The Arctic is heating up nearly 4 times faster than the whole planet, study finds

8/11/2022 8:30:00 PM

The Arctic is very sensitive to climate change. In the last 40 years, the region has warmed much more rapidly than the Earth as a whole, a new study finds.

Scientists previously estimated that the Arctic is heating up about twice as fast as the globe overall, but a new study finds that's a significant underestimate. Loss of sea ice is one of the clearest drivers behind the rapid warming.

The Arctic is very sensitive to climate change. In the last 40 years, the region has warmed much more rapidly than the Earth as a whole, a new study finds.

August 11, 2022 Rebecca Hersher, NPR News Share: Temperatures in Longyearbyen, Norway above the Arctic Circle hit a new record above 70 degrees Fahrenheit in July 2020.seasonal changes shift the tundra landscape from being a temporary carbon sink to being a temporary carbon source.Share on Pinterest Share on LinkedIn FAIRBANKS, Alaska (KTVF) - A hallway at the International Arctic Research Center carries a new striped design showcasing the arctic’s climate year-by-year since 1900 - a window into the region’s past.UK government survey found that more than half the people in the country want to make more sustainable choices around food.

The Arctic has warmed nearly four times faster than the planet as a whole since 1979, a new study finds.(Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images) The Arctic is heating up nearly four times faster than the Earth as a whole, according to new research.Carbon dioxide levels measured at NOAA’s four observatories have risen steadily since the 1970s.The findings are a reminder that the people, plants and animals in polar regions are experiencing rapid, and disastrous, climate change.“We take the average temperature for each year, and then rank them,” Thoman continued, “so that the coldest year gets the deepest blue, the warmest year gets the deepest red, and so we just have a continuous gradation between that.Scientists previously estimated that the Arctic is heating up about twice as fast as the globe overall.(Graph provided by NOAA) Even on that early August day with sunny skies and green plants on the tundra still photosynthesizing and thus absorbing carbon from the air, the atmospheric CO2 levels at this Arctic location measured 402.The new study finds that is a significant underestimate of recent warming.The researchers then gave food items an environmental-impact score out of 100 — with 100 being the worst — by combining the impacts of the ingredients in 100 grams of each product.

In the last 43 years, the region has warmed 3.“We’re over 400 and it’s not going back,” said Bryan Thomas, the station chief at the observatory.“There’s some year to year variability, but the pattern as you walk along here is very very clear,” Thoman said.8 times faster than the planet as a whole, the authors find.The study focuses on the period between 1979, when reliable satellite measurements of global temperatures began, and 2021.Readings well above 400 have now become routine.“The Arctic is more sensitive to global warming than previously thought,” says Mika Rantanen of the Finnish Meteorological Institute, who is one of the authors of the study published in the journal Communications Earth & Environment.” According to Thoman, the area being measured encompasses the whole arctic region, “which, for this purpose, we defined as 60° latitude and northward for the entire arctic.There have been hints in recent years that the Arctic is heating up even more quickly than computer models predicted.We could have done more sooner.There were some notable exceptions: both nuts and seafood had a good nutrition score but relatively high environmental impacts.

Heat waves in the far North have driven wildfires and jaw-dropping ice melt in the circumpolar region that includes Alaska, Arctic Canada, Greenland, Scandinavia and Siberia.“This will probably be a bit of a surprise, but also kind of extra motivation perhaps,” says Richard Davy, a climate scientist at Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center in Norway, who was not involved in the new study.The Barrow Atmospheric Baseline Observatory is one of four such NOAA remote baseline observatories that measure the global atmosphere from the Arctic to the Antarctic.The process of reconstructing past temperatures carries with it some uncertainty.“Things are moving faster than we could have expected from the model projections.” There are many reasons why the Arctic is heating up more quickly than other parts of the Earth.Last year, the global average for atmospheric carbon as measured by all four observatories set a record for the annual average, 414 parts per million.Changes in the amount of air pollution coming from Europe and natural multi-decade climate variations likely play a role.However, when the whole arctic is considered, the climate patterns being seen become more stable from measurement to measurement, removing much of that uncertainty, according to Thoman.org/10.

But human-caused global warming is the underlying reason that the Arctic, and the planet as a whole, are heating up.“It keeps going up,” said Brian Vasel, director of operations at NOAA’s Global Monitoring Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, who was in Utqiagvik for the opening celebration.Loss of sea ice is one of the clearest drivers of Arctic warming.The Arctic Circle is mostly ocean, which used to be frozen for most or all of the year.57 parts per million measured on Aug.That’s a result of early snowmelt and then a warm and dry spring,” Thoman said.But permanent sea ice is steadily shrinking , and seasonal ice is melting earlier in the year and re-forming later.That means more open water.(Photo by Yereth Rosen/Alaska Beacon) Gases, particulates, solar reflection and permafrost are monitored Much more than carbon dioxide gets monitored at the Barrow observatory and at its three sister observatories.

