Marilyn Monroe was a brunette. Here are 10 common misconceptions about the Hollywood bombshell

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Entertainment, Marilyn Monroe Was A Brunette. Here Are 10 Things You Don't Know About The Hollywood Bombshell - Cn

1/17/2022 12:00:00 AM

Marilyn Monroe's personality has been transformed into a larger-than-life caricature, but in many ways her legacy has been misunderstood

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(CNN)Marilyn Monroe is one of the most well-known celebrities of all time. As a household name whose work has been referenced in everything from"Moulin Rouge" to"Ru Paul's Drag Race," the Golden Age actress was able to make a widespread impact during her short career.

With such great notoriety, comes a tendency for mythmaking. Monroe's personality has been transformed into a larger-than-life caricature, her most iconic looks have come to define her entire image, but in many ways her legacy has been misunderstood. Here are ten things people tend to get wrong about Marilyn Monroe. 1. Her name was Marilyn Monroe Though it's the name she's best known by, the name Marilyn Monroe was not the first name to be donned by the California native Norma Jeane Mortenson. After her birth, she was baptized with her mother's name: Norma Jeane Baker. She carried that name with her through foster care until she married a neighbor at age 16 and became Norma Jeane Dougherty. Read More Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in pictures Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesAmerican film star Marilyn Monroe poses for a portrait in 1954.Hide Caption 1 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesNorma Jeane Mortenson, who later changed her name to Marilyn Monroe, was born in 1926 in Los Angeles. Hide Caption 2 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesChildhood was very difficult for Monroe. Her mother, Gladys Baker, lived in a mental health facility after being diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia. She didn't know her father.Hide Caption 3 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesAs a teen, she lived at an orphanage and then with a series of foster families. The place where young Marilyn felt happy and safe was at the movies."I watched all kinds of movies like 'Cleopatra' with Claudette Colbert, and I'd see it over and over and over and over again," she said.Hide Caption 4 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesWhen Monroe was 16 years old, she married her neighbor, Jim Dougherty, who she barely knew. The marriage lasted four year.

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Remember when Marilyn Monroe declared diamonds are a girl's best friend?Marilyn Monroe's iconic pink dress in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes was, in fact, a last-minute alternative. The original, far more revealing costume was ditched because of a scandal involving a nude photograph of the star. Do u want to rank your videos on first page of YOUTUBE? Then you need proper SEO of your videos. Check out this for best service: BillsMafia Australia Bengals NFLPlayoffs JeanClaudeLord lmao nowadays anyone barely knows who she was

CNN’s Marilyn Monroe Docuseries Is Ridiculously ReductiveThe four-part docuseries “Reframed: Marilyn Monroe” seeks to re-cast the dynamic, brilliant, and complicated screen icon in 21st-century terms, doing her no favors. In other words they didn't want to know her in her world, just their world - and pass judgement.

Opinion: I'd like to introduce you to the real Marilyn MonroeIt's vanishingly difficult for Marilyn Monroe to be seen as an actual human being. Not after this many decades of being a symbol, a sex goddess, a blonde bombshell or a candle in the wind. As author Sarah Churchwell, whose book The Many Lives of Marilyn Monroe, has said, 'What we think about Marilyn is what we think about women.' In the 1950s, that proved to be a damning indictment. Couple of (5) months trading with rookiexbtrade are always profitable, I earn good return trading Bitcoin with Adriel and make huge profit, i withdraw my profit and convert to cash in the bank, DM him now and start earning massively. Bullsh*t, Monroe was a sex toy. FOREVER STAR

CNN’s Marilyn Monroe Docuseries Is Ridiculously ReductiveThe four-part docuseries “Reframed: Marilyn Monroe” seeks to re-cast the dynamic, brilliant, and complicated screen icon in 21st-century terms, doing her no favors. In other words they didn't want to know her in her world, just their world - and pass judgement.

