SA lions, pumas contracted COVID-19 from zoo workers: study

SA lions, pumas contracted COVID-19 from zoo workers: study

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2022-01-19 09:03:00 AM

SA lions, pumas contracted COVID-19 from zoo workers: study

Research led by scientists at the University of Pretoria found three lions and two pumas fell ill with coronavirus.

Lion prides in South Africa must be carefully managed to avoid overpopulation and in-breeding.AFP/Wikus de WetJOHANNESBURG - Big cats caged in zoos are at risk from catching COVID-19 from their keepers, a study said on Tuesday.Research led by scientists at the University of Pretoria found three lions and two pumas fell ill with coronavirus - and the clues point to infection by their handlers, some of whom were asymptomatic.

"Reverse zoonotic (animal-borne) transmission of COVID-19... posed a risk to big cats kept in captivity," the authors said.The investigation was launched after three lions at an unnamed private zoo in Johannesburg fell ill last year with breathing difficulties, runny noses and a dry cough.

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Ori_Debig_Beats Mandatory vaccination for all animals... Ori_Debig_Beats 🤣 🤣 🤣 🤣 🤣 🤣 🤣 Lol Please come test my neighbour's dog.. No social distancing Attending super spreader events No musk Does not sanitize No regard for curfew ‼️The alcohol abuse is unrelated though This narrative to push vaccines on people's pets needs to stop Pfizer and all its cronies from big pharma have made enough money all this flu called covid-19.

Vaccination for all animals now let's c if the animals will agree ayikhale✊ Ke that race akere? Eeeee!!!! They go to work to play with Lions kanti , Just don’t feed them cooked chicken from Woolies

Covid-19 infected lions prompt variant warning in SALions and pumas at a zoo in the South African capital of Pretoria got severe Covid-19 from asymptomatic zoo handlers, raising concerns that new variants could emerge from animal reservoirs of the disease, studies carried out by a local university showed. Poor animals to put on masks and social isolate. They need to think of new kak because the old narrative is running dry.

Hai fokof Where they playing hide n seek with them Lions and Pumas U people are suffering from a slave master syndrome. This majestic wild animals do NOT belong in a cage or zoo. TheRealPro7 how is this possible Must animals also vaccinate? Put masks on em 🧠

Covid-19 infected lions prompt variant warning in SALions and pumas at a zoo in the South African capital of Pretoria got severe Covid-19 from asymptomatic zoo handlers, raising concerns that new variants could emerge from animal reservoirs of the disease, studies carried out by a local university showed. 🥱 massenya 😂 Our hard working scientists are at it again. Trying to out do everyone. Ban our travel tuu… why don’t you…🌚

Covid-19 infected lions prompt variant warning in SALions and pumas at a zoo in the SA capital of Pretoria got severe Covid19 from asymptomatic zoo handlers, raising concerns that new variants could emerge from animal reservoirs of the disease, studies carried out by a local university showed. Moneyweb Fearmongering 🤪 Ffs 🤦‍♂️

Covid-19 update: 3,658 new cases and 100 deaths reported in SAThe Omicron variant of Covid-19 is much more contagious than previous strains but seems to cause less serious disease.

SA records more than 3,600 new Covid-19 cases and 100 deaths in 24 hoursSA recorded 3,658 new Covid-19 cases in the past 24 hours, the NICD said on Tuesday.

SA records more than 3,600 new Covid-19 cases and 100 deaths in 24 hoursSA recorded 3,658 new Covid-19 cases in the past 24 hours, the NICD said on Tuesday. People don't believe in the Covid rules and that's why they get infected and die!!!!For once people,listen to doctors/scientists/ministers and our President!!!🙏🙏🙏

Wednesday 19 January 2022 - 7:25am Lion prides in South Africa must be carefully managed to avoid overpopulation and in-breeding. AFP/Wikus de Wet JOHANNESBURG - Big cats caged in zoos are at risk from catching COVID-19 from their keepers, a study said on Tuesday. Research led by scientists at the University of Pretoria found three lions and two pumas fell ill with coronavirus - and the clues point to infection by their handlers, some of whom were asymptomatic. "Reverse zoonotic (animal-borne) transmission of COVID-19... posed a risk to big cats kept in captivity," the authors said. The investigation was launched after three lions at an unnamed private zoo in Johannesburg fell ill last year with breathing difficulties, runny noses and a dry cough. One of the three developed pneumonia while the other two recovered after experiencing milder symptoms. As the signs were similar to coronavirus among humans, the animals were tested for COVID-19 and these came back positive. To establish the source of the infection, 12 zoo workers who had had direct and indirect contact with the animals were then tested, five of whom tested positive. "This data suggests that SARS-CoV-2 was circulating among staff during the time that the lions got sick, and suggests that those with direct contact with the animals were likely responsible for the reverse zoonotic transmission," said Marietjie Venter, a professor of virology at the university. Genome sequencing on viral samples taken from the humans and the animals found that the lions had become infected with the Delta variant of COVID-19, which was circulating in South Africa at the time. A year earlier, two pumas that had exhibited signs of anorexia, diarrhoea and nasal discharge also tested positive for COVID. They were treated and recovered after three weeks. A PCR test of the pumas' faeces at the time confirmed the presence of the COVID virus. When the scientists tried later to do genetic sequencing, there was insufficient viral material left to determine which variant was to blame. The assumption, however, is that the pumas also fell ill after being infected by humans. The research appears in a peer-reviewed, open-access journal called Viruses. Source