UT Southwestern researchers confirm two BA.2 cases in North Texas

1/28/2022 4:37:00 PM

UT Southwestern researchers confirm two BA.2 cases in North Texas

UT Southwestern researchers confirm two BA.2 cases in North Texas

Researchers confirmed two cases of BA.2, a sub-lineage of the omicron variant, through sequencing at the University of Texas Southwestern on Thursday....

Researchers confirmed two cases of BA.2, a sub-lineage of the omicron variant, through sequencing at the University of Texas Southwestern on Thursday.In Denmark, BA.2 jumped from 20% of COVID-19 cases in the last week of December to 45% of cases in the second week of January, according to Danish public health organization Statens Serum Institut.

“In the U.S., we have to wait and see what the story is on BA.2 and how it compares to BA.1,” he said. “It’s worth keeping an eye on right now.”BA.1 and BA.2 have a handful of differences in their genomes, including in the spike protein, which impacts how easily the strains can be differentiated, said Dr. Jeffrey SoRelle, who is leading the University of Texas Southwestern’s COVID-19 variant tracking effort.

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'Stealth' BA.2 Omicron Variant Arrives In North TexasNEW - UT Southwestern has confirmed the arrival of the BA.2 Omicron variant in North Texas through its genomic sequencing laboratory. Rinse. Repeat. Yaaaayyy

What to know about BA.2, the newest Covid omicron variantAs coronavirus case numbers in the U.S. show early signs of tapering, scientists are keeping a watchful eye on a newly identified version of the omicron They’re making up sht now flurona was the latest lie Sounds scary enough.

What to know about BA.2, new omicron subvariant detected in several US statesBA.2 numbers around the world are rising, with at least 40 countries reporting cases. Col experts are saying it's no worse than omicron on to the next variant, please

What we know about the Omicron sub-variant BA.2Experts caution against sounding the alarm bell and say there is no evidence that BA.2 is deadlier, while there are indications that it could be more transmissible than the original Omicron variant.

Scientists keep an eye on 'stealth' Omicron variant BA.2This version of the coronavirus, which scientists call BA.2, has been found in at least 40 countries, including the U.S. Don't be a Covidiot Stealthy huh. Getting creative with the scary names. Be afraid! Be very afraid! Of everything! All the time! Or just live your life and stop being controlled by the fearmongers.

Omicron sub-variant discovered in U.S.: What is known so far about BA.2A new sub-variant of the omicron variant of COVID-19, known as BA.2, has been discovered in the U.S. and several other countries. Here we go......again‼️🙄 😂😂😂 THIS IS WHAT VIRUSES DO!!! Baaa.. appropriate...

6:00 AM on Jan 25, 2022 CST — Updated at 5:09 PM on Jan 27, 2022 CST Update: This story has been updated to include the confirmation of BA.At least two people have it, according to a spokesperson for the hospital.Is it more contagious? Preliminary research in Denmark, where cases involving BA.More News Videos Scientists warn that omicron's whirlwind spread across the globe practically ensures it won't be the last worrisome coronavirus variant.

2 cases in North Texas. Researchers confirmed two cases of BA.5M Donation, Largest In Its History The CDC said it is watching this new development closely, adding that while it is increased in other countries, it is not that common in the U.2, a sub-lineage of the omicron variant, through sequencing at the University of Texas Southwestern on Thursday.2 subtype accounted for 20 percent of Denmark's Covid-19 cases at the end of December, and it jumped to 45 percent of reported cases by the second week of January. Scientists discovered the sub-lineage in December, shortly after the original omicron lineage, called BA. Currently there isn’t enough data to predict how this new version will affect cases.1, was identified.1, but data is limited.

Recent spread of the sub-lineage led the U. Since mid-November, more than three dozen countries have uploaded nearly 15,000 genetic sequences of BA. That type of rapid growth could indicate that BA.K. Health Security Agency to designate BA. As of Tuesday morning, 96 of those sequenced cases came from the U.2 as “under investigation.2 cases rising across the country, including in regions where the original omicron strain was dominant.” Public health experts are monitoring the strain as it spreads in several European and Asian countries. “Thus far, we haven’t seen it start to gain ground” in the U. Although it's been called the"stealth" omicron variant, the new subvariant,"can absolutely be detected through traditional surveillance mechanisms whether through rapid testing or PCR," said Dr.

BA.2 is believed to be more transmissible than BA., Dr. "That suggests that maybe BA.1, but not much else is known about the variant. In Denmark, BA.2 jumped from 20% of COVID-19 cases in the last week of December to 45% of cases in the second week of January, according to Danish public health organization Statens Serum Institut. But Ray said much remains unknown about the situation in Denmark and whether BA. The new BA.

