Indonesia, Islamic State, Extremist Group, National Police Headquarters, Suicide Bombers, Jad, Police Headquarters

Indonesia, Islamic State

IS sympathiser behind Indonesia police headquarters attack: official

On Wednesday afternoon, the 25-year-old woman wearing a niqab face veil and a long black gown entered the police complex in downtown Jakarta and opened fire on officers at the entrance.

1/4/2021 6:13:00 AM

On Wednesday afternoon, the 25-year-old woman wearing a niqab face veil and a long black gown entered the police complex in downtown Jakarta and opened fire on officers at the entrance.

An armed woman shot dead at Indonesia 's national police headquarters Wednesday was an Islamic State sympathiser, authorities said, citing social media posts she made shortly before the fatal gun battle.

AdBis zu 20.000 € Schadensersatz möglichSouth China Morning PostExtradition judge is told she, not minister, must decide if US has jurisdiction over Meng Wanzhou’s actions in Hong KongThe United States was engaged in a “power grab” that breached international law by trying to regulate Meng Wanzhou’s conduct in Hong Kong, the Huawei Technologies executive’s lawyer told her extradition hearing on Tuesday. Lawyer Gib van Ert said the judge presiding over the case, and not Canada’s justice minister, must decide whether the US had jurisdiction to bring its fraud case against Meng. “It’s not a matter that you may leave to someone else. It is a legal determination. It is a question you must answer,” lawyer Gib van Ert told Associate Chief Justice Heather Holmes in the Supreme Court of British Columbia, as he pressed the case that the US has no right to prosecute Meng under international law, and Holmes must therefore throw out the bid for her extradition to New York.Do you have questions about the biggest topics and trends from around the world? Get the answers with SCMP Knowledge, our new platform of curated content with explainers, FAQs, analyses and infographics brought to you by our award-winning team. The case showed that the US had wrongfully “given itself the power to regulate the conduct of Chinese nationals in Hong Kong”, van Ert said. Meng is accused by the US of defrauding HSBC by lying to one of its bankers in a 2013 meeting about Huawei’s business dealings in Iran, thus putting the bank at risk of breaching US sanctions. But the US has no right to prosecute Meng’s conduct, van Ert had said on Monday, because Meng is Chinese, HSBC is British and the meeting took place in a Hong Kong teahouse. US prosecutors have claimed jurisdiction because the fund transfers that allegedly resulted from Meng’s representations were cleared through US banks; her lawyers said in a written submission that this was a “wholly insufficient and artificial” connection. Jurisdiction is about where states get to exercise their power … And the United States is saying ‘we get to exercise it in Hong Kong’ Lawyer Gib van Ert Canadian government lawyers acting for US interests in the extradition case say jurisdiction is a matter to be considered mainly at trial, and by Canada’s justice minister, who ultimately will decide whether to allow Meng’s extradition, should Holmes approve it. On Tuesday, Holmes echoed that position, asking van Ert “isn’t it then more appropriate in an extradition context for the minister to be making the decision” about whether the US had “overstepped”. ‘US laws do not apply in China’: new front opens in Meng extradition fight Van Ert said this was “a legal question and not a political determination”, and if the court condoned the US request, Canada too would be in breach of customary international law. While legislatures might act in ways that breached international law, Canada’s judges must not, said van Ert. “If international law is to be violated that is to be left to politicians, not courts,” he said. He said the US had conducted a “plain power grab” by claiming jurisdiction over Meng’s conduct. “Jurisdiction is about where states get to exercise their power,” van Ert said. “And the United States is saying ‘we get to exercise it in Hong Kong, at least in circumstances where a financial transaction between a Chinese company and a British bank took place in some way that we say is connected to that’. “If that is right it is a fundamental shift in how jurisdiction is understood in international law.” If US law applied to a Chinese national in Hong Kong “that is an interference with the sovereignty of Hong Kong and China”, he said. “Ms Meng would have expected that her conduct in Hong Kong is governed by the law of Hong Kong. States around the world would have that same expectation,” van