How the Pentagon learned to start worrying and investigate UFOs

#TBT: 'How the Pentagon learned to start worrying and investigate UFOs'

Tbt, Ufo

1/27/2022 4:17:00 PM

TBT : 'How the Pentagon learned to start worrying and investigate UFO s'

The government’s UFO report has landed: It concludes that strange aircraft have been haunting U.S. warships for years, marking a new era for “unidentified aerial phenomena.”

But no one in the intelligence community uses the term UFO anymore. The new moniker is Unidentified Aerial Phenomenon, or UAP—a name change meant to signal that the U.S. government is taking the mysterious sightings seriously.0:25Even without answers, the report is a welcome validation for those in the military who witnessed unknown objects in the sky. “We were ridiculed and mocked by so many, so now it feels nice to have people ask good questions and to have them really be interested in getting to the bottom of it,” says Alex Dietrich, a former Navy pilot who observed a UAP in 2004. “Then, of course, there’s that underlying sense of urgency that we all have: Is this a threat to national security?”

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tyhenrymedium Natgeo covering UAPs is interesting to say the least. Until I get 100% proof. Like a actual real shot down UFO or a real Alien 👽 I will not believe. In todays world with the tech in everyone’s pocket. We should have proof if aliens were real. ufotwitter CognitiveHumanInterface nftJustLife

tyhenrymedium Ooo. Haunting U.S. warships for years? Gotta read this! What UFOs? PostDisclosure Never needed to Worry but study for sure. One day the truth will be revealed to all. Meanwhile, most Skeptics would remain skeptic. PostDisclosure When the Navy and Lou and Mellon let the cat out of the bag. Then the report admitting “they” DOD ain’t got a clue

California bill would ban single-use smoking products like cigarette filtersSupporters of the bill said cigarette butts and vape pods cost millions per year in cleanup and pollute the environment. Smugglers here we come ... Anyone getting a black market going yet? Or an I going to ha people can roll their own and go filterless ... for all we know there could be chemicals in those cig filters which cause complications...

Investigate what!!!! The US Government has never admitted that they are the ones creating and testing stupid flying objects…. Remember Area 51? Well, it all started there…. There is no way this is real.there must be some explanation to this :-) Eye roll 'hehe, flying metal pizza' We would love further investigative journalism on the topic.

The biggest story in human history. Thank you for having the courage to ignore the stigma and report what's going on. What BS, why do I have to subscribe to read your articles, you can keep them I'll read them elsewhere I'm sure. It's a speck of dirt on the camera lens. big brother is watching you👽

Seattle University returning to in-person classes next weekSeattle University is returning to in-person classes next week after starting the year with remote learning.

We’ve learn how to handle aliens from hollywood, no worry all is good. Even though several sightings are found. It's not proven, that doesn't mean there are none. I always wondered what is behind those black holes🧐 Please. This has been going on since the beginning of man. I hope before I die I learn why they’ve lied to us about them

'They' could ignate nukes. Oh god I hope it's the Vulcans. They are out there... watching us 👽

T-Mobile readying new incentive for Home Internet customersStarting January 27, T-Mobile will start offering Home Internet for free for 15 days.

Keyboardist Don Airey on His Years With Ozzy Osbourne, Deep Purple, and Black SabbathThe heavy-metal veteran has also played with Judas Priest, Jethro Tull, Rainbow, UFO , Whitesnake, and Bruce Dickinson

Gun Deaths Rise As Biden’s Reform Agenda StallsSome advocates worry the president’s window for aggressive gun control measures is closing. It was sadly never open. The republicans will never allow gun control. There will ALWAYS be a “window” for GunControl How about control these f*cking criminals and stop all this bail reform and light sentencing of people. Leave me and my guns alone.

