Art, Mobile Apps, Google, Smartify, Apple

Art, Mobile Apps

Wondering Who Did That Painting? There’s an App (or Two) for That

Apps are racing to create a Shazam for art, cataloging and classifying millions of images so our phones can recognize them in an instant.

12.9.2019

Apps are racing to create a Shazam for art, cataloging and classifying millions of images so our phones can recognize them in an instant.

With companies racing to develop Shazam for art, we see what instant-identification apps really add to your experience in museums and galleries.

, a platform oriented toward design objects, public and local art, furniture, and craft — enabling you to learn the name of that anonymous painting in your WeWork space or coffee shop . Image Ms. Cohen scanning works by Helen Frankenthaler at the Parrish Art Museum: at left, “Provincetown Window” (1963-64); top right, “Provincetown” (1964); and bottom right, “Summer Scene: Provincetown” (1961). Credit Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Vincent Tullo for The New York Times There are some barriers particular to creating a Shazam for art. Magnus Resch, founder of the Magnus app , laid out one: “There is a lot more art in the world than there are songs.” Cataloging individual artworks based in unique locations is far more difficult. Copyright law also poses challenges. The reproduction of artwork can be a violation of the owner’s copyright. Magnus contends that because the images are created and shared by users, the app is protected by the Digital Millennial Copyright Ac t. Galleries and competitors, Mr. Resch said, complained about the uploading of images and data to the app; in 2016, it was removed from the Apple Store for five months, but Apple ultimately reinstated Magnus after some disputed content was removed. Another issue is that image recognition technology still often lags when it comes to identifying 3D objects; even a well-known sculpture can baffle apps with its angles, resulting in the deflating, endless spin of technology that’s “thinking” ad infinitum. Then there is a more salient question for these platforms: What information can an app provide that will enhance the user’s experience of looking at art? What can a Shazam for art really add? Mr. Resch’s answer is simple: transparency. Galleries rarely post prices and often don’t provide basic wall text, so one often has to ask for the title or even the artist’s name. Jelena Cohen, a brand manager for Colgate-Palmolive, bought her first artwork, a photograph, at Frieze after using Magnus. Before trying the app, she said, the lack of information was a barrier. “I used to go to these art fairs, and I felt embarrassed or shy, because nothing’s listed,” Ms. Cohen said. “I loved that the app could scan a piece and give you the exact history of it, when it was last sold, and the price it was sold for. That helped me negotiate.” Magnus doesn’t give you an art history lesson, or even much of a basic summary about a work; like Shazam, it’s a little blip of information in the dark. Smartify, on the other hand, wants to app-ify what was once the purview of an audio guide. Hold it up to a Gustave Caillebotte still life, as I did, and the app provides information that’s already available on the wall, including the chance to click-to-learn-more. Part of the app’s mission is ease of use and accessibility. People with visual impairments can use Smartify with their phones’ native audio settings and the app is working to integrate audio. The app is elegant and straightforward, and the source is generally cited and fact-checked. Image Information about a painting that Ms. Cohen saved on the Magnus app shows the price of the artwork and its buying history. Credit Vincent Tullo for The New York Times Image Magnus has built a database of more than 10 million images of art. Ms. Cohen uses the app on other Frankenthaler works at the Parrish, at left, “Beach Scene” (1961), and right, “Square Figure” (1961). Credit Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Vincent Tullo for The New York Times Smartify’s major limitation is that because the app teams up directly with museums, it only works well in a few places. London’s National Gallery, where I tested it, was one of them; it didn’t miss a single painting in the permanent collection. But at the Met, where Smartify has uploaded a limited set of images, I spent a frustrating afternoon waving the app at paintings as it failed to return even facts that I could read in the wall texts. It’s telling, perhaps, that even as these apps build out their databases, some museums themselves are starting to shy away from apps altogether. The Metropolitan Museum, which rolled out its own app with fanfare in 2014, shuttered it last year. “While the app was doing a lot of things well, we wanted to create something more seamless,” said Sofie Andersen, the interim chief digital officer at the Met. This translates into content that loads directly in your phone browser as a website, no download required. Similarly, the Jewish Museum introduced a new set of audio tours in July , all on a web-based interface. “A few years ago, there was an app craze, and now everyone’s entering this post-app phase in the museum industry,” said JiaJia Fei , director of digital for the Jewish Museum. She noted that the vast majority of apps that people download sit unused on their phones. “You just end up using your email and Instagram.” After a few weeks of trying out apps-for-art in museums and galleries, on street corners and in the occasional coffee shop, I found that they did not increase the quality of my visual encounters. Although the caliber of information in Smartify is quite high when it works — I was able to learn more about specific figures in J.M.W. Turner’s “Ulysses Deriding Polyphemus” — the simple act of raising my phone to take a picture transformed a vibrant physical painting into a flattened reproduction. The extra information wasn’t worth mediating my museum experience through a screen. And phones are already everywhere in museums, transforming a visit into cataloging as we go. Ms. Fei referred to this as “screen suck,” and it’s one reason audio is the preferred medium for the Jewish Museum. Like Shazam itself, the apps are best used for quick answers — a lifeline in a contextless gallery. What is that? How much does it cost? Who made it? (Here, Magnus is the leader.) The Shazamification of art is a product of a time in which information overpowers the naked eye. But the app shouldn’t be our sole guide through the visual world. Walking around the New Museum with the Magnus app, I found myself breezing past paintings, not looking too hard at details because the camera was looking for me, and the app knew much more than I did. There was that little addictive, satisfying click of recognition. It was hard to stop. Read more: The New York Times

