Prepare For Outbreaks Like New York's In Other States, Warns Anthony Fauci

A key adviser to the president, Dr. Anthony Fauci doesn't think every state needs to be on lockdown just yet. But some places should be preparing for surges like New York's.

3/26/2020

More than 1,000 people have died in the U.S. from COVID-19 — and over a third of those deaths were in New York. Dr. Anthony Fauci says other states need to start preparing now to take on outbreaks of this scale.

A key adviser to the president, Dr. Anthony Fauci doesn't think every state needs to be on lockdown just yet. But some places should be preparing for surges like New York's.

Embed< iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/821925490/822017724" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, listens during a news conference at the White House, Wednesday, March 25, 2020. Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, listens during a news conference at the White House, Wednesday, March 25, 2020. Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images Over a thousand people in the U.S. have died from COVID-19, and over a third of those deaths have taken place in New York. Nearly half the confirmed cases in the United States are in New York. The state has become a coronavirus hotspot — anyone leaving New York City is being asked to self-quarantine for two weeks. A key adviser to President Trump, Dr. Anthony Fauci , director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and member of the White House Coronavirus Task Force, says other states need to prepare to take on outbreaks of this scale. NPR's Noel King spoke with Dr. Fauci about where the U.S. is headed, and what strategies may help stop the spread of the coronavirus. He weighed in on increased testing capacity in the U.S. and on President Trump's comment that he hopes to see the . That, according to Fauci, remains to be seen. This interview has been edited for clarity and length. Earlier this week, an official with the World Health Organization warned that the United States could become the new epicenter of the virus — could it? Well, clearly in the beginning, China was the epicenter. Then it moved to Europe, particularly in Italy. And now we're seeing a rather substantial outbreak in the New York City metropolitan area. Now, there are a lot of other areas in the United States. But clearly, the acceleration of cases that we're seeing in New York City is really quite disturbing. Nearly half of all cases in the country right now are in the state of New York. What should hospitals in New York expect over the next few weeks? What they're seeing already, and we'll expect more, is an influx of cases which they're trying to deal with locally and with the help of the federal government, with regard to beds, ICU beds and ventilators. I am in close contact with Gov. Cuomo of New York and he's dealing with the federal government, with FEMA and other organizations to try to get to him the material and equipment that he will need. There are other states, including Florida, that are seeing a surge in cases reminiscent of what we saw in New York maybe a week ago. Should those states be looking at New York and thinking, that's what's going to happen here and we need to be prepared for that? Absolutely. That's the course of these types of outbreaks. So Florida has gotten hit both from internal [cases], but also from travel-related cases of people who leave New York, many of whom have second homes in Florida. So we're having a situation, as is predictable when you have outbreaks like this, that you seed different areas from hotspots. Right now, New York is bearing a major burden of the outbreak. But when people leave New York, they go other places. And that's the reason why yesterday at the White House press conference, we made the recommendation that when individuals leave New York, that when they get to [their] destination that they essentially self-isolate for 14 days, as well as monitor their own symptoms to make sure they don't get sick. And if they do, to actually report it to a health care provider. There's still some confusion about who should be getting tested. The president tweeted last night that testing in this country has increased significantly. He also said there is no need to test all 350 million or so Americans. So who should go and get the test? The president is correct on both counts that there are many, many, many more tests that are out there now than there were just a few weeks ago. The other thing that the president was referring to is he wants to make sure that those people who need the tests, get the tests first. Because right now, when you haven't had enough tests to give to everyone, you need to make sure that the people who are having symptoms and need to be diagnosed are the ones who get the tests, particularly those who are in the hospital. In South Korea, a country that has handled this virus remarkably well, they tested broadly. They tested everyone with symptoms and isolated those people and tested and isolated people they'd been in contact with. We don't have enough tests to do that. Is there a South Korea strategy for the U.S., or have we passed that point? Well, the United States is a big country and it isn't uni-dimensional. So what we're seeing, for example, is two components of how you address an outbreak. There's containment, in which you identify as best as you can each individual person who's infected. You identify them. You isolate them. You get them out of circulation and you do contact tracing. That's what we needed to do in situations before it became a massive outbreak. When you have a situation like we're seeing in New York, they're in what we call mitigation, because there's so many cases up there. They need to be able to take care of the people who are infected. Today the testing situation is infinitely better than what it was a few weeks ago. We now have hundreds of thousands of tests out there. And in the next week or so, we'll be having like a million a week. In the beginning, it was a slow start. But right now that the commercial firms have gotten involved, we really have caught up. And we will be seeing a much improved system with regard to the availability and the implementation of testing. Italy, the U.K. and India have all moved to lockdowns where they've suspended all nonessential activities. In India, people have been told not to leave their houses for three weeks. Should every state in the U.S. be doing this right now, given that we don't have enough testing to know where the next epicenter will be? I don't think that we should do this uniformly throughout the entire country. I mean, obviously, you'll always keep an open mind that you might have to revert to something like that. But today, there are clearly places that need to do that, and the governors are doing that. You saw what Governor Newsom did in California, we're seeing what Governor Cuomo has done in New York State and in New York City. And we're seeing versions of that in places like Louisiana. So you're going to be seeing more stringent shutdowns depending upon where you are. But there are regions of the country where rather than shut down, we should be doing the kind of containment, which is identifying, testing, contact tracing and isolating. At White House briefings, you and Dr. Deborah Birx have talked about an interesting scenario where scientists are able to gather data about cases all across this country and then policymakers can tailor their response based on local characteristics, like how bad is it here? Do you have the data you need now to tell different areas of the country they should be doing different things? We are quickly getting to the point where we will be able to get that data. But you are correct. To be honest, we don't have all that data now uniformly throughout the country to make those determinations. But that's a major, primary goal that we have right now, is to get those data, because you have to make informed decisions and your decisions are informed by the information you have. The president said this week that he'd like to see the economy reopened, up and running by Easter. That's April 12th. There seem to be real risks if states and communities come out of shutdowns too early. What are you advising right now? Should we even be considering April 12th? The president has set April 12th as an aspirational goal.He knows, and we've discussed this with him, that you have to be very flexible on that. He put that out because he wanted to give some hope to people. But he is not absolutely wed to that. And he keeps saying that although he would like that to be the date, he's open-minded and flexible to make sure that the facts and the pattern of the virus determine what we do. We have heard hopeful statements that warmer weather might slow this virus down. Does the science bear that out? You know, the science bears it out in part because if you look historically with viruses like influenza and some of the more common, benign coronaviruses, when the weather gets warmer, viruses don't do as well. And people tend to spend more time outdoors where the free flow of air is always good for preventing respiratory infections. That's a pattern that's real. What we don't know is whether this is going to happen with this virus because this is a unique virus, which we had no experience [with] before. We're hoping that's the case. We hope we get a respite as we get into April, May and June. Likely it will come around [again] next season because it's a very vigorous virus and we're seeing it already infecting people in the southern hemisphere. Now, as they enter into their winter. So I hope and I think we might get a respite with the weather, which would hopefully give us more time to better prepare for what might be a second round or a seasonal cycling. Emma Talkoff and H.J. Mai produced and edited this story for broadcast. Facebook Read more: NPR

