Covid-19 Vaccines, Qari Asim, Imams Across Britain, Uk Muslim Communities, Mosques And Imams National Advisory Board, Pakistani Or Bangladeshi, Uk Ethnic Minorities, Minab, Imam Nuru Mohammed

Covid-19 Vaccines, Qari Asim

UK imams mobilise to counter Covid-19 vaccine disinformation

UK imams are confident that the two vaccines that are being used in the UK, Oxford AstraZeneca and Pfizer, are permissible from an Islamic perspective.

1/27/2021 12:15:00 PM

Imams across Britain help dispel coronavirus disinformation by using Friday sermons and their influence to assure Muslim communities about the safety of Covid-19 vaccines

UK imams are confident that the two vaccines that are being used in the UK, Oxford AstraZeneca and Pfizer, are permissible from an Islamic perspective.

Imams across Britain are helping a drive to dispel coronavirus disinformation, using Friday sermons and their influential standing within Muslim communities to argue that Covid-19 vaccines are safe.Qari Asim, chairman of the Mosques and Imams National Advisory Board, which is leading a campaign to reassure its faithful, is among those publically advocating that the inoculations are compatible with Islamic practices.

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"We are confident that the two vaccines that have been used in the UK, Oxford AstraZeneca and Pfizer, are permissible from an Islamic perspective," he told AFP."The hesitancy, the anxiety (and) concern is driven by misinformation, conspiracy theories, fake news and rumours."

Britain, the hardest-hit country in Europe by the virus after registering nearly 95,000 deaths, is relying on its biggest-ever vaccination effort to end repeated cycles of lockdowns and restrictions.READ MORE:UK surpasses 100,000 Covid deaths in grim new milestone – latest updates headtopics.com

However, a report from the scientific committee advising the government showed stronger mistrust of vaccines among ethnic minorities than the rest of the UK population.It highlighted that 72 percent of Black survey respondents were unlikely or very unlikely to get the vaccine.

Among those from Pakistani or Bangladeshi backgrounds, the figure was 42 percent.Imams are pushing back in particular at fears among Britain's estimated 2.8 million Muslims that the vaccines contain pork gelatin or alcohol, which are banned by Islam.

Asim said it was "legitimate" to question whether things were permissible under Islam but without paying attention to unfounded claims.Among the falsehoods spread about the vaccine are that it can modify DNA, make recipients sterile, or even involve inserting a microchip in the body.

Read more: TRT World »

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