Krispy Kreme, Free Doughnuts, Dave Skena, Vaccination, Covıd

Krispy Kreme, Free Doughnuts

COVID vaccine motivation: Krispy Kreme giving away free donuts for showing vaccination card through end of 2021

Get free donuts through the end of 2021 at Krispy Kreme with your COVID-19 vaccination card. No purchase is required to get the freebie.

24/3/2021 9:00:00 AM

In the US, Krispy Kreme is providing a sweet incentive to encourage more people to roll up their sleeves for the COVID -19 vaccine – free doughnuts through the end of 2021.

Get free donuts through the end of 2021 at Krispy Kreme with your COVID -19 vaccination card. No purchase is required to get the freebie.

AdMachen Sie Ihre Träume wahr! Jeden Freitag befinden sich mindestens 10 Mio. € im Jackpot. Spielen Sie das Original – einfach und sicher bei LOTTO24.Yahoo News SingaporeThe Ministry of Health (MOH) has confirmed 13 new COVID-19 cases in Singapore on Tuesday (23 March), taking the country's total case count to 60,221.

Tighter COVID-19 measures important as Singapore is on a 'knife’s edge': Lawrence Wong 13 new community COVID-19 cases, including 7 linked to Changi Airport cluster Commentary: Does Singapore have to resort to 'slapstick and Singlish' to get public messages across?

23 hours agoWhy was the PLA at the China-US talks in Alaska?Members of the Chinese military were on hand at the high-level talks in Alaska last week, playing a supporting advisory role as Beijing and Washington reached consensus on various security issues. A Chinese military source said this presence indicated that Beijing was eager to develop the talks into a strategic dialogue and prevent accidental military conflicts. The source said the People’s Liberation Army offered advice on Afghanistan, Iran, North Korea, as well as efforts to prevent accidental military conflicts in the Taiwan Strait and the South China Sea.Get the latest insights and analysis from our Global Impact newsletter on the big stories originating in China. “The Chinese foreign ministry played the leading role in the Alaska talks, while the Office for International Military Cooperation also sent officials to give support,” the source said referring to the Central Military Commission department that oversees military diplomacy. “The PLA has played a role in Afghanistan, Iran, and North Korea, areas where the interests of China and the United States intersect.” China’s influence in Afghanistan is growing as Beijing has increased economic and security support for Kabul through the Belt and Road Initiative. The Taliban has negotiated with the US over sharing power in the ongoing Afghanistan peace agreement after the planned withdrawal of American troops by May 1 this year. However, the administration of US President Joe Biden has yet to announce its next steps. “The US is concerned that other great powers like China and Russia will fill the military and economic vacuum in the aftermath of US troops’ withdrawal. But Beijing is not interested in replacing American’s role in Afghanistan and the Middle East, meaning there is room for the two countries to cooperate in this area,” the source said. “The attendance of PLA officials at the Alaska talks was also aimed at showing the PLA’s desire to foster a better military-to-military relationship with its US counterpart.” Alaska summit: for China and the US, a narrow road through deep divisions Despite the US and Chinese representatives trading barbs at the start of the talks, both sides said they had a “very candid conversation” on topics where their interests intersected, including Iran, North Korea, Afghanistan and climate change. However, Chinese official media outlets described the Alaska summit as “strategic dialogue” while the US side played them down by referring to them as “high-level talks”. Drew Thompson, a former US Defence Department official and a senior research fellow at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy in Singapore, said Beijing might want to use the Alaska summit as propaganda for a domestic audience while the US preferred to focus on border strategic issues. “The Biden administration is understandably not interested in committing to high-level, structured discussions that don’t produce results and only result in lengthy harangues intended for a domestic audience,” Thomson said. The military source said the Chinese delegation also raised the possibility of resuming high-level military-to-military communication to avoid accidental military conflicts as the two armed forces increased their activities in the East and South China seas. The high-level military-to-military communication mechanism between the PLA and Pentagon was halted in November after the PLA’s failure to show up at a virtual maritime security meeting with the chief of the US Indo-Pacific Command. Shi Yinhong, an international relations professor at Renmin University, said the potential for accidental military conflicts would grow if the two sides did not resume military talks over safety engagements in the air and on the high seas. “The problem is, it seems like both sides’ leadership have other political agendas,” Shi said. However, Thomson said the professionalism of the Pentagon would help avoid any crisis from happening, even though there was no sign of any significant results from the Alaska talks.More from South China Morning Post:Alaska summit: officials’ take on ‘one-China’ reveals two opinions on TaiwanUS-China talks: Alaska clashes may be a sign of Beijing’s low short-term expectationsAlaska summit: China and US far apart on hot-button issues but agree to set up climate change group as talks endThis article Why was the PLA at the China-US talks in Alaska? first appeared on South China Morning PostFor the latest news from the South China Morning Post download our mobile app. Copyright 2021.

