Sanctioning Russia now over Ukraine would undercut deterrence: Blinken

23/1/2022 6:50:00 PM

Sanctioning Russia now over Ukraine would undercut deterrence: Blinken

https://str.sg/wA7QWASHINGTON (REUTERS, AFP) - United States Secretary of State Antony Blinken on Sunday (Jan 23) rebuffed the idea of imposing economic sanctions on Russia now, saying that doing so would undercut the West's ability to deter potential Russian aggression against Ukraine.

Russia's massing of troops near its border with Ukraine has sparked Western concerns that it may invade. If Russia does make an incursion, the West has threatened sanctions with far-reaching economic effects.Russia is already subject to some sanctions since its 2014 annexation of Crimea from its neighbour.

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Sanctioning Russia now over Ukraine would undercut deterrence: US's BlinkenWASHINGTON: US Secretary of State Antony Blinken on Sunday (Jan 23) rebuffed the idea of imposing economic sanctions on Russia now, saying that doing so would undercut the West\u0027s ability to deter potential Russian aggression against Ukraine. Russia\u0027s massing of troops near its border with Ukraine has

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Sanctioning Russia now over Ukraine would undercut deterrence: US's BlinkenWASHINGTON: US Secretary of State Antony Blinken on Sunday (Jan 23) rebuffed the idea of imposing economic sanctions on Russia now, saying that doing so would undercut the West\u0027s ability to deter potential Russian aggression against Ukraine. Russia\u0027s massing of troops near its border with Ukraine has

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Commentary: How Russia's armed conflict in Ukraine can play outWhile there is a clear power disparity between the two neighbours, a potential war would not be a walk in the park for Moscow, says an observer.

Copy to clipboard https://str.sg/wA7Q WASHINGTON (REUTERS, AFP) - United States Secretary of State Antony Blinken on Sunday (Jan 23) rebuffed the idea of imposing economic sanctions on Russia now, saying that doing so would undercut the West's ability to deter potential Russian aggression against Ukraine. Russia's massing of troops near its border with Ukraine has sparked Western concerns that it may invade. If Russia does make an incursion, the West has threatened sanctions with far-reaching economic effects. Russia is already subject to some sanctions since its 2014 annexation of Crimea from its neighbour. Moscow has said it has no plans to invade Ukraine. "When it comes to sanctions, the purpose of those sanctions is to deter Russian aggression. And so if they are triggered now, you lose the deterrent effect," Mr Blinken told CNN's State Of The Union programme in an interview. Mr Blinken said if one more Russian force entered Ukraine in an aggressive manner, that would trigger a significant response. Asked if US hands were tied over Ukraine because of its need for Russian support in separate talks on reining in Iran's nuclear programme, Mr Blinken, speaking to CBS' Face The Nation programme, replied:"Not in the least." Meanwhile, Germany’s leader has urged Europe and the US to think carefully when considering sanctions against Russia for any aggression against Ukraine in a crisis pitting Berlin’s main gas supplier against its biggest security allies. Among a range of possible Western sanctions against President Vladmir Putin’s government, Germany could halt the Nord Stream 2 pipeline from Russia if it invades Ukraine. But that would risk exacerbating a gas supply crunch in Europe that has caused energy prices to soar. “Prudence dictates choosing measures that will have the greatest effect on those who violate the jointly agreed principles,” German Chancellor Olaf Scholz Scholz was quoted as saying by the Sueddeutsche Zeitung newspaper on Sunday. “At the same time, we have to consider the consequences this will have for us,” Mr Scholz added, saying that nobody should think there was a measure available without consequences for Germany. According to a pre-release of the interview, Mr Scholz also countered any impression that the US and Europe could not agree on a joint set of sanctions. “In the circle of allies, we agree on possible measures. It’s good. We have to be able to act in case of an emergency,” he said. The European Union has threatened massive sanctions and US Senate Democrats have unveiled a bill to potentially punish Russian officials, military leaders and banking institutions. Mr Scholz rejected a demand by Russia to rule out once and for all Ukraine’s membership of the Nato transatlantic military alliance. “Such a guarantee can’t be given,” the chancellor said. But he did say that Nato membership of other nations in eastern Europe was “currently not on the agenda at all”. Mr Blinken on Sunday said he has no doubts that Germany is maintaining a united front with Nato on the Ukraine crisis. “I can tell you that the Germans very much share our concerns and are resolute and being determined to respond – and to respond swiftly, effectively, and in a united way,” Mr Blinken said on NBC talk show “Meet the Press”. “I have no doubts about that," he added. More On This Topic