Ert said. Chaos and confusion would result if states routinely applied their laws to activities taking place elsewhere, van Ert said, and it was “self-evident” that the “United States makes law for the United States. It doesn’t make law for China. That’s the territoriality principle.” The US assertion of jurisdiction relied upon the process of dollar clearing, said van Ert, in which transfers between accounts in two non-US banks, but denominated in US dollars, may pass through their respective correspondent US banks. The US accusations against Meng cite transfers between Huawei affiliate Skycom and a British company called Networkers. Van Ert referred to an expert witness report by Regis Bismuth, a French law professor, who said that international monetary law principles “do not allow states to use their currency as a basis of jurisdiction”, even if a payment was reflected in their currency clearing system. Meng’s case involved US$2million in payments through the US dollar clearing system over 13 months, compared to US$4.5 trillion that went through the system daily, van Ert said, citing another expert report by US banking expert John Simonson. “The actual impact as a percentage [is] very nearly zero,” van Ert said, and was no basis for US jurisdiction. Ms Meng would have expected that her conduct in Hong Kong is governed by the law of Hong Kong. States around the world would have that same expectation Lawyer Gib van Ert Meng, Huawei’s chief financial officer and the eldest daughter of the company’s founder Ren Zhengfei, was arrested at the request of US authorities at Vancouver’s airport on December 1, 2018, on a stopover from Hong Kong. She has been fighting extradition ever since, in a case that has thrown China’s relations with the US and Canada into turmoil. The jurisdictional argument is one of four branches of Meng’s case that she is the victim of an “egregious” abuse of process that has violated her Canadian charter rights. Meng’s Vancouver mansions are not owned in her name, extradition case hears The other branches are that her case is a tainted political prosecution brought as leverage in a US trade war with China, that Canadian police and border guards conducted a covert criminal investigation of her to obtain evidence for the US Federal Bureau of Investigation, and that American authorities misled the Canadian court in their summaries of the case. A separate argument, that the case failed to pass the “double criminality” test – that extradition cases must involve actions that would have represented crimes had they occurred in Canada – has already been rejected by Holmes. Van Ert told Holmes on Tuesday that she found herself in an “unusual and unprecedented situation”; never before had there been a Canadian extradition case in which the request itself was contrary to international law, he asserted. If the court decided to pass on the decision about jurisdiction to the minister or ruled that the request was unlawful but did not impose a remedy, then it was “unlikely to result in the minister solving the problem … the minister will take the same view [as the court]”, van Ert suggested. Meng’s long-running extradition battle may be nearing its final stages, with hearings due to be completed on May 14, after which Holmes must decide whether to free her or approve extradition. But the final say will rest with the justice minister, and appeals could drag out the process for years. Meng’s treatment has enraged Beijing, which has repeatedly demanded her release. Two Canadians, Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, were arrested in China soon after Meng’s arrest, and this month both men were put on trial for espionage. The closed-door trials only lasted hours; no verdicts have been announced. Canada’s government regards both men as victims of “hostage diplomacy” and arbitrary detention by China.More from South China Morning Post:‘US laws do not apply in China,’ court is told, as new front opens in Meng Wanzhou extradition fightMeng Wanzhou’s Vancouver mansions are not owned in her name, extradition hearing is toldReject Meng Wanzhou’s ‘exciting narrative’ of abuse, Canadian government lawyer tells extradition judgeMeng Wanzhou’s lawyer blasts ex-Mountie for ‘shock’ refusal to testify at extradition hearingPutting Meng Wanzhou on trial would be ‘triumph for rule of law’, Canadian government lawyer saysThis article Extradition judge is told she, not minister, must decide if US has jurisdiction over Meng Wanzhou’s actions in Hong Kong first appeared on South China Morning PostFor the latest news from the South China Morning Post download our mobile app. Copyright 2021.

