image: GETTY/ITV) Martin Lewis: He spoke to customers with EDF energy (Image: ITV) The financial expert said EDF energy customers could save £300 by making a change. Human rights advocate Mr King is the son of Dr Martin Luther King Jr, whose campaign for civil rights for African Americans was brought to a tragic halt 52 years ago with his assassination by James Earl Ray, on April 4, 1968. And 12-year-old Yolanda, sitting serious next to her parents, is the iconic figure’s only grandchild, who wishes she could have met her “Papa King” and “sat on his knee”. Currently, all arrivals into the UK, bar a few, will need to quarantine for 14 days. Poignantly, she turned 12 the day Floyd died – and more than ever, feeling confused and angry, she would love to speak to her grandfather. "I've said before that energy prices are rock bottom right now so it's a good time to do a comparison. In the UK, protests have at times turned to violence. As it stands, countries such as Spain, which are set to allow international tourists from July 1, have warned that Brits might not be allowed due to the countries poor coronavirus record. However, in a blog post, Martin replied to this, saying: “If I don’t have THE WINDS OF WINTER in hand when I arrive in New Zealand for Worldcon 2020, you have here my formal written permission to imprison me in a small cabin on White Island, overlooking that lake of sulfuric acid, until I’m done.

Last weekend crowds in Bristol tore down a statue of slave trader Edward Colston. While the Kings do not condone violence, they ­advocate a different way, but are empathetic. If you do book and your trip is cancelled, you will be due a refund but this could come with delays. “I always believe there is a way to get things done, the right way, but people are emotionally ­frustrated right now. I certainly concur with the spirit,” says Mr King, 62. But if your trip does go ahead but the Foreign Office advice hasn't changed, you're unlikely to secure a refund as insurers won't cover you. “These statues belong in museums.

The public has to acknowledge its history. The guide advises: "So first see if you can book something with cancellation rights - effectively just reserve a room and a price, which some hotels give. I just don’t believe they are symbols that represent unification of communities so don’t belong on the outside. They don’t belong in places of honour." If that option is too expensive, Martin says you have two options - take a punt or wait and see. “My father used to say a riot is the language of the unheard, and while he never condoned violence he certainly ­understood why people would protest with violence, why they were forced to violence.” The family point out the UK’s slave trade history is tied to ­America’s, and agree there are similarities between racism faced here, and in their country. But the more you're set to lose, the more cautious you should be.

Although they also highlight Brexit as a specific catalyst for division. “The vote was a vote that emboldened a racist attitude, to say others are not important, it’s all about us, we need to disconnect from people, target­ ­immigrants,” believes Mr King.. There is also a disturbing parallel to be drawn between racist comments made by their president, and racist language previously used by our PM. The couple say while Donald Trump isn’t listening, Boris Johnson must. Mrs King says: “I’d hope he’d use this moment to listen to his people, make atonement for where he has made errors, and try to build a better society for all Britain.

He has an opportunity to be a different type of leader to what we have witnessed here. “I believe he has a brand new baby? I’d hope he would be cognisant of what type of world he wants for his child and all British children.” Mr King describes how his family were all “brought to tears, anger, ­frustration and hostility” when they watched the video showing Floyd pleading for breath as police officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for almost nine minutes. Chauvin faces charges of second-degree murder and manslaughter, while three other officers are charged with aiding and abetting murder. Initially, he admits he couldn’t bear to watch the “heinous act”.

“We saw the life come out of this human being who could not do anything,” he says, a rare flash of anger. He believes police discrimination against African-Americans would not exist if his father had not been shot. Mr King, aged 10 when his dad died, recalls racial harassment. “Every now and then one of us would pick up the phone and people would make very nasty threats using the N-word, or tell us to ‘get out’,” he says. Yet he was taken on marches with his dad and witnessed the strength of feeling he galvanised.

“I travelled with my dad eight or 10 times, and marched two or three times, but I didn’t see any violence,” he recalls. “If my father had lived and others, we’d be in a different world.” I ask whether as an adult, he has experienced racism. Yolanda whispers in his ear, urging him to speak out. He describes times white colleagues have been treated ­differently, served first, adding: “I’ve been called the N-word, particularly when I was young.

” George Floyd death Mr King admits: “I am very concerned for Yolanda’s future, but I am hopeful now because of the demonstrations. I do believe we are embarking upon monumental change. “I don’t think the nation has a choice, and I hope the change ­reverberates all round the world. “I think my father’s dream will become closer to becoming reality.” .

