New York City, Nypd

New York City, Nypd

Witnesses Ignore Elderly Asian Woman Punched and Kicked in Broad Daylight in NYC

A male suspect approached the 65-year-old Asian woman, punched and repeatedly kicked her in the head before fleeing the scene.

31/3/2021 11:30:00 AM

A male suspect approached the 65-year-old Asian woman, punched and repeatedly kicked her in the head before fleeing the scene.

A 65-year-old Asian woman has been hospitalized after being helplessly assaulted in New York City on Monday while bystanders ignored her. The incident, which was caught on video, occurred just before noon outside an apartment building at 360 West 43rd Street in Midtown Manhattan, according to The New York Times. NYPD says 65-year-old Asian American woman was walking to church this morning when suspect assaulted her and said “f*** you, you don’t belong here.”

AdEine Investition von € 250 in diese Unternehmen könnte Ihnen ein zweites Einkommen bringenPropertyGuruSubletting your HDB flat isn’t an unusual practice, but are you doing these 11 mistakes?2 days agoSouth China Morning PostChinese branch of Better Cotton Initiative challenges headquarters and says it has found no evidence of Xinjiang forced labour

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The Chinese branch of an organisation set up to promote good practice in the cotton industry has publicly split with its headquarters over claims of forced labour in Xinjiang, insisting that it has found no evidence it is taking place. The rift between the Better Cotton Initiative’s headquarters in Geneva and the Shanghai branch, whose claims were heavily promoted by Chinese state media, highlights the difficulty international organisations face when dealing with sensitive topics such as Xinjiang and Hong Kong that Beijing insists are purely internal matters. In a report aired by state broadcaster China Central Television on Saturday, Wu Yan, the head of the BCI’s Shanghai branch, said: “In response to overseas claims about forced labour concerns in Xinjiang, we have repeatedly conducted stringent inspections and submitted two of our investigation reports and compiled years of reports from third-party visits.Do you have questions about the biggest topics and trends from around the world? Get the answers with SCMP Knowledge, our new platform of curated content with explainers, FAQs, analyses and infographics brought to you by our award-winning team. “We have also repeatedly told international non-government organisations as well as other stakeholders that we haven’t identified one single case of forced labour.” China produces 22 per cent of the world’s cotton, of which 84 per cent comes from Xinjiang, according to a report by the US-based Centre for Strategic and International Studies. Last year the BCI’s central office said independent research had corroborated its own conclusions that there was an increasing risk of forced labour on farms in Xinjiang. Two statements, issued in October and December but since deleted from its website, also said that it had stopped licensing Xinjiang cotton production last March and had stopped field-level activities in China in October. But the Shanghai office published two statements on the Chinese social media platform WeChat this month saying it had not found any evidence of forced labour in Xinjiang since audits began in 2012. When asked for comment, Joe Woodruff, BCI’s London-based communications manager, did not address the contradictory positions but said the group had a “constructive dialogue” with stakeholders in China. Huawei removes Nike and Adidas from its app store amid Xinjiang boycott “BCI is committed to promoting sustainable agriculture everywhere cotton is grown, including in China. In partnership with qualified local actors, we run field programmes which aim to deliver positive, measurable change to the environment and to the livelihoods and well-being of farming communities,” Woodruff said. “In China, we are currently focusing our efforts on the provinces of Hubei, Hebei, Shandong and Gansu. BCI supports over 100,000 smallholder farmers in these provinces. We are engaging in a constructive dialogue with all interested local actors across China.” Wu has not responded to requests for comment. After the BCI stopped licensing Xinjiang cotton production, its members, including H&M, Nike, Adidas and Burberry, all said they had stopped using cotton from Xinjiang in line with the group’s guidelines. But last week, these firms’ statements on the matter were revived as part of a state-backed campaign on Chinese social media calling for a boycott of these brands. On Monday, Xu Guixiang, a Xinjiang government spokesman, warned H&M and other Western companies in a press briefing in Beijing that the “era of bullying” by foreign powers was over and wielding the “big stick of sanctions” against Xinjiang would hurt the businesses that did so. Is this the next Xinjiang product to upend global supply chains? The CCTV report and a story in Global Times, a nationalist tabloid, also tried to blame human rights organisations and Washington for manipulating the BCI. Liu Haoran, a project manager at the Shanghai branch, told CCTV that “human rights groups have asked the BCI to suspend Xinjiang cotton licensing” but did not present any evidence. Fan Di, an assistant professor with Hong Kong Polytechnic University specialising in fashion retail and marketing, said he was shocked to see such a severe internal divide within the BCI, which was designed to minimise the risk of corporate social responsibility scandals. “This method has backfired on the brand names and exposed them to even greater political maelstroms,” Fan said.Fan said the international firms should have conducted their own independent audits and carried out first-hand investigations rather than relying on a third-party service supplier like the BCI. Fan said he could understand the “strategic considerations” behind the decision to suspend licensing for Xinjiang cotton before the controversy affected supply chains. “With inadequate information to make an informed decision, they might think it’s better to suspend Xinjiang’s cotton assurance before it’s too late,” Fan added. Frank Hoffer, a research fellow at the Global Labour University and a former International Labour Organization official, said investigating and verifying allegations of human rights violations would be difficult and sensitive in authoritarian countries.“Investigators may face limits on their movements and workers are likely to be hesitant in speaking up as they might be fearful or intimidated,” Hoffer said.Hoffer said the BCI’s Shanghai office would also have considered the repercussions on speaking out about forced labour.“It’s a judgment call in terms of what can still be done under the given political circumstances,” he said. Washington condemns China’s ‘baseless sanctions’ over Xinjiang Human rights groups, the United Nations and victim testimonials have accused China of detaining about a million Uygurs and other Muslim minorities in camps, where they have allegedly been subjected to indoctrination, torture and forced labour. US Secretary of State Antony Blinken and a motion passed by the Canadian parliament have both described Beijing’s policies in the region as “genocide”. China denies the allegations and insists the camps are used for vocational training and to counter extremism. Additional reporting by Linda LewMore from South China Morning Post:Xinjiang cotton dispute: the ‘era of bullying China’ is over, officials warn the WestHuawei removes Nike and Adidas from its app store amid Xinjiang cotton controversyChinese boycott against Nike and Adidas over Xinjiang cotton appears to be losing steamXinjiang cotton row: Nike’s ties with Chinese sport too hard to cutThis article Chinese branch of Better Cotton Initiative challenges headquarters and says it has found no evidence of Xinjiang forced labour first appeared on South China Morning PostFor the latest news from the South China Morning Post download our mobile app. Copyright 2021.

