Beijing, Hong Kong Protests, Hong Kong, Lay Zhang

Beijing, Hong Kong Protests

'All the forces': China's global social media push over Hong Kong protests

'All the forces': China's global social media push over Hong Kong protests

22.8.2019

'All the forces': China's global social media push over Hong Kong protests

Wang Ying has for the last four years identified herself as a diehard fan of Chinese boy band star Lay Zhang . Recently, the 17-year-old also ...

The high school student from Shanghai is among the Chinese citizens who in recent weeks have flocked to Western social media platforms such as Instagram and Twitter to criticise demonstrators in the former British colony.

She is part of a growing offensive emerging from China in recent days aimed at promoting Beijing's narrative about what is happening in Hong Kong to an overseas audience. State media outlets, Chinese celebrities and regular internet users have all banded together behind the effort.

They have paid to promote their coverage of Hong Kong on sites including Twitter and Facebook, which are banned on the mainland. The companies said Tuesday that the Chinese government has also mounted a propaganda campaign using fake accounts, thousands of which were taken down in recent days.

"It's only really the hypernationalists that are given free rein, their content isn't censored," said Fergus Ryan, an analyst at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI) who studies Chinese social media.

"(It's) not too dissimilar we've seen from Russia about 4-5 years ago in terms of very simplistic personas and the use of identical messaging across accounts," he said.

Locals shout at riot police as they chase anti-government protesters down Nathan Road in Mong Kok in Hong Kong, China. (Photo: EUTERS/Thomas Peter/Files)

Wang said she and her group of online peers, also known as 'fan girls' or 'fanquan girls', began to campaign against the protests after her idol Zhang, a member of South Korean boy band Exo, joined other Chinese celebrities last week to say that he backed the Hong Kong police and Beijing's territorial sovereignty.

They were joined by other internet denizens such as those on 'Di Bar,' a discussion forum that is part of search engine giant Baidu's platform, where calls went out to the group's 31.3 million members asking them to flood overseas social media platforms with similar slogans and posts.

State television's English-language channel CGTN, the official Xinhua news agency and the Communist Party's People's Daily have all taken to Twitter and Facebook with gusto, denouncing the protesters and putting out Beijing's voice.

Read more: CNA

Pompeo says China should respect Hong Kong protesters' rights HONG KONG (BLOOMBERG) - Secretary of State Michael Pompeo called on China to respect Hong Kong demonstrators' rights and to fulfil its pledge to uphold one country with two systems of government.. Read more at straitstimes.com.

Pompeo urges China to respect Hong Kong protesters' rightsWASHINGTON: In interviews on Tuesday (Aug 20), US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo reiterated Washington's calls for China to honour its one ...

Worker at Britain’s Hong Kong consulate is feared detained in ChinaHONG KONG — China has detained an employee of the British Consulate in Hong Kong after he crossed the border into the mainland, his family and his girlfriend said, raising fears that Chinese authorities might be targeting travellers they suspect of supporting the Hong Kong protests.

Worker at Britain’s Hong Kong consulate is feared detained in ChinaHONG KONG — China has detained an employee of the British Consulate in Hong Kong after he crossed the border into the mainland, his family and his girlfriend said, raising fears that Chinese authorities might be targeting travellers they suspect of supporting the Hong Kong protests.

Ongoing protests could drag down economies in both Hong Kong and China: Bank of East AsiaA major bank warned on Wednesday that weeks of protests in Hong Kong could hit the economies of the Chinese-ruled city and mainland China itself ...

Money, muscle, media: how China has handled Hong Kong protestsChina has deployed a three-pronged strategy to suffocate pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong -- propaganda, economic leverage and intimidation. Here is a look at Beijing 's efforts so far to squash a movement that has refused to die. - Shaping the narrative - As protests erupted in June, discussion

Write Comment

Thank you for your comment.
Please try again later.

Latest News

News

22 August 2019, Thursday News

Previous news

Rail industry needs quicker manpower boost amid rapid MRT expansion: Janil Puthucheary

Next news

Cricket: Sri Lanka to bat in second test against New Zealand
Previous news Next news