LDS Church denied him financial help, so he wrote a musical about its wealth.

Three years ago, Utah musician David Nolan said he was denied financial help from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints despite its wealth. So he wrote a parody musical about how rich the church is.

The Church Of Jesus Christ Of Latter-Day Saints, Latter-Day Saints

12/26/2021 6:51:00 PM

When Latter-day Saint and musician David Nolan was denied financial help by Ch_JesusChrist, he didn't stop believing, and he didn't stop paying tithing. But he did write ' The Good Shepherds ,' a satirical show about the church’s billions.

Three years ago, Utah musician David Nolan said he was denied financial help from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints despite its wealth. So he wrote a parody musical about how rich the church is.

Editor’s noteWhen Latter-day Saint David Nolan heard about the billions his church squirrels away for a “But he didn’t leave the faith. He didn’t stop believing. He didn’t stop attending services. He didn’t stop paying tithing.bit.ly/3p4F38Iaccused of amassing deep dollars intended for, but not spent on, charity

He also said Latter-day Saints should have no problem attending “The Good Shepherds.” It’s not like “Rather, Nolan said, “The Good Shepherds” steers clear of everything members consider sacred (such as prophets and temples) and aims its satire solely at the church’s money.

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Yrs ago, I worked for Deseret Trust, a holding co for the LDS Church. I remember filing stock certificates for holdings in cigarette cos and beer cos (which they forbid) and agreements from members signing property to them upon their death. It’s all about the money. taxchurches I can’t read this because this liberal paper requires a subscription (which they will never get). Convince me that the most giving religion in the world is actually turning help away from someone in need. If it doesn’t make sense, it probably isn’t.

Hoarding wealth starts at the top. Look no further than Ensign Peak Advisors. There’s approx 150 billion and still growing from tithing. One of the greatest grifts of all time and those giving do it willingly and freely. TaxTheChurches Patbagley I love all these people thinking a religion that professes to help those in time of need would help them. The religion is there to make money. If you haven't been part of some natural disaster that they can solicit funds from members for, you are out of luck.

My grandfather, a dedicated and life long member of the LDS faith, was in dire need once of financial assistance with hospital bills for his wife, suffering a terrible stroke which eventually killed her. He was not given one penny by the church. Ch_JesusChrist Paying the LDS church tithing will get you to heaven as fast as Jeff Bezos’s dick rocket. Bezos will at least get you into space.

Ch_JesusChrist Mormon Mafia under the disguise of religion. Ch_JesusChrist Utah was once a great State, now they cheat in elections. Susan's Husband tweeted. Ch_JesusChrist The Tribune just eats this stuff up. To them this is news. Ch_JesusChrist So let me get this correct… Even if you pay the mandatory minimum price for eternal salvation, the church can still revoke assistance in THIS world? Can people leaving the church ask for their tithing back since they won’t be going into Mormon heaven?

Ch_JesusChrist Trib loves to harp on this topic with blithe disregard & (at this point) willful and premeditated ignorance to the realities of running a global church, the challenges of responsible dispensing of aid, and prudent balancing of priorities and needs across time and around the world

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Ch_JesusChrist The LDS church is a money cult for unintelligent people

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Latter-day Saint David Nolan is sticking with his faith, but his satire, “The Good Shepherds,” pokes fun at its riches and urges a “conversation” about how to use all that money. (Provided by David Nolan) David Nolan's satirical musical "The Good Shepherds" pokes fun at the LDS church's vast wealth. | Dec. 26, 2021, 3:11 p.m. Editor’s note • This story is available to Salt Lake Tribune subscribers only. Thank you for supporting local journalism. When Latter-day Saint David Nolan heard about the billions his church squirrels away for a “ rainy day ,” he wasn’t pleased. But he didn’t leave the faith. He didn’t stop believing. He didn’t stop attending services. He didn’t stop paying tithing. Instead, he wrote a musical. “The Good Shepherds” — a satirical show about the church’s wealth — will debut March 21-23 at Peery’s Egyptian Theater in Ogden. (Tickets start at $19, plus a $5 processing fee, and are available online at bit.ly/3p4F38I .) Despite the topic, Nolan is adamant that he’s not bitter at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which has been accused of amassing deep dollars intended for, but not spent on, charity . “The value [of the church] still outweighs the negative,” he said. “Let’s have a social conversation about the value of a human life versus the value of [billions] in stocks just sitting there.” He also said Latter-day Saints should have no problem attending “The Good Shepherds.” It’s not like “ The Book of Mormon” musical , he said, the raunchy Tony-winning Broadway hit that mercilessly mocks many of the faith’s beliefs and practices. Rather, Nolan said, “The Good Shepherds” steers clear of everything members consider sacred (such as prophets and temples) and aims its satire solely at the church’s money. He even feels that most of the music was “completely inspired,” he said. “Some of the songs just poured into my mind and poured onto the piano keys.” ‘Like a punch to the face’ (Provided by David Nolan) David Nolan's satirical musical "The Good Shepherds" pokes fun at the LDS Church's vast wealth. Nolan is pictured here at Paris' Palais Garnier, a place he said provided him with "quite a bit" of inspiration for the production. The project got its start three years ago, when Nolan — a Cache Valley resident, musician and father of six — faced a crisis. His business had recently failed. His savings were wiped out when, after insurance wouldn’t cover a rotting exterior wall in his home, he had paid nearly $20,000 to replace it. And he wasn’t sure how he was going to make his next house payment. Nolan said he went to the bishop of his Latter-day Saint ward, or congregation, for help. He knew that the church sometimes provides financial assistance to those in need, and — given his longtime devotion, including a two-year proselytizing mission and “significant” service positions in his ward — he thought he would find support there. Instead, Nolan said, the bishop reviewed his finances and authorized him to get $40 worth of food. That was it. Several months after this experience — during which time Nolan said he worked three jobs to scrape by — a by stockpiling surplus donations instead of using them for charitable works. Church leaders say the “rainy day” account is meant to guard against disasters or lean economic times — like credit crunches, stock slides and recessions — and to fund operations in poorer parts of the world where member donations cannot keep up. Nolan said learning that the church has billions of dollars but didn’t help in his time of need “literally felt like a punch to the face.” To process his emotions, Nolan turned to something that’s always been therapeutic for him: writing music. And after composing several songs, he realized a musical would be the perfect vehicle to share them. Starting conversations The show’s story follows four young professionals who are thrilled to land their dream jobs at Mormon Inc. However, “after discovering that their fellow church employees are quite obsessed with hoarding insane levels of stocks, land and other investments (while donating very, very little to external charities),” , “some of these new hires have a change of heart.” The music’s style is a mix of hip-hop, pop and rock. Songs like “