Opinion: I'd like to introduce you to the real Marilyn MonroeIt's vanishingly difficult for Marilyn Monroe to be seen as an actual human being. Not after this many decades of being a symbol, a sex goddess, a blonde bombshell or a candle in the wind. As author Sarah Churchwell, whose book The Many Lives of Marilyn Monroe, has said, 'What we think about Marilyn is what we think about women.' In the 1950s, that proved to be a damning indictment. Couple of (5) months trading with rookiexbtrade are always profitable, I earn good return trading Bitcoin with Adriel and make huge profit, i withdraw my profit and convert to cash in the bank, DM him now and start earning massively. Bullsh*t, Monroe was a sex toy. FOREVER STAR

Remember when Marilyn Monroe declared diamonds are a girl's best friend?Marilyn Monroe's iconic pink dress in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes was, in fact, a last-minute alternative. The original, far more revealing costume was ditched because of a scandal involving a nude photograph of the star. Do u want to rank your videos on first page of YOUTUBE? Then you need proper SEO of your videos. Check out this for best service: BillsMafia Australia Bengals NFLPlayoffs JeanClaudeLord lmao nowadays anyone barely knows who she was

To learn more about Marilyn Monroe's life and legacy, check out the new CNN Original Series "Reframed: Marilyn Monroe" premiering Sunday, January 16, at 9 p.m. ET with back-to back episodes. (CNN)Marilyn Monroe is one of the most well-known celebrities of all time. As a household name whose work has been referenced in everything from"Moulin Rouge" to"Ru Paul's Drag Race," the Golden Age actress was able to make a widespread impact during her short career. With such great notoriety, comes a tendency for mythmaking. Monroe's personality has been transformed into a larger-than-life caricature, her most iconic looks have come to define her entire image, but in many ways her legacy has been misunderstood. Here are ten things people tend to get wrong about Marilyn Monroe. 1. Her name was Marilyn Monroe Though it's the name she's best known by, the name Marilyn Monroe was not the first name to be donned by the California native Norma Jeane Mortenson. After her birth, she was baptized with her mother's name: Norma Jeane Baker. She carried that name with her through foster care until she married a neighbor at age 16 and became Norma Jeane Dougherty. Read More Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in pictures Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesAmerican film star Marilyn Monroe poses for a portrait in 1954.Hide Caption 1 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesNorma Jeane Mortenson, who later changed her name to Marilyn Monroe, was born in 1926 in Los Angeles. Hide Caption 2 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesChildhood was very difficult for Monroe. Her mother, Gladys Baker, lived in a mental health facility after being diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia. She didn't know her father.Hide Caption 3 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesAs a teen, she lived at an orphanage and then with a series of foster families. The place where young Marilyn felt happy and safe was at the movies."I watched all kinds of movies like 'Cleopatra' with Claudette Colbert, and I'd see it over and over and over and over again," she said.Hide Caption 4 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesWhen Monroe was 16 years old, she married her neighbor, Jim Dougherty, who she barely knew. The marriage lasted four year. The marriage was the idea of her foster mother, Grace McKee."Grace arranged it. She and her husband were going to West Virginia, and they were going to put me in a home, or I could marry this boy who was 21," she said.Hide Caption 5 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesAt 19 years old, Monroe tried her luck with the Blue Book Model Agency."Norma Jeane looked like the girl next door, and I thought I could make her into something quite marketable in a short length of time," said Emmeline Snively, the owner of the Blue Book Model Agency."She was very beautiful in a clean-cut American wholesome way."Hide Caption 6 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesIn 1947, Monroe signed a contract with 20th Century Fox. She went to the studio every day doing photo shoots or taking acting classes. "I said, 'Why do you work so hard? The other kids that are under contract. I call sometimes at 11:00, 12:00, they're still sleeping from being out the night before.'"recalled Ben Lyons, casting director at 20th Century Fox."She said, 'Well, Mr. Lyon.' She said, 'I work hard because one day, maybe opportunity will knock, and I want to be prepared.'"Hide Caption 7 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesThe head of Columbia Pictures insisted Monroe make big changes to her look before he'd cast her in a movie. This is when she transformed into a platinum blonde. "It was the ultimate