2 days agoA multi-billion dollar criminal lending scheme resulted in 89 deaths in China: CCTVA gang of loan sharks in China caused the deaths of 89 people after the crime ring hired debt collection companies to harass and intimidate borrowers who had no feasible avenue to pay off their obligations, according to Chinese state broadcaster CCTV. The gang, headed by a man named Wang Tao and based in the city of Lanzhou, in the northwestern province of Gansu, inked 3.36 million contracts with 475,000 people between March 2018 and March 2019. The loan sharks gave out 6.27 billion yuan (US$960 million) of illegal loans. After interest, Wang’s gang had been repaid 9.11 billion yuan (US$1.4 billion) and owned an outstanding debt of 9.84 billion (US$1.5 billion), according to accounting books presented at the trials. Do you have questions about the biggest topics and trends from around the world? Get the answers with SCMP Knowledge, our new platform of curated content with explainers, FAQs, analyses and infographics brought to you by our award-winning team. The gang implemented aggressive collection tactics blended with vicious interest rate schemes, believed to have contributed to the suicides of 89 people in China. Wang’s illegal enterprise lured unsuspecting borrowers with enticing terms such as “interest-free for seven days” or “low threshold, fast loans” in contracts that often resulted in annual interest rates of between 1,303 per cent to 5,214 per cent if the borrower could not pay off their debt quickly. According to Experian, a credit rating agency, the average interest rate for an above-board personal loan is 9.4 per cent. The crime ring, which had no lending license, would also issue what police call “trap loans,” which did not include terms for defaulting, which sometimes resulted in borrowers selling their properties to pay off debts. The documentary said, “The fundamentals of the loan, also known as a trap loan, is you can not pay it off at all even though you go bankrupt. Under the disguise of a legal loan, every loan is a debt stained with blood.” The fraudulent company hired 24 debt collection companies that harassed, threatened and intimated victims and their family members for a commission. Authorities say this intimidation directly resulted in some victims taking their own lives. One victim in Sichuan province who could not pay off her debts committed suicide with her husband. Another woman in Qinghai followed a similar fate. The CCTV documentary aired footage of a man who, during his final video clip, said he wanted to “die as a relief” from the burden his debts had created. The scheme caught the eye of authorities in December 2018, and in March 2019 253 people were detained during a dragnet across the three provinces of Gansu, Shaanxi and Anhui. Dark side of China’s organised crime crackdown revealed in private lender case Wang was sentenced to life in prison while his top lieutenants received anywhere from five to 20-year sentences during a series of trials that ended in September 2020. The official indictment against Wang has not been released to the public, but other cases related to the scheme paint a clear picture of how Wang built his empire. The apps and websites would lure people into the platform where the victim would input their personal information as well as phone contacts or phone call records. Wang’s crew would often target the same people with companies that appeared different but were all within his criminal spider web. A person would borrow from one of Wang’s “companies” to pay the debt in another. The loans often included a 30 per cent “service charge.” So, if someone took out a 1,000 yuan (US$152) contract, they would only receive a 700 yuan (US$107) deposit. Then, if the loan was not paid in seven days, the borrower would be charged a 10 per cent daily compound interest based on the 1,000 yuan (US$152) contract value. Authorities say the gang would often forge the paperwork to increase the value of the contract to make the interest rate worth more money. One victim said he borrowed 2,000 yuan (US$305) at the beginning and was told to apply for loans in other apps to pay back this loan, which eventually led to a 700,000 yuan (US$107,000) debt. The man said he was coerced and threatened every day and eventually his family sold their apartment to pay off the gang.More from South China Morning Post:China’s crackdown on housing speculators buying property with consumer loans cools down pricesChina’s banking regulator admonishes Xiaomi-backed online bank XW Bank for charging 30 per cent service fee on consumer loansChina bans microlenders from offering consumer loans to college students to curb over-lendingBad idea to offer loans when jobs are hard to come by in Hong KongThis article A multi-billion dollar criminal lending scheme resulted in 89 deaths in China: CCTV first appeared on South China Morning PostFor the latest news from the South China Morning Post download our mobile app. Copyright 2021. headtopics.com

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America is traditionally a racist country. It will always be. Just wish that it won't get even worse. There is an epidemic of blacks beating up asians. Asians stay safe!