Myanmar, Aung San Suu Kyi, Beauty Pageant, Han Lay, Miss Grand International

Myanmar, Aung San Suu Kyi

Myanmar beauty queen speaks out against military coup

Myanmar beauty queen speaks out against military coup

25/3/2021 5:06:00 PM

Myanmar beauty queen speaks out against military coup

A commitment to 'world peace' might be a beauty pageant cliche, but as blood spills in the streets of Myanmar , Miss Grand International contestant Han Lay made a plea Thursday to end the violence in her homeland.

AdWarum warten? Entdecken Sie jetzt Europas meistgekauften Crossover zum Leasingangebot mit 0 % Zinsen und 0 € Anzahlung.South China Morning PostUS, China look to shore up ties with allies after Alaska clashThe United States and China are moving to bolster relations with their respective allies and partners, on the heels of talks in Alaska that laid bare the deep rift between the two powers. After last week’s fiery exchange between US Secretary of State Antony Blinken and China’s top diplomat Yang Jiechi in Anchorage, Blinken met his Nato counterparts in Brussels on Tuesday, telling them the transatlantic security alliance should be “focused on some of the challenges that China poses to the rules-based international order”. US President Joe Biden will join the European Union’s minister meetings by video link on Thursday to discuss revitalising ties between the US and Europe, along with shared foreign policy interests including on China and Russia.Do you have questions about the biggest topics and trends from around the world? Get the answers with SCMP Knowledge, our new platform of curated content with explainers, FAQs, analyses and infographics brought to you by our award-winning team. The talks follow the Alaska confrontation, where Blinken stressed “deep concerns” over Beijing’s repression in Xinjiang and Hong Kong as well as economic coercion of US allies, and Yang slammed Washington for exercising “long-arm jurisdiction and suppression” and over human rights. While the two sides agreed to set up a working group on climate change, the fireworks showed they remain far apart on issues such as human rights and China’s actions in cyberspace. Meanwhile, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi returned home from the Alaska meeting to host his Russian counterpart Sergey Lavrov in the southern city of Guilin on Monday and Tuesday, with the two sides agreeing to “work together against sanctions” from the US and its allies. “[Western powers] should know that the days when they can arbitrarily interfere in China’s internal affairs by making up stories and lies are long gone,” Wang was quoted as saying during the talks. The two foreign ministers also addressed their respective relations with the US, calling on Washington to “reflect on the damage it has done to global peace and development in recent years, halt unilateral bullying, stop meddling in other countries’ domestic affairs and stop forming small circles to seek bloc confrontation”, according to a statement from China’s foreign ministry. Wang will also begin a tour of the Middle East on Wednesday until March 30, in a bid to boost ties in the oil-rich region that is key to China’s energy security. The foreign minister will travel to Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Iran, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Oman. Liu Weidong, a US affairs specialist from the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, said it was not clear whether China’s recent foreign policy activities were related to the combative environment at the Alaska talks since the meeting with Russia’s foreign minister was likely planned well in advance. Alaska summit: what the US and China agree on, and what still divides them But Liu said Biden’s government had already made clear it wanted to coordinate with allies, and the Alaska meeting may have hardened its inclination to do so, faced with a more aggressive Beijing that was unwilling to make concessions. “Right now, they are just aligned on public opinion and on some issues like human rights, but the impact on China is not big,” he said. “In the future, there may be more substantial coordination on economic issues, or those in the South China Sea or Taiwan, which would put greater pressure on China and have a larger impact.” While Beijing has called for a strategic reset with the new administration, relations between the world’s two largest economies continue to be strained over a host of issues, even as Biden’s team has signalled some room for cooperation in areas such as climate change. There have also been growing tensions between China and other Western democracies, with coordinated sanctions from the EU, the US, Canada and Britain over Beijing’s repression of ethnic minorities in Xinjiang, which Beijing countered with its own sanctions on the EU. Washington has made clear that it will work closely with allies to address its strategic focus on China, with State Department spokesman Ned Price releasing statements on Tuesday backing the concerns of allies Canada and the Philippines. Price expressed worries over the lack of transparency in trials for Canadians Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig, who were detained in China in what was seen as a retaliatory measure for Canada’s detention of Chinese tech executive Meng Wanzhou on a US extradition request. In a separate statement, he also called on Beijing to stop using its military militia to “intimidate and provoke others”, over concerns in the Philippines about a Chinese naval presence near the disputed Whitsun Reef in the South China Sea.More from South China Morning Post:US envoy John Kerry takes part in climate change summit co-hosted by China‘We’re in it together’, Antony Blinken tells Nato after flurry of China sanctionsChina, Russia agree to work together against ‘illegitimate’ sanctionsUS, EU, UK, Canada launch sanctions blitz against Chinese officials; Beijing hits backThis article US, China look to shore up ties with allies after Alaska clash first appeared on South China Morning PostFor the latest news from the South China Morning Post download our mobile app. Copyright 2021.