Hollywood look, the ultimate star image. It's almost unearthly. It's almost like an angel with, like, glowing hair," said actress Mira Sorvino.Hide Caption 8 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesWithin a month of signing with Columbia Pictures, 21-year-old Monroe landed her first starring role as a burlesque dancer in a low-budget musical. In the"Ladies of the Chorus," she played a chorus girl named Peggy Martin, who was courted by a lovestruck fan.Hide Caption 9 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesMonroe starred in several musicals. Picture here, she's taking singing lessons with jazz musician Phil Moore at the Mocambo, the famous West Hollywood nightclub, in 1948.Hide Caption 10 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesMonroe is seen sitting on a train to Warrenburg, New York, to present the keys to a new house to a winner of a Photoplay Magazine contest in 1949. Photoplay Magazine was an American film fan magazine. Monroe was on the cover in 1953.Hide Caption 11 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesShe was in several movies in 1950, including"The Asphalt Jungle" and"All About Eve." Seen here, Monroe is reading sheet music while sitting on a bedroom floor with a tape player on her side.Hide Caption 12 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesWhen she was out of contract, media-savvy Monroe used photo shoots to get her noticed. In this photo session, she's at the home of her first major movie agent, Johnny Hyde. He was one of the most powerful agents in Hollywood in the 1950s. "She loves to be in front of the camera," said photographer Nancy Lee Andrews."She's staging it, and the photographer, he's clicking it... Follow Marilyn, and you'll get the shot."Hide Caption 13 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesMonroe fixes her hair in front of a mirror in 1951. That year she had several supporting roles in comedies, including"As Young as You Feel,""Love Nest" and"Let's Make It Legal." "If you happen to have blonde hair, you're considered dumb. I don't know why that is. It's very -- I think it's a very limited view," Monroe said at the time.Hide Caption 14 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesMonroe wins a trophy at the"Star Of Tomorrow" Awards in Los Angeles in 1952.Hide Caption 15 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesBy the 1950s, Monroe was a household name. In 1953, she made history by becoming the first cover and centerfold of"Playboy" magazine. In this photo, Monroe is playing the drums with the Ray Anthony Band.Hide Caption 16 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesIn her biggest budget movie to date, Monroe starred in"Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" in 1953. In the musical comedy film, she sings the famous song"Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend." Hide Caption 17 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesIn"How To Marry A Millionaire," Monroe starred alongside David Wayne. The movie was Marilyn's third hit of 1953, earning Fox a total of $15 million, the equivalent of $150 million today."There are not many Hollywood actresses of that era that combined clear physical attractiveness and physical comedy of a slapstick style like she does in 'How to Marry a Millionaire,' where she's a bit blind and keeps running into walls," said film critic Christina Newland.Hide Caption 18 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesShe developed her sexy on-screen persona and become an even larger-than-life celebrity."She realized, 'People wanna come snap pictures of me. People wanna know about me.' She was sort of an original Kardashian in that way," said actress Amber Tamblyn.Hide Caption 19 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesMonroe and"Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" co-star Jane Russell place their hands in cement at Grauman's Chinese Theatre. The musical comedy topped the box office in 1953.Hide Caption 20 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesMonroe and former Yankees baseball player Joe DiMaggio leave city hall after their wedding. After two years of dating, their marriage captivated the nation in 1954."He has a very sensitive nature in many respects. When he was young, he had a very difficult time. So he understood some things about me, and I understood some things about him," Monroe said. Hide Caption 21 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesThousands of US Marines stationed in Korea gathered to listen to Monroe sing."The highlight of my life was singing for the soldiers there," she said."I stood out on an open stage, and it was cold, but I swear I didn't feel a thing except good."Hide Caption 22 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesThis is the most iconic image of Monroe's career. While filming for"The Seven Year Itch" in New York, she posed over a subway grate as the breeze sent her dress flying. The crowd shouted"higher" each time a blast of wind lifted