John Hinckley Jr. says he has ‘true remorse’ for shooting President Reagan, hurting others

6/28/2022 7:45:00 PM

John Hinckley Jr. says he has ‘true remorse’ for shooting President Reagan, hurting others

@Topstories, Ronald-Reagan

John Hinckley Jr. says he has ‘true remorse’ for shooting President Reagan, hurting others

Hinckley was 25 and suffering from acute psychosis when his gunshots wounded Reagan and three others

. It also wounded a police officer and a Secret Service agent.This YouTube video still shows John Hinckley Jr. performing a cover of Elvis Presley's "Don't Be Cruel."Hinckley told Major Garrett, CBS News’ chief Washington correspondent, that he’s glad he didn’t succeed. He said that at the time of the shooting he did “not have a good heart” and was doing things “a good person doesn’t do.”

Jurors found Hinckley not guilty by reason of insanity, and he spent decades at a mental hospital in Washington.“I was not just a cold, calculating criminal in 1981,” he said. “I truly believe I had a serious mental illness that was preventing me from knowing right from wrong back then.”

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Hinckley says he's sorry for shooting that wounded ReaganThe man who shot and wounded President Ronald Reagan in 1981 has apologized for his actions in a televised interview.

Hinckley says he’s sorry for shooting that wounded Reagan and othersJohn Hinckley Jr., who was freed from all court oversight earlier this month, said that he felt remorse for all the lives his actions affected.

John Hinckley, Jr., who attempted to assassinate Ronald Reagan, says, 'I have true remorse for what I did'CBS NEWS EXCLUSIVE: Hinckley said he has no recollection of what it felt like to pull the trigger and that it's 'something I don't want to remember.' Another CBS interview I'll miss.

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Hinckley says he’s sorry for shooting that wounded Reagan and othersJohn Hinckley Jr., who was freed from all court oversight earlier this month, said that he felt remorse for all the lives his actions affected.

Hinckley says he's sorry for shooting that wounded ReaganThe man who shot and wounded President Ronald Reagan in 1981 has apologized for his actions in a televised interview.

James Brady, who died in 2014 .WASHINGTON (AP) — John Hinckley Jr.freed from all court oversight earlier this month, told CBS Mornings in his first televised interview since his release that he felt remorse for all the lives his actions affected.John Hinckley, Jr.

It also wounded a police officer and a Secret Service agent. This YouTube video still shows John Hinckley Jr. "I have true remorse for what I did," he said. performing a cover of Elvis Presley's "Don't Be Cruel. “I know that they probably can’t forgive me now, but I just want them to know that I am sorry for what I did." Hinckley told Major Garrett, CBS News’ chief Washington correspondent, that he’s glad he didn’t succeed. said he doesn’t remember what he was feeling when he attacked the president and wounded three others. He said that at the time of the shooting he did “not have a good heart” and was doing things “a good person doesn’t do. "I have true remorse for what I did.

” Jurors found Hinckley not guilty by reason of insanity, and he spent decades at a mental hospital in Washington. said he wishes he could take it all back. “It’s such another lifetime ago. “I was not just a cold, calculating criminal in 1981,” he said. “I truly believe I had a serious mental illness that was preventing me from knowing right from wrong back then." Hinckley Jr.” Hinckley began making visits to his parents’ home in Williamsburg, Virginia, in the early 2000s.” Hinckley was 25 and suffering from acute psychosis when his gunshots wounded Reagan and three others outside a Washington hotel. A 2016 court order granted him permission to live with his mother full time, albeit under various restrictions, after experts said his mental illness had been in remission for decades. He spent more than 30 years at St. On March 30, 1981, Hinckley, then 25, brought a .

He signed a lease on a one-bedroom apartment in the Williamsburg area last year and has been living alone there with his cat, according to court documents. His mother died in July.C. Hinckley told Major Garrett, CBS News’ chief Washington correspondent, that he’s glad he didn’t succeed. He’s also been releasing songs online and looking for a venue willing to let him sing and play guitar before a live audience. Hinckley had previously been under restrictions that barred him from owning a gun, using drugs or alcohol or contacting members of the victims’ families. “He got one shot off and then my father started to hit him, hitting him in the back of the head,” said Dominic Antenucci, Alfred's son, in an interview with News 5 last year. But a federal judge in Washington had said months ago that he would free Hinckley from those restrictions if he remained mentally stable. “I was not just a cold, calculating criminal in 1981,” he said. Hinckley was judged mentally unfit to stand trial and spent more than 30 years at St.

Those restrictions were lifted on June 15. President Reagan addressed Antenucci’s death during his weekly radio address on the shooting’s fourth anniversary. Tuesday’s apology was not Hinckley’s first. His attorney Barry Levine said during a court hearing last year that Hinckley wanted to express his “heartfelt” apologies and “profound regret” to the people he shot and their families as well as to actress Jodie Foster, who he was obsessed with at the time of the shooting, and to the American people. “Mr. A 2016 court order granted him permission to live with his mother full time, albeit under various restrictions, after experts said his mental illness had been in remission for decades. As Hinckley expressed his regrets on Tuesday, he said he hopes to soften the public’s perception of him. “I’m just trying to show people I’m kind of an ordinary guy who’s just trying to get along like everybody else,” he said. He was a proud American who never asked a thing of others, but who willingly risked his own life to save another.C.

But he doesn’t expect to see forgiveness from his victims, saying: “I really don’t think that the Brady family or the Reagan family or Jodie Foster – I don’t think they want to hear from me. He’s also been releasing songs and looking for a venue willing to let him sing and play guitar before a live audience.” “I feel terrible for what I did,” he said. “If I could take it all back, I would. I swear — I would take it all back. But a.” Note to readers: if you purchase something through one of our affiliate links we may earn a commission. "Psychologically, that person is dead," Hinckley said of his younger self.

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