'How Can I Convince Someone to Go to Therapy?'

You can’t force someone to change but you can let them know help is available.

1/22/2022 6:01:00 PM

No one can force a loved one to see a therapist. But by providing support and information instead of judgment, they can help someone decide if it's right for them. Here's how.

You can’t force someone to change but you can let them know help is available.

Key pointsApproach the conversation from a place of care and concern. Avoid making judgments about the person’s behavior.Couples can use the “carrot-and-stick” approach—stating the benefits of seeking therapy and the drawbacks of not seeking therapy.Individual therapy likely won’t be effective if the person doesn’t want to change. People have to make the decision to accept help on their own.

Source: Rocketclips, Inc./ShutterstockSeeing a loved one struggle with their mental health can feel scary and overwhelming. It’s natural to want to help by bringing in a professional, but while some people are open totherapy, many others are hesitant or resistant. Here’s how to broach this sensitive question with purpose, care, and respect.

Read more: Psychology Today »

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I think the main factor is cost. Who's paying for it and is it worth it. Otherwise, you got nothing to lose in going.

Find a therapist near me Key points Approach the conversation from a place of care and concern. Avoid making judgments about the person’s behavior. Couples can use the “carrot-and-stick” approach—stating the benefits of seeking therapy and the drawbacks of not seeking therapy. Individual therapy likely won’t be effective if the person doesn’t want to change. People have to make the decision to accept help on their own. Source: Rocketclips, Inc./Shutterstock Seeing a loved one struggle with their mental health can feel scary and overwhelming. It’s natural to want to help by bringing in a professional, but while some people are open to therapy , many others are hesitant or resistant. Here’s how to broach this sensitive question with purpose, care, and respect. Note: This advice pertains to people who are generally stable and not in immediate crisis. If you are concerned for someone’s safety, call 911 or go to the hospital. 1. Choose the right time. Pick a time when the person is likely to be receptive. For example, don’t pounce as soon as they wake up or walk in after work. Make sure that you have ample time and a place to speak privately. You can also ask about timing directly, for example, “I have something I’d like to discuss with you. When would be a good time?” 2. Approach the conversation with care and concern, not judgment. When you broach the topic of therapy, begin by expressing that you want to help because you care about the other person. Ask questions and listen to the person’s answers carefully and patiently. Listen for ways that therapy could address specific concerns. Affirm that you’re raising the topic because you want them to be healthy and happy. When explaining specific concerns, be descriptive about what you’ve observed and how you think therapy would help, explains psychologist You could say something along these lines: “I’ve noticed that for the last several months, you’ve appeared to be really sad based on X behavior, and I think therapy could be beneficial for Y reasons.” Avoid coming from a place of or judgment, both in tone and content. An angry stance, for example, might take the form of stating that the other person has made life hard for you or how they should have been working on their problems themselves. 3. For couples therapy, take the carrot-and-stick approach. Often, one partner leads the charge for couples therapy and must convince the other to come along, says