her dress. It took 14 takes and the scene was later re-shot at a studio lot in California. "We thought it would be over in a minute and a half. It was two hours of craziness," said Amy Greene, Monroe's friend, who was at the New York shoot. Hide Caption 23 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesWeeks after"The Seven Year Itch" shoot, Monroe and her attorney announced her divorce from DiMaggio."Our marriage wasn't a happy one. It ended in nine months, unfortunately. And I don't know what else to say," Monroe said. The flashy scene in New York was one of many straws that allegedly ended their tumultuous marriage."After about the tenth of the skirt going up, he began to tremble," said Monroe's friend Amy Greene."And I put my hand on his arm and said, 'Joe, it's just a movie. It's not real.' And he said, 'I realize that, but it's my wife showing off her panties.'"Hide Caption 24 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesMonroe is seen with singer Ella Fitzgerald at the Tiffany Club in Hollywood, California, in 1954."My very favorite person, and I love her as a person as well as a singer, I think she's the greatest, and that's Ella Fitzgerald," said Monroe.Hide Caption 25 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesMonroe left Hollywood for New York in an effort to be seen as a serious artist. She wanted to stop being typecast as a dumb blonde, and she believed New York was where real art was being made. She embraced the city."It's the people. I like the streets. The atmosphere, I just like it," Monroe said. Seen here, Monroe leans over the balcony of the Ambassador Hotel in New York in 1955.Hide Caption 26 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesIn a photoshoot with Redbook magazine, Monroe posed by the subway in Grand Central Station in New York. She positioned herself as an everyday kind of girl."In fact, Marilyn never really did ride the subway, but the important thing is she saw herself as a woman who rode the subway," said biographer Elizabeth Winder.Hide Caption 27 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesHolding two telephones, Monroe poses at the 20th Century Fox film set. In 1956, she starred in the drama"Bus Stop." She played a saloon singer with an Ozark accent."She did the hardest thing to do. She chose to play it like somebody who is not very good at what they do but trying really hard to be good," said actress Ellen Burstyn. Hide Caption 28 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesMonroe marries playwright Arthur Miller in 1956."He treated me as a human being. And he was a very sensitive human being and treated me as a sensitive person also," she said. Correction: A previous version of this caption incorrectly stated the year Monroe married Miller.Hide Caption 29 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesMonroe blows out the candle on 30th birthday cake. Hide Caption 30 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesMonroe rides her bike with her third husband Miller. He's best known for writing the play Death of a Salesman.Hide Caption 31 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesQueen Elizabeth II meets Monroe at the Royal Command Film Performance in London in 1956. Monroe went to England to film"The Prince and the Showgirl" with actor Laurence Olivier.Hide Caption 32 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesPlaying Sugar Kane, Monroe sings and plays the ukulele in the movie"Some Like It Hot." The film is one of her greatest performances."When I knew I had the final shots, there was a moment of 'never again,'" said film director Billy Wilder."Well, all I can tell you is if Marilyn was around today, I would be on my knees, 'Please, let's do it again.'"Hide Caption 33 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesMonroe leaves Polyclinic Hospital in New York after a gall bladder surgery in 1961. As she was rolled out in a wheel chair, she was surrounded by crowds.Hide Caption 34 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesDuring the filming of"Something's Got to Give," Monroe swims in the nude. The 1962 movie was never completed due to Monroe's sudden death during production. In released clips, Monroe is seen playing a mother."It naturally brings a certain softness. You can't help but to wonder what could have been. And I'm sure I'm not the only person to have thought that while watching those scenes," said film critic Christina Newland.Hide Caption 35 of 36 Photos: Marilyn Monroe's life in picturesPresident John F. Kennedy (with his back to the camera), US Attorney General Robert Kennedy (far left), and Monroe on the President's 45th birthday. Monroe flew to New York to sing him a very erotic version of"Happy Birthday." She wore a beige rhinestone-encrusted dress. It's said the dress was so tight that she had to be sewn into it before getting on stage. "I was honored when they asked me to appear at Madison Square Garden. You know, I was a little worried about my voice, but it came out," Monroe said. The dress sold for $4.8 million in an auction 2016, breaking its own record as the most expensive personal item of clothing.Hide Caption 36 of 36It wasn't until she signed her first acting contract with 20th Century Fox that she began to contemplate the perfect stage name. Monroe and studio executive Ben Lyon put their heads together to come up with the moniker that would help catapult her to superstardom. Lyon suggested Marilyn after actress Marilyn Miller and Norma Jeane suggested Monroe after her mother's family. Thus, the name Marilyn Monroe was conceived; her iconic look and personality soon to follow. 