Fewer than 100 cases of BA.2 have been reported in the U.S. Does it cause more severe illness? So far, there is no evidence to suggest that the subvariant causes more severe illness or symptoms, but it may be too soon to tell., a mere fraction of the more than 660,000 omicron cases detected in the country in the last week, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. . Ultimately, while scientists and public health officials are urging continued research and surveillance, experts say there is little reason to worry.

While BA. Still, hospitalizations and deaths from Covid-19 tend to lag behind infections.2 has the potential to take over omicron as the dominant variant in the U.S., it’s too early to tell what impact the sub-lineage will have on the pandemic, said Dr." Are vaccines effective against the subvariant? More research is needed, but early reports show that vaccines are roughly as effective against BA. Wesley Long, medical director of diagnostic microbiology at Houston Methodist. Nitya Rajeshuni, M.

“In the U.S. And while the omicron variant caused less severe disease overall, the sheer number of infections during this wave is still placing a huge burden on hospitals across the country., we have to wait and see what the story is on BA.2 and how it compares to BA.1,” he said.2 subvariant. The video in the media player above was used in a previous report.

“It’s worth keeping an eye on right now.” Here’s what experts know so far about the sub-lineage – and what they know about other future COVID-19 variants. How does BA. He said it remains as important as ever to continue promoting vaccination efforts and to keep wearing masks to protect vulnerable people in the community.2 differ from omicron’s original lineage? BA.1 and BA.

2 have a handful of differences in their genomes, including in the spike protein, which impacts how easily the strains can be differentiated, said Dr. In the U. Jeffrey SoRelle, who is leading the University of Texas Southwestern’s COVID-19 variant tracking effort. One of the early systems for differentiating omicron from previous variants is a PCR test that looks for three different genomic targets, he said. BA.2 accounts for an extremely low percentage of newly reported cases, but it has already been detected in California, Washington, New York, Texas, Utah, New Mexico and other states.1 has a mutation at the site of one of the targets, causing that specific target to fail.

BA.2 does not have that mutation, so it can’t be differentiated from delta in the same way. BA.2′s ability to avoid differentiation through that early testing system secured the sub-lineage the nickname of the “stealth” omicron variant. The nickname, however, is a bit of a misnomer, SoRelle said.

“Our sequencing can still detect it, our diagnostic testing can still detect it, antigen tests should still be able to detect it,” he said. Should we be worried about BA.2? Early data out of Denmark shows that BA.2 appears to be more transmissible than BA.1, SoRelle said.

It’s possible that BA.2 will take over as the dominant strain everywhere, just as BA.1 did with the delta variant, although scientists won’t know for some time. There’s no current evidence to suggest that BA.2 causes more severe illness than BA.

1, Long said. Experts are watching to see whether BA.2 is any better at evading the COVID-19 vaccine than its fellow omicron sub-lineage. Because BA.1 and BA.

2 are somewhat closely related, it’s possible that people recently infected with omicron will be less likely to become infected with BA.2 in the near future, said Jeremy Kamil, associate professor of microbiology and immunology at Louisiana State University Health Shreveport. “We know that a lot of people’s natural defense against delta wasn’t sufficient to stop them from being infected by omicron,” he said. But, “I’m quite skeptical that someone who’s recovered from BA.1 is going to be a good host for BA.

2. I sincerely doubt it.” While BA.2 is worth monitoring, experts say it’s not a major point of concern right now. “I don’t think it’s worth being worried about BA.

2, in particular, more than one would already be concerned about omicron BA.1. I think it’s something we need to keep an eye on,” Long said. What other variants can we expect to develop after omicron? Experts say it’s very possible that another coronavirus variant will develop after omicron cases die down, especially because of how transmissible omicron is. The more a virus is transmitted, the more opportunities it has to mutate and give rise to a new strain.

“As long as COVID is transmitted, especially in areas where there are low vaccination rates, we are at risk of having a new variant emerge that, through immune evasion or an increase in transmissibility, could start another wave [of COVID-19],” Long said. What that potential new variant will look like is less clear. “Every single variant has been very different in characteristics, so it’s hard to extrapolate too much into the future, SoRelle said. “Even though [omicron] was less severe, it was much more transmissible and it put more people in the hospital at one time than did the delta strain, for instance.” Even if their emergence is possible, new variants are not necessarily inevitable.

So far, variants have developed in countries with low vaccination rates, so focusing on increasing overall vaccination rates could lower the risk of new variants developing, SoRelle said. .