Crime concerns behind neighborhood's idea to secede from AtlantaConcerns that crime is going unchecked have inspired a group of neighbors to form the Buckhead City Committee. They want the community to vote on removing themselves from the city of Atlanta, and starting their own city, with their own police force. Helping 5 people pay for their bills and groceries,if you need help with your bills send me a DM This is a LIE. The people behind this don't live in Buckhead!! Follow the money and hate. Almost like defunding the police is a bad idea. Who could have predicted that? 🤔 🤦🏿‍♂️

, a landmark sign that this previously fringe topic has gained mainstream acceptance. And while the report, produced by the office of the Director of National Intelligence (DNI),   does provide some new information about the inexplicable occurrences, it leaves many of the biggest questions unanswered. Yes, Navy pilots and other military personnel have been seeing mysterious flying objects for decades; a Navy task force reviewed 144 sightings by U.S. government personnel that occurred between 2004 and 2021. No, the Pentagon doesn’t know what they are. There’s no evidence that the objects were sent by space aliens, but the report, mandated by Congress as part of the 2021 National Intelligence Authorization Act, confirms that the sightings remain “unidentified.” But no one in the intelligence community uses the term UFO anymore. The new moniker is Unidentified Aerial Phenomenon, or UAP—a name change meant to signal that the U.S. government is taking the mysterious sightings seriously. The report, which includes a classified section available only to lawmakers, details the results of investigations by the Defense Department’s UAP Task Force, established in 2017. Strange flying objects with seemingly bizarre aerodynamic abilities have been spotted by pilots, on radar, and with infrared sensors. The report does state that the UAP Task Force was not able to attribute any of the sightings to American military or other advanced U.S. government technology. “Some UAP observations could be attributable to developments and classified programs by U.S. entities,” the report says. “We were unable to confirm, however, that these systems accounted for any of the UAP reports we collected.” The most famous UAP encounters in modern aviation history—cases from 2004, 2014, and 2015 that involve pilot sightings, radar tracking, and objects caught on video—remain unsolved. 0:25 U.S. Navy aviators encountered an unidentified flying object, nicknamed “Go-Fast,” over the Atlantic coast of Florida in 2015. Recorded on an F/A-18 fighter jet's gun-mounted infrared camera, the object appears to zip across the surface of the ocean as witnesses cry out in amazement over the radio. Department of Defense The UAP Task Force considered conventional explanations for the sightings, such as natural atmospheric phenomena, misidentified civilian aircraft, and radar malfunction—but except for one report that they attributed to a deflating balloon, the investigators “currently lack sufficient information in our dataset to attribute incidents to specific explanations.” The uncertainty leaves stranger and more disturbing theories to be considered, such as “foreign adversary systems” and what the report refers to as “a catchall ‘other’ bin.” Even without answers, the report is a welcome validation for those in the military who witnessed unknown objects in the sky. “We were ridiculed and mocked by so many, so now it feels nice to have people ask good questions and to have them really be interested in getting to the bottom of it,” says Alex Dietrich, a former Navy pilot who observed a UAP in 2004. “Then, of course, there’s that underlying sense of urgency that we all have: Is this a threat to national security?” A number of U.S. officials are now posing that same question. What Dietrich saw in the sky 16 years ago started a series of events that changed the discussion about unidentified aerial sightings forever.       An encounter at sea On November 14, 2004, Lieutenant Junior Grade Dietrich was pushed back into the cockpit seat of her F/A-18 Super Hornet as it sped 150 miles per hour toward the edge of the flight deck of the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Nimitz . The g-forces increased as she applied the afterburners and roared away from the ship to begin a day of routine, pre-deployment training off the coast of California, near Catalina Island. Just after leaving the deck of the Nimitz , she observed an oblong object hovering over the water. It suddenly leaped into motion, skimming 500 to 1,000 feet over the waves at around 500 knots (575 mph). The fighter jet’s onboard radar couldn’t detect the object, but Dietrich’s weapons systems operator (WSO)   in the rear seat—whose name is not public—saw it too, crying out over the radio. “We were trying to call out what we are seeing to each other, and to make sure everybody else is seeing it,” recalls Dietrich, who was a new pilot back in 2004, only completing flight training in March 2003. “It’s moving so erratically and so fast that our voices, our minds, and then our radio calls can’t keep up with it.” “I got to see it during the night and during the day. And it definitely was a glowing