2. She was a natural blonde Monroe's iconic platinum blonde locks were bottle-born, like many other stars' at the time. For women hoping to make a name for themselves in the film industry in the 1940s, blonde was considered the most versatile hair color. Monroe, who joined her first modeling agency as a curly haired brunette, was dedicated to doing whatever it took to get noticed. She started lightening her hair in the mid-1940s and was instantly hooked."For Marilyn, going blonde, it was like the Hollywood star-building machine," said photographer Nancy Lee Andrews,"she saw what it could do for her." Over the years, Marilyn continued to lighten her hair until it eventually reached its iconic platinum blonde shade, or as she referred to it"pillow case white." The color is still associated with her to this day, referenced everywhere from magazines to Billie Eilish's Met Gala appearance. 3. She was discovered while babysitting With a name locked in and a new hairstyle, the next step for the up-and-coming starlet was crafting a good origin story. The publicists at 20th Century Fox pitched Monroe to the press as a young orphan who was discovered while babysitting for a Fox talent scout. In reality, Monroe fought for her opportunities and was eager to learn the ins and outs of the film industry. As Sarah Churchwell, author of"The Many Lives of Marilyn Monroe" puts it,"Marilyn was not waiting for powerful men to come find her. She was pounding on the door of the studio. She was doing absolutely everything that she could to break into the movie business." 4. She gained fame easily Stardom did not simply fall into Marilyn Monroe's lap. Beauty and talent were seen as basic necessities for any woman hoping to work in the male-dominated film industry and actors needed a contract with the"Big Five'' -- Warner Brothers, RKO, MGM, Paramount or 20th Century Fox -- to succeed. Monroe struggled to gain a long-term contract. She landed small roles with 20th Century Fox and Columbia Pictures before finally getting a seven-year contract with Fox in 1951. What she lacked in immediate success on-screen, though, she gained back with a tenacious understanding of her audience off-screen. Monroe was able to use press coverage, like leveraging her relationship with Joe DiMaggio, to keep her name relevant. As Alicia Malone of Turner Classic Movies explains, Marilyn was,"very, very smart about publicity and very funny. Marilyn always seemed to know what publicists wanted, what photographers wanted. So whenever she was presented with an opportunity, she made the most of it."5. She had no control over her sexuality Sex sells, and if anyone knew this, it was Monroe. While she was frustrated with the tendency for the press and film executives to reduce her to a sex symbol and nothing more, Monroe understood the power her unique sexuality could get her. Over and over, she was typecast in roles meant to look good on-screen and little else, but she wouldn't allow the transaction to go one way. Remember when Marilyn Monroe's white cocktail dress made movie history?"She manages to be sexually attractive, and the object of the male gaze in all of the ways that she needs to be," says Sarah Churchwell of Monroe's early performance in"Ladies of the Chorus,""but she's also making fun of it. And that is the moment at which Marilyn discovered how this performance was going to work for her." Not only did Monroe lean into her status as a sex bomb, she also refused to be ashamed of it. Early in her career, Monroe posed nude for a photographer while strapped for money. Rather than capitulate to the popular conservatism of the time when the photoshoot was exposed in the press, Marilyn stood by her decision. "They said,"Did you pose for a calendar?'" recalled Monroe,"and I said,"Yes, anything wrong?'"6. She never spoke out against sexism in Hollywood The studio system in the 1940s and 1950s treated women like commodities; sex and relationships were exchanged and often expected in return for auditions and contracts. Monroe was not exempt from participating, and she received a lot of unwanted advances as she worked toward a career in acting. At Columbia Pictures, studio head Harry Cohn invited Monroe on a trip on his yacht. Monroe suggested she would only come along if Cohn's wife was also invited. Soon after her rejection, she was dropped from her contract. Decades before the Times Up movement, Monroe detailed the harassment she faced in an article called"Wolves I Have Known" published in"Motion Picture and Television Magazine". She wrote,"there are many types of wolves. Some are sinister, others are just good-time Charlies trying to get something for nothing and others make a game of it." She called out the powerful men she'd faced as an up-and-comer and shined a light on the unsafe conditions women were forced to endure if they wanted a career in motion pictures. 