But while ice is bright and reflects heat from the sun, water is darker and absorbs it.All rights reserved.That heat helps melt more ice, which means more water to trap more heat – the loop feeds on itself, accelerating warming in the Arctic.For the Barrow observatory, an important task is measuring particulates in the air, like black carbon and similar brown carbon, varieties of soot that darken snow and ice and reduce their ability to reflect solar heat.“That’s why the temperature trends are the highest [in] those areas where the sea ice has declined most,” explains Rantanen.There are hotspots in the Bering Sea over Northern Europe and Siberia, which are heating up about seven times faster than the global average, the study estimates.From the rooftop, NOAA technicians measure the degree to which the white landscape reflects the sun rather than absorbs it, a phenomenon called albedo.Rapid Arctic warming affects people living far from the Arctic circle.

For example, there is evidence that weather patterns are shifting across the U.And air sampling is enhanced by a new sensor-equipped tower outside the building that is 100 feet high, replacing the old 60-foot tower.S.and Europe as sea ice melts, and many marine species migrate between the tropics and the Arctic each year.A treaty signed in 1987, the Montreal Protocol, phased out and ultimately banned the ozone-depleting chemicals, and readings at the Barrow observatory and elsewhere tracked their decrease in the following years.“What happens in the Arctic doesn’t just stay in the Arctic,” says Davy.The new research also finds that the advanced computer models that scientists use to understand how the global climate is changing now, and will change in the future, struggle to capture the relative speed of Arctic warming.The Alaska site caught a disturbing trend that started in about 2013.

That suggests that future models may need to be adjusted to better capture the realities of global warming in polar regions, although this study did not tease apart what exactly is missing from current models.“The paper’s finding that climate models tend to underestimate the warming ratio [between the Arctic and the Earth as a whole] is really interesting,” says Kyle Armour, a climate scientist at the University of Washington who was not involved in the new study.That pointed to loopholes or outright violations of the Montreal Protocol.Previous studies have found that computer models actually do a good job estimating how much the Arctic has heated up, but that they tend to overestimate how much hotter the whole planet is, Armour explains.That means the models’ comparison between Arctic warming and overall warming ends up being incorrect.Behind Vasel, at the Barrow site on Aug.“We have more work to do to figure out the source of this model bias,” says Armour.

And that work is increasingly important, because world leaders use climate models to understand what the future holds and how to avoid even more catastrophic warming.S.Copyright 2022 NPR.To see more, visit https://www.(Photo by Yereth Rosen/Alaska Beacon) The Barrow observatory was the first of the four to record the flattening trend that was later picked up worldwide.npr.org.Corrective actions followed, and by 2018 CFC levels were back on their expected rate of decline.

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On Utqiagvik’s edge, an observatory measures the gases that are warming the Arctic and the planetThe observatory's location is deliberate. It's far from any significant development, and prevailing winds over the ocean make the air some of the purest on Earth. Its Arctic location is critical, as the Arctic is warming at four times the global rate.

Wall design at Troth Yeddha campus visualizes warming arctic climateA hallway at the International Arctic Research Center carries a new striped design showcasing the arctic’s climate year-by-year since 1900, a window into the region’s past.

Healthier foods are better for the planet, mammoth study findsAnalysis of 57,000 multi-ingredient foods reveals which have the best and worst environmental impacts. No $hit Can someone explain the lowest impact bar( below 1) . How are fried onion rings and potato better than vegetables? How do energy drinks have a low environmental impact? It’s bottled water fps! Wonder where whisky falls on that chart. Need some after reading that crap.

On Utqiagvik’s edge, an observatory measures the gases that are warming the Arctic and the planetThe observatory's location is deliberate. It's far from any significant development, and prevailing winds over the ocean make the air some of the purest on Earth. Its Arctic location is critical, as the Arctic is warming at four times the global rate.

Landfills around the world release a lot of methane - studyDecomposing food waste is releasing thousands of tonnes of planet-warming methane gas at landfills in Buenos Aires, Delhi, Mumbai, and Lahore, new research finds. Capture the gas and make power from it. Not too much food waste; rather, too many humans. overpopulation its like the solution to this whole climate change and polution thing is to revert back to the late 1800s, horse and buggy,

Wall design at Troth Yeddha campus visualizes warming arctic climateA hallway at the International Arctic Research Center carries a new striped design showcasing the arctic’s climate year-by-year since 1900, a window into the region’s past.