TiredOfWinning And how many died for drunk driving and cancer and depression? Trump's vengeful lack of resourcing New York is a genocide. JoeNBC also calling for rational awareness. More than 250,000 innocent people are killed each year as a result of PREVENTABLE medical errors caused by Doctors, Nurses, and Pharmacists. Perspective.

Wonder if Mississippi and Alabama are listening yet? Sorry, doctor, but other states would rather tell their peasants to get back to work and die already. 328M - 1,000 = This is a highly contagious virus! Small states need to prepare not wait around. Also, Louisiana has a spike which I believe was attributed to Mardi Gra earlier this month! No more large events.

nprbusiness That Dr Fauci insistent on spreading truth. Lockdown now everywhere!

Birx and Fauci warn people leaving New York: ‘You may have been exposed’During the White House coronavirus task force briefing, Dr. Birx and Dr. Fauci supported Florida Gov. DeSantis’ order that all travelers from the New York area self-quarantine for 14 days, saying it is likely they were exposed to the virus. The Holy Spirit brings gifts to those that welcome him into their lives!! D,H,M,N key coronavirus

Scary Please lockdown Florida!

New Amsterdam Episode About Pandemic Wreaking Havoc on New York Shelved by NBCIn an essay published Wednesday, creator David Schulner explained the decision to pull the episode saying, “The world needs a lot less fiction right now, and a lot more fact'

New York sees some signs of progress against coronavirus as New Orleans hit hardGovernor Andrew Cuomo said New York City will close some public streets to vehicles, opening them up to pedestrian traffic to facilitate 'social distancing' to avoid coronavirus infections Wow... It’s a great idea. Wait... closing to vehicles, which are safer, and opening to crowds? I don't understand why he would do that. This. But permanently. Ty.

Coronavirus live updates: 192 dead in New York City; NYU offers medical students early graduationChurch leaders in Italy and Brazil pray before photos of the faithful sent in amid social distancing practices to stem the outbreak of COVID-19. No toke over the line... Nothing else to do is to burn!! AtHome Signs you may have a problem.....

Coronavirus deaths cross 192 in New York City; NYU offers medical students early graduationChinese state media footage shows firefighters disinfecting a train station in Wuhan as the city prepares for the restoration of public transport. 人才 I need that glue!😁 A little 'on-the-nose' ?

'Cacophony of coughing': Inside New York City's coronavirus-besieged ERsNew York City’s hospitals have become the war-zone-like epicenter of the nation’s coronavirus crisis.



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