Why is the once-acclaimed ‘other Iraq’ struck by exodus?

“Without absolute sovereignty in its territories, alongside ongoing conflicts and threats, the KRI seems safer than the rest of chaotic Iraq but is still not a safe place” Opinion | @bekir_aydgn

Iraq, Krg

12/7/2021 12:20:00 PM

“Without absolute sovereignty in its territories, alongside ongoing conflicts and threats, the KRI seems safer than the rest of chaotic Iraq but is still not a safe place” Opinion | bekir_aydgn

While the Kurdish region of Iraq is known to be relatively stable and prosperous compared to the rest of the country, economic and political woes are pushing Kurds to take the perilous journey to Europe in large numbers.

Dual administration and political discontentHaving said that, many observers point out that the corruption, nepotism, and patronage network that stem from the political duopoly is among the adverse factors spreading discontent, particularly among the youth. 

The KRI has been dominated by the two ruling parties since 1991: the Barzani family-led KDP based in Erbil, and the Talabani family-led PUK based in Sulaymaniyah. Both parties control separate Peshmerga forces, intelligence services, and financial resources under their zones of influence, while the ruling elites and party networks enjoy economic and political privileges. This deep-seated

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people on the government payroll. In addition to years-long uncertainty in salaries that still worries many, unemployment issues and overall low income also compel many to work multiple jobs to make ends meet. Dual administration and political discontent Having said that, many observers point out that the corruption, nepotism, and patronage network that stem from the political duopoly is among the adverse factors spreading discontent, particularly among the youth.  The KRI has been dominated by the two ruling parties since 1991: the Barzani family-led KDP based in Erbil, and the Talabani family-led PUK based in Sulaymaniyah. Both parties control separate Peshmerga forces, intelligence services, and financial resources under their zones of influence, while the ruling elites and party networks enjoy economic and political privileges. This deep-seated  dual administration itself has long been criticised by opposition parties and the educated newer generations. As a matter of fact, the existing protest culture in KRI is indicative of economic and political dissatisfactions. It is common to witness several demonstrations rooted in economic grievances easily turning into anti-government  protests that spread throughout the region, and usually end up in violence.  During last year’s protests, KRI authorities were accused of “arbitrary arrests and [the] enforced disappearance of activists and journalists” by