Read more:
The Mirror »

I want drugs and cheap too. Drugs for all and we will stop hate. BZRRRRRRRRRRRGFHHHHHHHHHH Are they really.

Martin Lewis issues warning if you're booking bargain holiday and flightsThe Money Saving Expert has given key advice for sun starved Brits looking to take advantage of cheap holidays abroad as airlines prepare to resume flights soon Avoid TUiTheyll take your money........ BorisHasFailedBritain BorisHasFailedBritain BorisHasFailedBritain BorisHasFailedBritain BorisHasFailedBritain BorisHasFailedBritain BorisHasFailedBritain BorisHasFailedBritain BorisHasFailedBritain BorisHasFailedBritain BorisHasFailedBritain BorisHasFailedBritain

Martin Lewis shares 'no-brainer' way to save hundreds of pounds on energy bills - act fastMARTIN LEWIS is the Money Saving Expert who will regularly share tips to help Britons save money. Tonight, he appeared on screen to explain how to save £300 on energy bills.

Winds of Winter release date: The promise George RR Martin made about ASOIAF bookWINDS OF WINTER is the upcoming book from George RR Martin - but he made a promise to fans which will make them certain the book is coming out soon.

Martin Lewis blasts ‘disgusting scam’ for announcing he has died and 'upsetting' friendsMARTIN LEWIS - who is best known for his money-saving advice - has slammed a 'disgusting scam' for announcing that he has died in a furious Twitter post after the star received messages from his friends who were 'upset' by the advert. Great News!!! Chinese researchers developing a COVID19 vaccine say it showed promise in animal trials... produced antibodies that fought against the coronavirus in monkeys, rats, guinea pigs and rabbits....

Martin Lewis shares how EDF energy customers can save £300 on energy billsMARTIN LEWIS is the Money Saving Expert who will regularly share tips to help Britons save money. Tonight, he appeared on screen to explain how to save £300 on energy bills.

Martin Lewis issues warning to thousands of female State Pensioners missing out on cashMARTIN LEWIS uses his knowledge and expertise to provide help to many people up and down the country. However, it is his latest stark warning to female state pensioners which is particularly important.

Four thousand miles away, a family in Atlanta, Georgia, in the US, ­huddled around their TV screen and watched Britain’s Black Lives Matter protests unfold.Martin Lewis is urging Brits looking to take advantage of a bargain to be careful if they plan to book to go on holiday this year.21:14, Thu, Jun 11, 2020 | UPDATED: 23:02, Thu, Jun 11, 2020 0 has given his top tips on how to save on energy bills.22:10, Thu, Jun 11, 2020 | UPDATED: 22:35, Thu, Jun 11, 2020 0 The Winds of Winter is a book many people have been desperately waiting for.

What they saw made their spirits soar. This trio had watched repeatedly over the past fortnight with a combination of pride and hope – and fear, when violence flared – as similar protests reacting to the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota, swelled across America, including a few miles from their home. It comes as thousands of restless Brits stuck at home have booked to go abroad this year. But there was something particularly powerful about the largely peaceful UK scenes. During the coronavirus crisis, he has given advice on how to deal with the financial impact of the pandemic. “What was so encouraging to me was the crowds weren’t all black Britons marching – you had black Britons, a lot of white Britons, Asian Britons, you had a real cross-section of people coming together in Britain saying, ‘This is enough,”’ explains Arndrea Waters King. But Ryanair boss Michael O'Leary said this week that "thousands" of British and Irish holidaymakers had booked foreign holiday in the last ten days. “We have felt supported and inspired by what we have seen in the UK,” adds her husband, Martin Luther King III. He posted: “If there is a silver lining in these clouds, this will give me more time to finish WINDS OF WINTER.

