More Companies Consider Helping Workers Pay Student Loans

As employers seek to hire and keep workers in a challenging job market, more are weighing offering help with student debt repayments as a job benefit.

Federal Student Loans, Student Debt

1/29/2022 12:32:00 AM

As employers seek to hire and keep workers in a challenging job market, more are weighing offering help with student debt repayments as a job benefit.

As employers seek to hire and keep workers in a challenging job market, more are weighing offering help with student debt repayments as a job benefit. That is good news for student loan borrowers because a freeze on federal student loan payments, part of the government’s pandemic relief effort, is scheduled to end May 1. Millions of borrowers — many of whom have not made loan payments in nearly two years — will once again have to start paying their monthly bill. Sign up for The Morning newslette

6 min readThat is good news for student loan borrowers because a freeze on federal student loan payments, part of the government’s pandemic relief effort, is scheduled to end May 1. Millions of borrowers — many of whom have not made loan payments in nearly two years — will once again have to start paying their monthly bill.

But there are signs of renewed interest among both borrowers and employers as the pause expires and employers seek to hire and hold on to increasingly emboldened workers.In 2019, typical borrowers with any remaining debt from their own education owed $20,000 to $25,000, and the typical required monthly payment was $200 to $300, according to a report from the Federal Reserve.

Read more: Yahoo News »

Ohio’s abortion trigger law could outlaw in vitro fertilization: Today in Ohio

Editor Chris Quinn hosts Today in Ohio, cleveland.com's daily half-hour news podcast, today with city hall reporter Courtney Astolfi, editorial board member Lisa Garvin and content director Laura Johnston. Read more >>

Federal student loan forgiveness program fulfills an elusive promise: To erase debtsAs of last week, more than 70,000 borrowers have qualified for debt forgiveness since the Biden administration began relaxing stringent rules around Public Service Loan Forgiveness last fall. POTUS No military budget increase for Ukraine until $ is spent on taxpayers 1st. Govt owns 92% of Student loans, making interest off of taxpayers! Discounting corporate tax 14% in corporate welfare. Making war profiteers rich. DoSomethingforTaxpayers Cancel92%StudentDebt The Dems are spending the next President into financial ruin. How about substitute teachers? We go in when teachers call out because of the pandemic. The caste system ignores our contributions!

Hiring and keeping workers amid the 'Great Resignation'With a worker shortage, companies are having to get creative to hire and keep workers. And workers have more power than they did just a few years ago.

85 Democrats Demand Immediate Release of Memo on Biden’s Legal Authority to Cancel Student DebtOver 80 Democrats have demanded that Biden should immediately cancel up to $50,000 of student debt per borrower. Wow, that's a super minority.

Where Biden Stands On Student Loan CancellationHere’s where President Joe Biden stands on student loan cancellation Universities will not let Biden do it. Only chance is if a huge debt strike is organized, similar to what the truckers are doing in Canada to stop the vaccine mandate. Need millions to shut down George Washington Bridge for Biden to act! PresidentMBNA CreditCardJoe DebtStrike Still not an excuse the legal powers to abuse student who have their student loan documents robbed and try to attack their communication and create checkpoints for them, and try to evade the International Court of Justice.

US jobless claims drop to 260K as employers weather OmicronThe number of American workers filing unemployment claims declined as expected this week as US companies and workers weather the effects of the Omicron variant.

Activision Refuses to Recognize Raven Software's UnionActivision Blizzard released a statement against recognizing the Raven Software's union efforts, stating how much they care about workers (not the many they let go in Dec though)

