How to Make a Queen’s Park Swizzle, the Mojito’s Brooding But Delicious Cousin

It’s rum, lime and mint, but oh so different.

Cocktail Recipe, Cocktails

1/28/2022 6:02:00 AM

Think of it as the Mojito's more rebellious cousin.

It’s rum, lime and mint, but oh so different.

8-10 mint leavesAdd mint leaves to a tall glass. Add simple syrup and gently muddle mint into the syrup. Add crushed ice two-thirds or so full and agitate (either swizzle back and forth with a swizzle stick or a barspoon, or else just stir) until the glass begins to frost. Add crushed ice to fill and decorate the top with two to three dashes of Angostura Bitters. Garnish with a mint sprig and serve with a straw.

NOTES ON INGREDIENTSPhoto: courtesy El DoradoRum:What rum to use varies pretty wildly, even among experts. Occasionally someone will call for using white rum, which is good but honestly too much like a Mojito. Most everyone, including the earliest available recipes, call for aged rum, and usually from Guyana or Jamaica or both.

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0.75 oz demerara syrup 8-10 mint leaves Add mint leaves to a tall glass. Add simple syrup and gently muddle mint into the syrup. Add crushed ice two-thirds or so full and agitate (either swizzle back and forth with a swizzle stick or a barspoon, or else just stir) until the glass begins to frost. Add crushed ice to fill and decorate the top with two to three dashes of Angostura Bitters. Garnish with a mint sprig and serve with a straw. NOTES ON INGREDIENTS Photo: courtesy El Dorado Rum: What rum to use varies pretty wildly, even among experts. Occasionally someone will call for using white rum, which is good but honestly too much like a Mojito. Most everyone, including the earliest available recipes, call for aged rum, and usually from Guyana or Jamaica or both. My go-to choice here is the so-called “Demerara” rum from Guyana—flagship bottles here are the El Dorado 8 Year , or the Hamilton’s 86 Demerara Rum. Jamaican Rum is good, but the funkiness, for me, draws too much attention without contributing to the whole, like a basketball player who refuses to pass. Another good choice are the light Spanish-style rums which will double down on the vanilla depth, like the Don Q Reserva, or Angostura’s own 5 or 7 year rums. And as far as quantity is concerned, many of the original recipes call for 3 oz. (Bergeron’s “doozer of a rum drink”) which is 50% too much. I’ve brought it down to standard levels. Demerara Syrup: This drink is at its best when it gets texture and depth from the syrup as well as the rum. This comes from making a simple syrup with less-refined sugar—demerara or turbinado or “Sugar in the Raw,” it’s sometimes called—as opposed to white sugar. If all you have is white sugar you can still make the drink, but Demerara Syrup will add a bit more to the final product. Either way, combine equal parts sugar and hot water, and stir to dissolve. Keep in the fridge and the syrup should last a month or so. Bitters : Angostura Bitters are from Trinidad, where the Queen’s Park Hotel was located, and are classic here. They’re also ubiquitous and amazing, and there’s very little reason to make this with anything else. I’ll only note that some very talented people, like the Death & Co. cocktail book, choose to append the Angostura float with a dash of Peychaud’s Bitters. While it certainly doesn’t hurt (it clashed with Jamaican Rum, but you shouldn’t be using that anyway), the only time I thought it actually helped was when the rum was especially vanilla-forward, as with Bacardi’s 8 or something like Zaya Gran Reserva. Ice: Aside from the Mint Julep, I can’t think of a drink in the classic cocktail canon that so needs crushed ice. To “swizzle” requires it. The flavors all work if you shake it like a normal Mojito or something, but it’s really worth investing the effort to crush some ice: Either buy a bag at your local Ice Company (or Sonic Drive-In, which sells bags for cheap), hammer it yourself with a , pulse it in the blender, wrap it in a tea towel and smash it with a rolling pin, whatever. Crushed ice will dilute quickly, which we want, and helps the bitters stay on top for the presentation. Layering: Like all layered drinks, you can choose your own plan of attack—you can sip from the top, which is mostly bitters, or sip from the straw, which is no bitters. Personally, after doing one of each just to see what it’s like, I prefer to mix it all together. It’s worth layering just for the look, but once served, the cocktail is at it’s best when you get a bit of everything. Related Stories