Lonmin, Marikana Massacre, Police Brutality, Marikana Commemoration, Opinion

Lonmin, Marikana Massacre

ANALYSIS: Disconnect between business & state contributed to Marikana massacre

ANALYSIS: Disconnect between business & state contributed to Marikana massacre

17.8.2019

ANALYSIS: Disconnect between business & state contributed to Marikana massacre

A lesson from the 2012 massacre of mineworkers is the need for government to retain its role as primary governance agent, enforcing clear rules and ensuring the provision of public goods and services.

Even a Lonmin executive conceded this link in one of the commission’s hearings.

Having collected data on mining companies in this area since 2001, I suspected that additional, processual factors were at play. So I studied how interactions between business and government created the underlying conditions that gave rise to the Marikana massacre.

I studied these interactions at the national level, especially in the debates surrounding the charter, as well as at the local level in the platinum mining area around Marikana.

The government and the mining companies also emphasised flexibility in the implementation of these ambiguous rules. As the government negotiator highlighted “you don’t want to straitjacket anybody, so there is flexibility in the implementation of the framework”.

The Mining Charter, as well as a broader international debate about corporate responsibility, expected companies to contribute to public goods and services in areas near their mines. The companies accepted this. In fact, mining companies sought to outdo each other in acting, and being seen, as public development agents.

Together, the ambiguity of the negotiated rules and the absence of the local state provided an excuse for Lonmin to renege on its housing commitment.

Secondly, government can’t retreat. Companies should insist that their contributions to public goods and services do not displace, but are in support of, government and other state organs as the primary governance agents.

Read more: Eyewitness News

Disconnect between business and state contributed to Marikana massacreI found that interactions between business and government progressively wore done the adopted and enacted social responsibilities of both parties

The Marikana Massacre: As it happened in 2012Much has been said and written about what has become known as the Marikana Massacre . But there were journalists on the ground when it all went down. This is how they reported on the Marikana Massacre in August 2012. Marikana NeverForget

The faces of Marikana: Part IFrom our archives| After years of struggling on the streets of Cape Town doing odd jobs, Mphumzeni Ngxande (38), finally got a break in 2008 when he packed his bags and went to work as a mine worker for Lonmin in North West. NeverForget Marikana

The faces of Marikana: Part IIHis first name was Stelega, a word Swazi language speakers use to describe a strike. NeverForget Marikana

The faces of Marikana: Part IIIKhanare Monesa (36) was looking forward to the birth of his first child. The birth of the child would also coincide with his first wedding anniversary. But these dreams were shattered by a bullet to the left side of his head. NeverForget Marikana

The faces of Marikana: Part IVIn the small Transkei village of Nquba, Mphangeli Thukuza (42) had a big reputation. He was a respected Pondo man with two wives and six children living in a beautiful village home. NeverForget Marikana

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