France, George Floyd, Haıtı, Haitian Revolution, Louis De Bourbon, Louis Xvı, Louisville, Napolean, Openaccess, Protests, Slavery, Statue, United States

France, George Floyd

The statue of Louis XVI should remain forever handless - The Mail & Guardian

A statue of the French king in Louisville, Kentucky was damaged during the protests against police killings. It should not be repaired

2020-06-03 06:44:00 AM

A statue of the French king in Louisville , Kentucky was damaged during the protests against police killings. It should not be repaired

A statue of the French king in Louisville , Kentucky was damaged during the protests against police killings. It should not be repaired

If I were the self-professedlast heirto the Bourbon throne, who many believe is only a pretender, I might think twice before attaching my name to the memory of a man who was part of a family that oversaw the most brutal and punishing slavocracy in the world.

WHO: There will be no return to old normal after COVID-19 pandemic WRAP | 500 South Africans infected with Covid-19 every hour, Mkhize defends alcohol ban | News24 Mask rules are not meant to ‘criminalise’ the public - The Mail & Guardian

Slavery in the French-claimed Americas began and ended with the Bourbons. The practice of kidnapping and then enslaving Africans was adopted under Louis XIII in the 17th century. TheCode Noirdecree, issued under Louis XIV to regulate France’s enormous slave system in Saint-Domingue, Guadeloupe, and Louisiana, not only mandated the expulsion of Jews from the colonies, but did very little to stop enslavers from exercising some of the cruellest tortures to be found anywhere in the Atlantic World.

Illustration depicting Francois Dominique Toussaint L’Ouverture participating in the successful revolt against French power in St. Dominique (Haiti). Hand-colored engraving.Common punishments for enslaved people — who might have dared to run away, break a tool or otherwise refuse to completely give in to their master’s will — were burning and burying them alive; severing their limbs, ears and other body parts; bleeding them to death, and nailing them to walls and trees; as well as branding and other forms of mutilation.

The revised version of theCode Noir, issued under Louis XVI, was even worse. It spelled out in no uncertain terms that enslaved people were to be treated asmeubles, or pieces of furniture, that could be bought, sold or discarded at the whim of any “owner”.

Slavery was only abolished in the French colonies after Louis XVI — over whose fake hand Louis de Bourbon is now shedding all the white tears — was notoriously beheaded by the French Jacobins in January 1793. His death, however, did not stop this family from seeking to continue its practice of enriching themselves through the enslavement of black people.

Napoleon(not a Bourbon), who had come to power in France in 1799, officially reinstated slavery in the French empire in July 1802. But revolutionaries in Saint-Domingue put up the most ardent and ultimately successful fight against slavery the world had yet seen, culminating in Haitian independence in January 1804 — enslaved people in Guadeloupe fought back, too, but they ultimately lost their struggle.

Even though Napoleon was busy fighting wars around the world, and seemed to lose sight of his loss in Saint-Domingue, successive Haitian governments remained wary that he might try to once again bring back slavery.That honour would go to the Bourbons, however, who managed to be even more delusional in this regard than Napoleon. After Napoleon was forced to abdicate his throne to them in spring 1814 — by that time, Haiti had been mired in its own civil war, which resulted in the country being split into two, with Henry Christophe ruling in the north and Alexandre Pétion ruling in the south — Louis XVIII, brother of Louis XVI, became king and immediately began to plot a reconquest of France’s erstwhile colony.

Over 3 million beneficiaries paid for the R350 grant Zulu: We are still experiencing issues with paying out relief grants WATCH: Mkhize says alcohol ban evidence-based

Under Louis XVIII’s authority, Malouet, the French minister of the marine, sent three commissioners to Haiti with the mission of coercing both Haiti’s leaders to surrender. He threatened that if they did not submit the Haitian people would be “treated as barbarous savages and hunted down like runaway slaves”. 

One of the commissioners, Dauxion-Lavaysse, even sent a letter to Christophe that unabashedly revealed in no uncertain terms that France was ready “to replace the population of Hayti, which … would be totally annihilated by the forces sent against it.” The official reconquest instructions issued by Malouet, in fact, mandated the return of slavery and the

wholesale exterminationof most of the country’s population.Although Louis XVIII’s plot was ultimately foiled by Christophe, not once, but twice — yes, Louis XVIII tried again in 1816 after the second restoration — the claim to dubious fame of his brother, Charles X, who succeeded him, was issuing the disastrous 1825 indemnity whereby the Haitian government was compelled into an agreement to pay 150-million francs

as the price of Haiti’s liberty. Charles X’s successor, cousin Louis Philippe, was no better. Indeed, he oversaw the 1838 revision to that agreement which, while reducing the total amount to be paid to 90-million francs, forced Haiti to take out high-interest loans to pay the “debt.”

Read more: Mail & Guardian »

Informative news. How hypocritical! When the EFF called for the demolition of ALL artifacts that glorify and celebrate Colonial/apartheid enterprise, you insulted the EFF will sorts of liberal opinion pieces. Now its ok to destroy statues because Americans are suffering!? Fickle!

The statue of Louis XVI should remain forever handless - The Mail & GuardianCOMMENT: A statue of the French king in Louisville , Kentucky was damaged during the protests against police killings. It should not be repaired, writes FictionsofHaiti. BlackLivesMatter

The statue of Louis XVI should remain forever handless - The Mail & GuardianCOMMENT: A statue of the French king in Louisville , Kentucky was damaged during the protests against police killings. It should not be repaired, writes FictionsofHaiti. BlackLivesMatter

EXTENDED: Nominate your top young South Africans for 2020 - The Mail & GuardianEXTENDED: Applications for the MG200Young list close on JUNE 8 2020. Nominate a 35-and-under who is showing us what to look forward to in the country’s future. Can anyone of any race be nominated?

Eastern Cape fails tracing and testing - The Mail & GuardianWith the shift to lockdown level three on Monday, details are emerging of how the previous relaxation added pressure to the already poorly performing Eastern Cape Covid-19 response This is very concerning.

Inequality manifests in stimulus - The Mail & GuardianOPINION: Structural forces mean emerging economies can’t offer the necessary Covid-19 fiscal-relief packages.

On the road with East African truck drivers - The Mail & GuardianIn East Africa, truck drivers are being attacked, robbed and used as diplomatic footballs Fake news