object." By Gary Voorhis Former Navy officer and radar technician aboard the U.S.S. Princeton. Military pilots are particularly adept at what aviation folks call “reece,” short for reconnaissance, and referring more specifically in this case to the art of recognizing aircraft by their shapes, paint schemes, unit insignia, and so on. “We train our eyes and our minds to make those split-second categorizations,” Dietrich says. “We saw that there was a vehicle; there was a vessel there. Then almost immediately: That is not any vehicle or vessel I recognize.” Other Super Hornets launched behind Dietrich, one with pilot Cmdr. David Fravor and WSO Lt. Cmdr. Jim Slaight on board, and another piloted by Lt. Cmdr. Chad Underwood and an unidentified aviator. Warned that something was out there, Underwood managed to capture the craft on a forward looking infrared camera. It was 40 feet long, round and smooth, and quickly received the nickname “Tic-Tac.” What Dietrich didn’t know at the time was that unexplained objects had been detected on radar in that same airspace for days. Gary Voorhis, a Petty Officer 3rd Class on the U.S.S. Princeton guided missile cruiser, a ship training with the Nimitz , began to see things appear on his radar screens on November 10, four days before Dietrich’s flight. Voorhis, with six years in the Navy at the time, was the technician responsible for two of the Princeton’s combat systems, and what he was seeing was impossible. In just seconds, an object had dropped to the waterline from 60,000 feet, hovered, and then zipped away at high velocity. It made right angle turns that were confounding. “Before it was reported even to the Captain, those systems were triple checked,” Voorhis says. “And then once it was taken up with the Captain, they were triple checked again. Everything was working perfect, which made it even creepier.” The strange objects returned over several days. Voorhis made it a point to look with his own eyes, asking watch officers for radar information so he could know where to aim his binoculars. “I was able to see it on the horizon,” he recalls. “I got to see it during the night and during the day. And it definitely was a glowing object. Could I tell you for 100 percent certainty it was exactly what we were tracking? No, but I was just looking at the bearing and elevation, and it was exactly where it was supposed to be.” Despite the radar evidence, when Dietrich and her WSO reported what they saw, it received little attention from superiors and opened the two naval aviators to jokes about space aliens. Owner Judy Messoline built the UFO Watchtower in 2000 near Hooper, Colorado, after people in the area claimed to have seen many unexplained events. Photograph by Ken Geiger Please be respectful of copyright. Unauthorized use is prohibited. “When I came back and we were being ridiculed and dismissed by the crew, I said to myself … well then, they know what it is,” Dietrich says. “It must be some sort of blue [United States or allied] system. It must be some sort of highly classified, compartmentalized system, and we were inadvertently vectored into its test range.” If so, she was angry to be ordered into cluttered airspace with no warning. Before any flight, pilots are briefed on every environmental nuance, from the air humidity to bird sightings. Dietrich now knows that radar operators like Voorhis tracked odd returns for days, and the Navy leadership launched her training flights anyway, with no mention of the anomalies. The inability to address the mysterious objects—“there’s no box on the checklist for UFOs,” Dietrich says—left her unprepared for the encounter and put her at risk of a collision. “UAP clearly pose a safety of flight issue and may pose a challenge to U.S. national security,” the report states, confirming “11 reports of documented instances in which pilots reported near misses with a UAP.” “Look at that thing, dude!”  The sighting receded in importance   as Dietrich’s career progressed. She served in Iraq and Afghanistan, logging more than 1,250 hours and 375 carrier landings during combat missions. She then worked several well-placed administrative jobs with the Navy in Washington, D.C., while pursuing an MBA from the George Washington University School of Business, which she received in 2014. But the ripple effects of the sighting never really went away. Officials in the Pentagon repeatedly asked her to brief people who wanted to hear her story firsthand. Since 2004, Dietrich has been requested to deliver briefings at least once a year and usually more, often enough that it became a nuisance. “It was a total pain in the ass,” she says. “Then it started with the Hill: Can you come brief these senators and congressman? McCain's office is interested in this. How do you say no to John McCain?” During presidential turnovers, Pentagon officials even asked her to brief the new administrations, speaking with senior-level naval intelligence officials, both civilian and military. "There’s no box on the checklist for UFOs.” By Alex Dietrich Retired lieutenant commander and former F/A-18 pilot in the U.S. Navy. Interest in the sightings waxed and waned but definitively spiked in late 2014 and early 2015, when Super Hornets attached to the U.S.S.  Roosevelt