2 days agoSouth China Morning PostChina’s embassy in Paris attacks ‘mad dogs’ and defends Wolf Warriors in public row with French scholarChina’s embassy in France released a long screed defending its criticism of a French scholar for “anti-China provocations” and maintaining that its aggressive tactics were necessary to defend Beijing’s interests and international image. The harshly worded statement, published on the embassy’s website on Sunday, sought to justify the mission’s attack on Antoine Bondaz, a research fellow at the French think tank Foundation for Strategic Research, as a “petite frappe”, a derogatory term in French meaning “little thug”. The insult came in response to Bondaz’s tweet to the Chinese embassy offering “a big kiss to you and your trolls”, after the French foreign ministry said it would not interfere in French Senator Alain Richard’s plans to visit Taiwan this summer.Get the latest insights and analysis from our Global Impact newsletter on the big stories originating in China. “A few days ago, China’s embassy on its official Twitter account engaged in a legitimate counter-attack to provocative remarks from a so-called China expert in France, sparking the dissatisfaction of some French people and media, and causing a wave of criticism,” the embassy said in its statement, without naming Bondaz. “Freedom of speech is equal. He has the freedom to provoke the Chinese embassy and we have the freedom to counter-attack. You cannot say that just because he is a scholar, he is sacred so we cannot say anything about him and he cannot be touched.” The controversy is the latest instance of incendiary rhetoric from the Chinese embassy in France, which observers have said reflects the increasingly aggressive Wolf Warrior style of Beijing’s diplomats abroad. Why France is flexing its muscles in the South China Sea China’s ambassador to France Lu Shaye has been seen as one of the strongest embodiments of the more combative style embraced by some Chinese diplomats. China’s media has likened the diplomatic style to the nationalistic Wolf Warrior film franchise about Chinese soldiers defeating foreign mercenaries. Lu was summoned by France’s foreign office in April last year for claims by the embassy that France had left its older citizens to die during the coronavirus pandemic. In its statement on Sunday, the Chinese embassy said it was not “insulting” Bondaz, describing him as someone who “does not count as a scholar” and is “an ideological troll”. “You can see how he kneels and licks Taiwan’s government, and how he crazily opposes everything related to China, constantly pestering the Chinese embassy,” it said. “If China’s national interests and image have been threatened or harmed, then our embassy must rush out to safeguard it at all costs.” The embassy compared the label of Wolf Warrior applied to Chinese diplomats with “mad dogs who are too aggressive, including some ‘mad dogs’ who use their status as scholars or the media to crazily attack China”. “Some people want China’s diplomacy to be ‘lamb diplomacy’, which is more tolerant and calm towards external attacks,” the embassy said. “This era has gone forever.” No Wolf Warriors here: foreign minister sends ‘responsible China’ message Bondaz, whose research includes a focus on China’s foreign and security policy, tweeted that the embassy’s comments were “unjustifiable”. “The embassy feels it has total impunity,” he wrote, suggesting in Chinese that the embassy “stop before it has gone too far”. In a separate tweet, the French researcher responded to an opinion piece from the Chinese state-run tabloid Global Times defending the Chinese embassy’s comments, writing that he faced “coordinated attacks” from China meant to “discredit and silence me”. “This will be a failure,” Bondaz wrote. “This will only prompt me to pursue the very research that [China] is so concerned about.”More from South China Morning Post:Alaska summit: officials’ take on ‘one-China’ reveals two opinions on TaiwanChina has factories secured against vandalism in Myanmar but how can it protect itself from anti-China sentiment?Russian foreign minister to visit China hard on heels of Alaska talksChina defends criticism of French senator’s Taiwan tripSecond Canadian, Michael Kovrig, goes on trial in China on spying charges with diplomats refused accessThis article China’s embassy in Paris attacks ‘mad dogs’ and defends Wolf Warriors in public row with French scholar first appeared on South China Morning PostFor the latest news from the South China Morning Post download our mobile app. Copyright 2021. headtopics.com

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Singapore sees ‘several important lessons’ from Tan Tock Seng Hospital COVID-19 cluster

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