They could try reading the sign next to the painting. Now HOW can WE THE PPL as LOGICAL thinking folk EVEN to begin to SHAKE our HEADS Alyssa_Milano telling tedcruz SenTedCruz she OWNS 2 guns for safety but YET SHE IS ADAMANT that school teachers don’t need to carry / it’s OK for her to PROTECT but doesn’t THINK ANY1 else should

Donald is super duper happy that he will finally get the credit he deserves for his works of art

Someone dies by suicide every 40 seconds, WHO reportsHere's what WHO suggests that we do to help take care of each other, in honor of WorldSuicidePreventionDay

I Didn't Feel Like a Fully Functioning, Card-Carrying Adult Until I Got My CatsThere's something about being responsible for two other lives that made me feel like a true grown-up.

Salvadoran activists hurl confetti, paint to protest new abortion trialActivists in El Salvador threw eggs filled with confetti and sprayed red paint o... The blood of babies. For shame

A Non-Racist Conservatism Must Look to the Future, Not the PastA non-racist conservatism must look to the future, not the past. zakcheneyrice writes zakcheneyrice Birthism and an anti-immigrant stance propelled Trump into the WH. Without racism the GOP withers and dies. zakcheneyrice ‘Non-racist conservatism’ When they teach kids in school what an oxymoron is, people should use that phrase to illustrate zakcheneyrice Think you'll find that 'non-racist' and 'conservatism' are antonyms in real life. Also, conservatism is literally based on the commitment to 'traditional' values and ideas, and the opposition to change and innovation... Your headline is quite the clusterfuck of oxymorons. 😬

How Unsanitary Is It to Kiss Your Pet on the Mouth?Nope. Definitely haven't done this before. Has never crossed my mind. Hard pass. (*clicks* 👀👀👀👀👀)

If You Think Taylor Swift Is the Only Artist Making Protest Songs, You’re Just Not ListeningBlack artists are likely wondering what took Swift so long. ...who is thinking that lol Literally no one on earth is thinking that...we are just proud she is among others now aaminasdfghjkl artist? protest songs?



‘Tell Me About It, Stud,’ Says Pleather-Clad Elizabeth Warren On Debate Stage In Effort To Court Bad Boy Demographic

Boras to honor Kobe's wish, grant internship

Moderators Kick Off Debate By Asking Whether Bloomberg Ready To Get Shit Rocked Again

Elena Kagan Worried She’s A Fraud After Being Only Female Justice Not Called Out By Trump

Democratic candidates facing off on stage in South Carolina: Live updates

Democratic Debate Live Updates: Candidates Clash

Michael Hertz — You’ve Surely Seen His Subway Map — Dies at 87

Write Comment

Thank you for your comment.
Please try again later.

Latest News

News

12 September 2019, Thursday News

Previous news

In Texas, mobile units treat children, teens affected by Hurricane Harvey

Next news

Former kids from schools near Ground Zero battle health issues with unknown outcomes
BTS 'Carpool Karaoke' just dropped and it's every bit as glorious as we'd hoped Elizabeth Warren Challenges Michael Bloomberg on ‘Kill It’ Abortion Comment Distracted driver in fatal 2018 Tesla crash was playing video game: NTSB Judge rips Trump tweets on 'tainted' juror while Stone's lawyers admit they never Googled her Global Stocks Extend Losses as Virus Fears Deepen Brazilian transgender dancer shatters Carnival parade taboo 7-year-old girl dies during tonsillectomy Flight attendant diagnosed with coronavirus might have serviced trips between Seoul and Los Angeles Transgender athlete opens up about overcoming insecurities through bodybuilding Second Cruise Ship Blocked From Ports Over Coronavirus Fears Patrick Stewart Explains How He and Ian McKellen Became Inseparable Warren Buffett finally traded in his flip phone for an iPhone
‘Tell Me About It, Stud,’ Says Pleather-Clad Elizabeth Warren On Debate Stage In Effort To Court Bad Boy Demographic Boras to honor Kobe's wish, grant internship Moderators Kick Off Debate By Asking Whether Bloomberg Ready To Get Shit Rocked Again Elena Kagan Worried She’s A Fraud After Being Only Female Justice Not Called Out By Trump Democratic candidates facing off on stage in South Carolina: Live updates Democratic Debate Live Updates: Candidates Clash Michael Hertz — You’ve Surely Seen His Subway Map — Dies at 87 Video shows police arresting 6-year-old girl at school Amid Insults and Interruptions, Sanders Absorbs Burst of Attacks in Debate Over 1,300 complaints were sent to the FCC about Shakira and J.Lo's Super Bowl halftime show Warren hits Bloomberg over alleged abortion comment to employee Democratic Debate: Mike Bloomberg Slams Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren Hammers Both