Read full article January 28, 2022, 8:32 PM · 6 min read As employers seek to hire and keep workers in a challenging job market, more are weighing offering help with student debt repayments as a job benefit. (Till Lauer/The New York Times) As employers seek to hire and keep workers in a challenging job market, more are weighing offering help with student debt repayments as a job benefit. That is good news for student loan borrowers because a freeze on federal student loan payments, part of the government’s pandemic relief effort, is scheduled to end May 1. Millions of borrowers — many of whom have not made loan payments in nearly two years — will once again have to start paying their monthly bill. Sign up for The Morning newsletter from the New York Times Student debt repayment programs were a hot topic in 2019, but companies’ interest ebbed in the pandemic, said Craig Copeland, senior research associate with the Employee Benefit Research Institute, as the pause on federal student debt payments temporarily took pressure off borrowers. Employers shifted their focus to programs offering more immediate help, like emergency savings and hardship payments. But there are signs of renewed interest among both borrowers and employers as the pause expires and employers seek to hire and hold on to increasingly emboldened workers. The institute’s 2021 survey of employers’ “financial well-being” benefits found that about 17% of large employers — those with 500 or more workers — offered some form of student debt assistance. Of those, nearly one-third (30%) offered direct loan subsidies and an additional 40% said they planned to start offering direct help in the next year or two. “I would think adoption would start ticking up as we get to a more normal work environment,” Copeland said. In 2019, typical borrowers with any remaining debt from their own education owed $20,000 to $25,000, and the typical required monthly payment was $200 to $300, according to a report from the Federal Reserve. A Fidelity Investments survey in October of about 1,600 employers of varying sizes found that more than one-quarter (29%) offered a contribution to student debt as a benefit. And more employers are likely to consider it now that the federal loan payment pause is scheduled to expire. Story continues “It’s creating a sense of urgency right now,” said Jesse Moore, head of student debt at Fidelity, which administers student debt repayment programs for clients and offers a benefit to its own employees. (It recently increased the maximum benefit to $15,000 from $10,000.) A big factor is that under the federal government’s pandemic relief programs enacted in 2020, employers are able to make tax-exempt loan repayment contributions to their employees of up to $5,250 a year through 2025. Employees do not have to pay income taxes on the benefit. (Previously, unlike tuition assistance payments for employees enrolled in college, loan repayment contributions were taxable.) McLaren Northern Michigan Hospital in Petoskey, Michigan, is among the employers that have added a direct assistance benefit. The hospital began offering student loan aid this month, joining two other hospitals in its health system, said Todd Burch, McLaren Northern’s president and CEO. It has become especially difficult to keep nurses, Burch said, because they are increasingly able to work on lucrative mobile assignments as travel nurses. “We’re looking for unique offerings to recruit and retain top talent,” he said. The benefit is available to all employees after they have worked at the hospital for six months and pays $200 a month in the first year, $300 monthly in the second year and $400 monthly in the third year, with a maximum benefit of $12,000. (Benefits are prorated for part-time workers.) Already, 91 employees have applied for the benefit. McLaren works with Goodly, a startup that manages student loan payment benefits for companies. Workers submit their loan information to Goodly, which verifies the worker’s eligibility and transmits payments from the employer to the lender. Esker, a software company with U.S. headquarters in Wisconsin, began offering the benefit in 2019. The company generally hires workers directly from college, so education loans are often a concern, said Anne Donarski, the company’s director of finance and administration. “We know student debt is becoming an increasing burden,” she said. Employees are eligible from their first day on the job, but the contribution increases with their tenure at the company — from $100 a month to start, up to $150 a month, payable over five years. The company has about 200 employees, and 55 use the benefit. Esker has so far paid about $186,000 in loan help, Donarski said. Here are some questions and answers about student loan repayment benefits: Q: What types of loans are eligible for repayment benefits? A: Details vary by employer, so it is best to ask, if you are considering joining a company because of its student debt benefits. For a student loan to be repaid by an employer tax-free, it must be borrowed in the employee’s name and used for the employee’s education, said Greg Poulin, co-founder and CEO of Goodly. (Some employers may choose to repay loans held by a worker’s spouse or child, he said, but the income then becomes taxable.) In general, both federally held loans and those borrowed from a private lender are eligible for the benefit. Q: Do all student loan assistance programs offer direct payment? A; Direct payment “is the richest benefit,” said Moore at Fidelity. But some companies may offer alternatives, like payments tied to the company’s 401(k) retirement plan. Workers make student loan payments themselves, and then the company deposits a corresponding “match” into the employee’s 401(k) account. (Legislation pending in Congress aims to make it easier for employers to offer this option.) Another option that companies may offer includes help with refinancing student debt. But make sure you understand the details of any plan before you enroll. Refinancing federal student loans, for instance, means giving up borrower protections that are not available with private loans. “Borrowers should be careful about what they’re getting,” said Mike Pierce, executive director of the Student Borrower Protection Center. Q: How likely is it that the government will cancel student debt? A: The complete cancellation of federal student loans is unlikely. President Joe Biden has voiced support in the past for canceling $10,000 of student debt per borrower, while Democrats like Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Chuck Schumer, the majority leader, are pressuring the president to cancel $50,000 per borrower, by executive action if necessary. Sandy Baum, a nonresident senior fellow at the Urban Institute’s Center on Education Data and Policy, said in an email that she suspected that the administration might target forgiveness to specific groups of borrowers, like those who were victims of fraud and abuse. But blanket forgiveness, whether by executive action or by legislation, “seems unlikely,” she said. © 2022 The New York Times Company Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting Recommended Stories