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a day agoJoe Biden takes action against ‘horrific violence and xenophobia’ towards Asian-AmericansUS President Joe Biden took new actions on Tuesday to push back against a recent wave of violent, racist attacks on Asian-Americans, according to the White House. “Across our nation, an outpouring of grief and outrage continues at the horrific violence and xenophobia perpetrated against Asian-American communities, especially Asian-American women and girls,” said a White House statement. The actions include building a new US task force to “ensure the federal government’s response to Covid-19 mitigates anti-Asian xenophobia and bias” and a new Justice Department programme that will collect hate crime data against Asian-Americans, as well as training law enforcement officers to spot anti-Asian bias. Do you have questions about the biggest topics and trends from around the world? Get the answers with SCMP Knowledge, our new platform of curated content with explainers, FAQs, analyses and infographics brought to you by our award-winning team. The administration also launched a new virtual library highlighting Asian-Americans’ contributions to the United States. The White House announcement comes at the end of a month that has seen repeated, violent attacks against Asian-Americans, often in public spaces in broad daylight. On Monday, a man in New York City walked up to a 65-year-old Asian-American woman, kicked her in the stomach, knocked her to the ground, and then kicked her in the head several times before walking away. Police have not yet identified the assailant. Earlier in March, eight people – six of whom were Asian women – were killed in a shooting spree in Georgia. The suspect has been charged with murder. Coronavirus: Biden, CDC chief ask Americans to mask up to avert fourth wave A report published earlier this month by the group Stop AAPI Hate documented 3,795 hate incidents targeting Asian Americans over the last year, including harassment, civil rights violations and physical violence. The group says those represent “only a fraction” of the total number of crimes that actually occur. A separate study published on Tuesday by the group AAPI Data and SurveyMonkey found that 10 per cent of Asian-American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) adults have experienced hate crimes and hate incidents in 2021 so far, higher than the national average of just 6 per cent. Also on Tuesday, US Attorney General Merrick Garland ordered the Justice Department to conduct a review of how it can best deploy its resources to stop anti-Asian hate crimes. BTS take stand against anti-Asian racism, and say they’ve been victims of it themselves In a memo to Justice Department employees, Garland cited the “recent rise in hate crimes and hate incidents, particularly the disturbing trend in reports of violence against members of the Asian-American and Pacific Islander community since the start of the pandemic.” The rise in violence and racism targeting Asian-Americans has coincided with the spread of the coronavirus pandemic, and many observers have blamed former president Donald Trump for contributing to a mood that has ultimately led to attacks. Trump had refused to stop using nicknames for the coronavirus that were widely condemned as racist against Asians, even as many Asian-Americans warned that the then-president was fanning the flames of anger against them. Frank Wu, the president of Queens College and author of the book Yellow: Race in America Beyond Black and White, said it was “wonderful” that Biden was taking action to combat anti-Asian racism. “I’ve never seen this level of response from the White House on issues affecting Asian Americans,” Wu said. “I’m grateful. We’ve used unprecedented so much as a word during this challenge. This is unprecedented in a positive sense.More from South China Morning Post:Joe Biden denounces ‘brutality’ against Asian-Americans after Atlanta spa shootingsJoe Biden seeks racial equity for Asian-Americans in wake of Donald Trump’s anti-China talkJoe Biden expected to sign executive order countering Asian-American discriminationBiden bans linking Covid-19 to China in bid to quell racist backlash in USIn first official trip as president, Joe Biden vows more vaccines, pushes for US$1.9 trillion reliefThis article Joe Biden takes action against ‘horrific violence and xenophobia’ towards Asian-Americans first appeared on South China Morning PostFor the latest news from the South China Morning Post download our mobile app. Copyright 2021.