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a day agoHong Kong protests: activist charged under security law in city after release from mainland prisonA Hong Kong activist who was among the eight fugitives sent back to the city this week after serving jail time in mainland China has been charged with colluding with foreign forces under the national security law. Andy Li Yu-hin – one of 12 arrested in mainland waters last summer while trying to flee to Taiwan – was also charged on Wednesday with conspiracy to assist offenders and possession of ammunition without a licence. However, the 30-year-old did not appear in West Kowloon Court, where the case was heard, as he had to undergo two weeks of coronavirus quarantine following his return from a Shenzhen detention centre.Do you have questions about the biggest topics and trends from around the world? Get the answers with SCMP Knowledge, our new platform of curated content with explainers, FAQs, analyses and infographics brought to you by our award-winning team. Nor did Li’s lawyers appear before presiding Chief Magistrate Victor So Wai-tak, one of the judges handpicked by city leader Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor to oversee security law proceedings. Eight fugitives sent back to Hong Kong, lawyer hits out at ‘secretive’ police Senior public prosecutor Ivan Cheung Cheuk-kan acknowledged Li’s legal representatives were absent, but did not explain why. He also declined to identify Li’s counsel when pressed by journalists outside the court. The magistrate postponed the case to next Wednesday, and exempted Li from attending the next hearing. Li will complete his time in quarantine on April 4. Li was among six people arrested last August for allegedly colluding with foreign forces. Others arrested included media tycoon Jimmy Lai Chee-ying and activist Agnes Chow Ting. The prosecution accused Li of conspiring with others to ask foreign countries to impose sanctions or a blockade, or engage in other hostile activities, against Hong Kong or mainland China. The others involved in the same alleged plot include Lai, founder of Next Digital and the tabloid-style Apple Daily newspaper; his right-hand man Mark Simon; paralegal Chan Tsz-wah and activist Lau Cho-dick. Only Li and Chan have been charged over the purported scheme so far. Ten Hong Kong fugitives captured at sea jailed up to three years by Shenzhen court Li was also charged with conspiracy to assist offenders under the city’s Criminal Procedure Ordinance over the unsuccessful escape bid last summer, which prosecutors say was a separate plot in which Lai and Chan also played a part. The third charge stems from what prosecutors say was an illegal collection of spent ammunition – comprising 232 tear gas rounds, 7 foam rounds and 38 rubber baton rounds – found at a Sha Tin flat on the day of Li’s arrest.Police’s handling of Li’s case has drawn criticism from barrister Chow Hang-tung, who is helping the 12 fugitives and their families. Chow accused police on Monday of interviewing the activist in the absence of his legal representatives. She declined to give an update as to whether Li had met his lawyers when approached for comment on Tuesday. Li and seven others sent back from Shenzhen on Monday were each jailed for seven months in the mainland city for illegally crossing the border during their attempt to reach Taiwan on August 23 last year. The seven others, Cheng Tsz-ho, Cheung Chun-fu, Cheung Ming-yu, Yim Man-him, Li Tsz-yin, Kok Tsz-lun and Wong Wai-yin, all face charges stemming from the 2019 anti-government protests. Their cases were heard in four courts on Tuesday. Prosecutors asked for adjournments of up to two weeks so they could complete their time in quarantine. Of the 12 originally arrested, mainland authorities sent two underage suspects back to Hong Kong in December, while the remaining two convicted of organising the escape are still serving their sentences on the mainland.More from South China Morning Post:Beijing’s move to disbar lawyers in Hong Kong fugitives case sends a chill through mainland human rights circlesChina revokes licence of second mainland lawyer involved in case of 12 Hong Kong fugitives caught at seaMainland China human rights lawyer hired to represent Hong Kong fugitive accuses authorities of ‘framing’ him to revoke licenceMainland Chinese lawyer who helped Hong Kong fugitive in Shenzhen hits out at ‘baffling suppression’ as he faces loss of licenceTen Hong Kong fugitives captured at sea jailed up to three years by Shenzhen court, two other underage suspects handed to city’s policeThis article Hong Kong protests: activist charged under security law in city after release from mainland prison first appeared on South China Morning PostFor the latest news from the South China Morning Post download our mobile app. Copyright 2021.

a day agoBuying An Electric Car In Singapore: A Complete GuideThe journey to a smog-free atmosphere, greener future and petrol savings start with Electric Vehicles (EV). Read on for some of the perks and initial challenges of owning one before you drive home a Nissan Leaf or BMW i3. DPM Heng Swee Kiat announced in […] The post Buying An Electric Car In Singapore: A Complete Guide appeared first on SingSaver Blog - We Compare, You Save. headtopics.com

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