7. She wasn't a serious actorMonroe is known for her iconic roles where she played ditzy blondes, but behind the scenes she was anything but mindless. Early in her career, she sought out guidance from Natasha Lytess, the head of drama at Columbia Pictures. According to"Marilyn Monroe: The Personal Archive" author Cindy de la Hoz, Lytess brought a"wealth of knowledge about theater [that] was very enticing to Marilyn. She wanted to get this kind of serious education about acting."Even after she'd achieved major success in her career, Monroe continued to seek out opportunities to become a more serious actor. She enrolled in classes with Lee Strasberg at the Actors Studio in New York, where her peers looked down on the flashy careers of movie stars like her. But Monroe was a dedicated student of method acting, and she gained the respect of her classmates with her hard work.Actress Ellen Burstyn witnessed Marilyn's portrayal of Anna Christie at the studio."Everybody who saw that says that it was not only the best work Marilyn ever did, it was some of the best work ever seen at Studio," she recalled."She achieved real greatness in that scene."8. She wasn't politically active Marilyn Monroe had strong political convictions. After her marriage to Joe DiMaggio in 1954, Marilyn took a detour from their honeymoon in Japan to tour American military bases in Korea. She performed for an estimated 100,000 military men over the course of ten shows. Monroe supported her friends at home as well. She was very close to singer Ella Fitzgerald and a big advocate in her career. When the popular nightclub Mocambo refused to book Fitzgerald, Monroe called the club and proposed that if they booked Fitzgerald for a week, she would sit in the front row for every performance. After the club agreed, Fitzgerald sold out and was subsequently booked for a second week. The success brought her career to a whole new level.In a 1972 interview with Ms. magazine, Fitzgerald recalled her relationship with Monroe saying,"I owe Marilyn Monroe a real debt...she was an unusual woman -- a little ahead of her times. And she didn't know it."9. She was paid like a big star Though she was one of the most talked about actors of the time period, Marilyn's star power did not always result in a hefty paycheck. At the end of her career, she was making a fraction of the money her contemporaries were making. In the last film she worked on,"Something's Gotta Give," Monroe was set to earn $100,000, much less than the reported $1 million Elizabeth Taylor was making for"Cleopatra" around the same time. The pay disparity was even worse earlier in her career, but Monroe put up a fight. In 1954, Monroe was set to begin working on the film"The Girl in Pink Tights" when she learned her costar Frank Sinatra was set to make over three times her weekly salary. In protest, Marilyn refused to show up to the set, forcing the movie to delay and eventually stop production entirely."For anyone who thinks Monroe was a perpetual victim, she walked off the set of 'Pink Tights,'"noted film critic Molly Haskell."Enough said." 10. She didn't impact the industry Though she loved to act, Monroe was largely unhappy with the roles she was offered with 20th Century Fox. She longed to add more diversity and depth to her characters. After shooting wrapped for"The Seven Year Itch," Monroe broke her contract and fled Los Angeles.Despite threatening phone calls from Fox's legal teams and studio head Daryl Zanuck, Monroe took up a new life in New York City. She and her friend, photographer Milton Greene, created Marilyn Monroe Productions, making her the first woman since Mary Pickford to start her own production company. Fox tried to diminish Monroe's accomplishments by proposing that they could find a dozen actresses just like her, but Marilyn's brand only grew bigger. She couldn't be replaced. At the end of 1955, Fox surrendered and Monroe received a new, landmark contract. Not only was her salary boosted, but she was also granted story approval, director approval, and cinematographer approval -- an accomplishment"veterans of the movie scene said ... was one of the greatest single triumphs ever won by an actress" reported the"Los Angeles Mirror." The studio system that dictated so much of Monroe's career was beginning to break. Though she was not around to experience the development of the industry in the '60s and beyond, the rippling effects of her efforts can still be seen today.For updates on CNN's Original Series and Films, sign up for our weekly Keep Watching newsletter.