a day agoChina-Australia relations: more than 11,000 litres of wine detained in Shenzhen as ban continuesNearly 9,000 litres of red wine from a vineyard owned by renowned Australian pearling company Paspaley Group were detained in south China last month, as Beijing’s block on Australian wine continues amid a protracted dispute between the two countries and new anti-dumping duties on the trade. Some 8,640 litres from Paspaley’s Bunnamagoo Estate winery and 2,646 litres of red wine from Australian private label supplier Lindsdale were stopped in Shenzhen for poor labelling and excessive use of additives, respectively, Chinese customs data showed. The seizure is the latest in a string of problems for Australian wine at the Chinese border and underlines Beijing’s message that it no longer wants to buy products from the country, export and import agents in China said.Do you have questions about the biggest topics and trends from around the world? Get the answers with SCMP Knowledge, our new platform of curated content with explainers, FAQs, analyses and infographics brought to you by our award-winning team. But it also reflects how lucrative the Chinese market has been for Australian wine producers that, despite an unofficial ban imposed last November and temporary anti-dumping duties put in place last month, many exporters still think they can profit, said Tony Battaglene, CEO of Australian Grape & Wine. China-Australia relations: do Beijing’s anti-dumping and anti-subsidy investigation claims hold up? Exporters’ optimism, however, suffered a setback last Friday when Chinese authorities concluded a seven-month anti-dumping investigation into cheap Australian wine and confirmed duties of between 116.2 per cent and 218.4 per cent would be slapped on wines in containers of up to two litres. The duties – higher than November’s temporary tariffs of between 107.1 per cent to 212.1 per cent – were applied for five years from last Sunday. The Chinese commerce ministry said the domestic wine industry had been hurt by the dumping of cheap Australian wine. While the decision was expected, Battaglene said the industry would now focus on driving growth in new and existing markets. Exporters had gained traction in Britain and the domestic market and were pursuing sales across Asia, Europe and the United States, he said. “Our focus now is twofold. Firstly, we’re working with industry and the Australian government to assess options available to us within the Chinese system, and internationally. And secondly, we’re focusing on growing demand for Australian wine in other markets,” he said. We continue to reject the allegations levelled against Australian Grape & Wine members Tony Battaglene “We continue to reject the allegations levelled against Australian Grape & Wine members and have approached both investigations as collaboratively and transparently as possible.” The industry group is considering lodging a complaint with the World Trade Organization through the Australian government, as the country’s barley industry has, but no decision has been made. “We are assessing options and will make a call next week,” Battaglene said. The Australian government expressed its disappointment with the anti-dumping decision, the second in the past year after duties were imposed on barley in May last year. Trade relations have deteriorated sharply between China and Australia after Canberra called for an international inquiry into the origins of the coronavirus pandemic in April last year without consulting Beijing. The two cases are among four anti-dumping cases Beijing has launched against Australia since 1995. Canberra has instigated 87 anti-dumping cases against China. Australian trade minister Dan Tehan said the trade disputes were very difficult to navigate. “We want to have a good working relationship with the Chinese Government. We want to be able to work through these disputes,” he said at a press conference in Australia over the weekend. “But, as I’ve said, steps taken like this by the Chinese Government are extremely disappointing, and we’ll take all steps we can to try and reverse them.” For wine exporters, the conflict between China and Australia has been devastating for business, with trade coming to a near complete halt. The Australian trade department said in a senate hearing last week that wine exports had fallen to less than A$1 million dollars (US$759,000) in January. Before the conflict, China imported nearly 40 per cent of Australia’s wine exports worth around A$1 billion a year. Wine Australia, a government authority, said Australia’s ability to find new markets to absorb products usually sold to China would be key to its survival in the next two years. Aside from Britain, there were also good prospects of increased exports to the US, it said. “In the year ended December 2020, sales of Australian wine increased by 9 per cent in volume in the UK off-trade market, and by 6 per cent in the USA off-trade,” Wine Australia said in a market update on Tuesday. The real supply pressure will come on towards the end of the year, if we can’t find new markets by then Tony Battaglene “The UK and USA markets, as well as the domestic market, have a higher demand for white wine, whereas almost all of Australia’s wine exports to China have been red wine.” But markets in Britain and US would not replace the large volume of wine sold to China, Battaglene said, adding the severity of the blow in China was softened by low wine stocks. Wine inventories are at an eight-year low after three years of under-supply, according to Wine Australia. “The real supply pressure will come on towards the end of the year, if we can’t find new markets by then,” Battaglene said. Neither Paspaley or Lindsdale responded to requests for comment. More from South China Morning Post:China-Australia relations: Beijing officially slaps import duties on Australian wine after concluding probeChina-Australia relations: more than 23,000 litres of wine stopped at Chinese ports as trade spat continuesChina coal: Australia ban continues to weigh on supply, imports down 40 per cent even as Russia moves to fill gapChina-Australia relations: barley dispute going to WTO as headwinds loom in Australia’s alternative marketsThis article China-Australia relations: more than 11,000 litres of wine detained in Shenzhen as ban continues first appeared on South China Morning PostFor the latest news from the South China Morning Post download our mobile app. Copyright 2021. headtopics.com

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