This family, of course, has especial reason to be buoyed by the global demos they are seeing in the face of 46-year-old Floyd’s death on May 25, which ­exemplifies deep-rooted discrimination across the US, and the world. It comes as major airlines such as easyJet and Ryanair have both announced major summer sales for flights in July and August. READ MORE: Martin Lewis: The expert shared his top tips on how to save money (Image: GETTY/ITV) Martin Lewis: He spoke to customers with EDF energy (Image: ITV) The financial expert said EDF energy customers could save £300 by making a change. Human rights advocate Mr King is the son of Dr Martin Luther King Jr, whose campaign for civil rights for African Americans was brought to a tragic halt 52 years ago with his assassination by James Earl Ray, on April 4, 1968. And 12-year-old Yolanda, sitting serious next to her parents, is the iconic figure’s only grandchild, who wishes she could have met her “Papa King” and “sat on his knee”. Currently, all arrivals into the UK, bar a few, will need to quarantine for 14 days. Poignantly, she turned 12 the day Floyd died – and more than ever, feeling confused and angry, she would love to speak to her grandfather. "I've said before that energy prices are rock bottom right now so it's a good time to do a comparison. In the UK, protests have at times turned to violence. As it stands, countries such as Spain, which are set to allow international tourists from July 1, have warned that Brits might not be allowed due to the countries poor coronavirus record. However, in a blog post, Martin replied to this, saying: “If I don’t have THE WINDS OF WINTER in hand when I arrive in New Zealand for Worldcon 2020, you have here my formal written permission to imprison me in a small cabin on White Island, overlooking that lake of sulfuric acid, until I’m done.

Last weekend crowds in Bristol tore down a statue of slave trader Edward Colston. While the Kings do not condone violence, they ­advocate a different way, but are empathetic. If you do book and your trip is cancelled, you will be due a refund but this could come with delays. “I always believe there is a way to get things done, the right way, but people are emotionally ­frustrated right now. I certainly concur with the spirit,” says Mr King, 62. But if your trip does go ahead but the Foreign Office advice hasn't changed, you're unlikely to secure a refund as insurers won't cover you. “These statues belong in museums.

The public has to acknowledge its history. The guide advises: "So first see if you can book something with cancellation rights - effectively just reserve a room and a price, which some hotels give. I just don’t believe they are symbols that represent unification of communities so don’t belong on the outside. They don’t belong in places of honour." If that option is too expensive, Martin says you have two options - take a punt or wait and see. “My father used to say a riot is the language of the unheard, and while he never condoned violence he certainly ­understood why people would protest with violence, why they were forced to violence.” The family point out the UK’s slave trade history is tied to ­America’s, and agree there are similarities between racism faced here, and in their country. But the more you're set to lose, the more cautious you should be.

Although they also highlight Brexit as a specific catalyst for division. “The vote was a vote that emboldened a racist attitude, to say others are not important, it’s all about us, we need to disconnect from people, target­ ­immigrants,” believes Mr King.. There is also a disturbing parallel to be drawn between racist comments made by their president, and racist language previously used by our PM. The couple say while Donald Trump isn’t listening, Boris Johnson must. Mrs King says: “I’d hope he’d use this moment to listen to his people, make atonement for where he has made errors, and try to build a better society for all Britain.

He has an opportunity to be a different type of leader to what we have witnessed here. “I believe he has a brand new baby? I’d hope he would be cognisant of what type of world he wants for his child and all British children.” Mr King describes how his family were all “brought to tears, anger, ­frustration and hostility” when they watched the video showing Floyd pleading for breath as police officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for almost nine minutes. Chauvin faces charges of second-degree murder and manslaughter, while three other officers are charged with aiding and abetting murder. Initially, he admits he couldn’t bear to watch the “heinous act”.

“We saw the life come out of this human being who could not do anything,” he says, a rare flash of anger. He believes police discrimination against African-Americans would not exist if his father had not been shot. Mr King, aged 10 when his dad died, recalls racial harassment. “Every now and then one of us would pick up the phone and people would make very nasty threats using the N-word, or tell us to ‘get out’,” he says. Yet he was taken on marches with his dad and witnessed the strength of feeling he galvanised.

“I travelled with my dad eight or 10 times, and marched two or three times, but I didn’t see any violence,” he recalls. “If my father had lived and others, we’d be in a different world.” I ask whether as an adult, he has experienced racism. Yolanda whispers in his ear, urging him to speak out. He describes times white colleagues have been treated ­differently, served first, adding: “I’ve been called the N-word, particularly when I was young.

” George Floyd death Mr King admits: “I am very concerned for Yolanda’s future, but I am hopeful now because of the demonstrations. I do believe we are embarking upon monumental change. “I don’t think the nation has a choice, and I hope the change ­reverberates all round the world. “I think my father’s dream will become closer to becoming reality.” .