Salad, Fruit, Vegetable, Fall, Winter, One-Pot Wonders, Make Ahead, Vegetarian, Vegan

Salad, Fruit

Turmeric-Roasted Cauliflower with Pistachio Gremolata Recipe on Food52

'The dish comes together quickly and easily—and even better, I can get all of the ingredients at my neighborhood supermarket.'

8/6/2020 6:35:00 AM

'The dish comes together quickly and easily—and even better, I can get all of the ingredients at my neighborhood supermarket.'

I used to hunt for two kinds of recipes: everyday food for my husband and me, and “company-worthy” dishes for entertaining. The two sets of recipes hardly ever overlapped—neither in the big file box with precisely labeled folders that I crammed full of newspaper clippings and torn-out pages from Gourmet, nor in the way I served them. We were newly married, learning how to cook and host together in our small apartment. I’d spend hours coming up with ambitious, multi-course menus that started with hors d'oeuvres and a soup or plated salad. We’d go to multiple grocery stores and specialty markets to hunt down ingredients, if that's what it took, and would start prepping days in advance. I made everything I could from scratch. We enjoyed those dinner parties, but without fail, we’d collapse from exhaustion after our guests left, leaving a mountain of dirty dishes for the next day. Fast forward sixteen years: My husband and I still love to host, but I couldn’t tell you the last time I served a plated salad. We serve everything family-or buffet-style and usually do our shopping the morning of—the day before, if we’ve really planned ahead. Sure, having two kids and less free time changes the equation, but we’ve intentionally and openly embraced a simpler, more casual style of hosting. Our dressed-down dinner parties are a whole lot easier to pull off, and more fun, too. And when it comes to the menu planning? I turn to recipes that we like to make for ourselves—ones that can go from weeknight to weekend dinner party, and vice versa. I’ve discarded the notion that certain types of food are only worthy for company, and not for yourself or your family, any night of the week. Or that dinner party food needs to be fancy or complicated to be special. I prize low-effort, high-impact dishes, and once I find them, I make them every chance I get, no matter the occasion. This is why I’m so taken with this Turmeric-Roasted Cauliflower with Pistachio Gremolata. I came up with the r

Author NotesI used to hunt for two kinds of recipes: everyday food for my husband and me, and “company-worthy” dishes for entertaining. The two sets of recipes hardly ever overlapped—neither in the big file box with precisely labeled folders that I crammed full of newspaper clippings and torn-out pages from

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Gourmet, nor in the way I served them.We were newly married, learning how to cook and host together in our small apartment. I’d spend hours coming up with ambitious, multi-course menus that started with hors d'oeuvres and a soup or plated salad. We’d go to multiple grocery stores and specialty markets to hunt down ingredients, if that's what it took, and would start prepping days in advance. I made everything I could from scratch. We enjoyed those dinner parties, but without fail, we’d collapse from exhaustion after our guests left, leaving a mountain of dirty dishes for the next day.

Fast forward sixteen years: My husband and I still love to host, but I couldn’t tell you the last time I served a plated salad. We serve everything family-or buffet-style and usually do our shopping the morning of—the day before, if we’vereallyplanned ahead. Sure, having two kids and less free time changes the equation, but we’ve intentionally and openly embraced a simpler, more casual style of hosting. Our dressed-down dinner parties are a whole lot easier to pull off, and more fun, too.

And when it comes to the menu planning? I turn to recipes that we like to make for ourselves—ones that can go from weeknight to weekend dinner party, and vice versa. I’ve discarded the notion that certain types of food are only worthy for company, and not for yourself or your family, any night of the week. Or that dinner party food needs to be fancy or complicated to be special. I prize low-effort, high-impact dishes, and once I find them, I make them every chance I get, no matter the occasion.

This is why I’m so taken with this Turmeric-Roasted Cauliflower with Pistachio Gremolata. I came up with the recipe as a simple way to dress up roasted cauliflower, something I make often this time of year. I love how the freshly grated bits of turmeric (ground turmeric is a fine substitute if you can't find fresh) get deliciously caramelized on the hot sheet pan, and how its earthiness complements the mild sweetness of cauliflower.

And, because I’m a sucker for nutty, herby condiments, the whole thing is topped with pistachio gremolata (lots of it), plus juicy pomegranate arils to add extra freshness and zing (I like to use them liberally to make the dish a little salad-like). When pomegranates aren't in season, either omit the arils (no substitutions needed) or omit the dates and use currants or dried cranberries in place of the arils.

The dish comes together quickly and easily—and even better, I can get all of the ingredients at my neighborhood supermarket. It’s so striking in flavor and presentation, and a dish that’s equally special for busy weeknights and relaxed weekend dinner parties.

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During the week, I serve it as a main course, maybe with some leftover chicken on the side. On the weekends, I serve it as a side dish to go along with whatever meat or fish we’re roasting or grilling—whether for my family, or a table of friends. It’s the type of dish that I’ll never tire of, no matter how many times I serve it.

Read more: Food52 »

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foods_HQ Looks really good! Love the dates and pistachios in this recipe! 😁

L’Artusi’s Famous Mushroom Ragu With Fresh Garganelli Recipe on Food52My boyfriend and I are long-distance, so we get to see each other about once every three months. When we are together, we like to cook, explore whichever city we’re in (usually Berkeley or New York City, where we each live respectively), and spend a healthy amount of time vegging out on the couch watching Netflix (Chef’s Table, Parks & Rec, you know, the modern classics). While we try not to schedule out our time too strictly, there’s one tradition we’ve yet to break: date night. We take this quarterly date night very seriously, and spend weeks picking out a restaurant with the right balance of menu options (he's a vegetarian, so there’s got to be at least a few different choices for him), ambience (romantic, not stuffy), and budget (sometimes we splurge, sometimes we keep it low-key). For some reason, we always gravitate towards Italian food, and that helps narrow down our choices. Past winners have included Acquerello in San Francisco (a very worth-it splurge) and Lilia in Brooklyn (excellent and wonderfully priced), but there’s one dish I haven’t been able to stop thinking about since one date night from about a year ago: the mushroom ragu with garganelli at L’Artusi in New York City’s West Village. Tubular little bites of fresh garganelli pasta wrapped in a creamy, luxurious sauce of nothing-but-mushroom flavor. At the same time, it was meaty and hearty, filling enough to make me ignore the buttery cacio e pepe sitting across the table—and my boyfriend. The cherry on top of the ragu: a generous layer of shaved ricotta salata, a dried, salted ricotta cheese. It was love at first bite. I immediately wanted to know the secrets behind its silky texture, mushroomy goodness, and—whoa—completely vegetarian ingredients list. Surely, there must be some complicated technique or sneaky component hiding within the recipe. After 379 or so odd days (but who’s counting?) after tasting, and subsequently dreaming, about this ragu, I finally tracked down L’Artusi’s executive

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