How a 29-year-old YouTube millionaire making up to $220,000 a month spends his money

11/22/2019 10:39:00 AM

How a 29-year-old YouTube millionaire making up to $220,000 a month spends his money. (via @CNBCMakeIt)

Wealth, Generation Y

How a 29-year-old YouTube millionaire making up to $220,000 a month spends his money. (via CNBCMakeIt)

Graham Stephan is on track to earn a minimum of $1.6 million in 2019, but could bring home closer to $2 million. He started his career in real estate but, today, the majority of his income comes from making YouTube videos.

Stephan estimates that 85% of his total yearly earnings come from YouTube. Still, he treats it like "bonus income" and hasn't spent any of it. "If YouTube were to vanish tomorrow, I would be disappointed," he says, but from a money perspective, "it's never been something that I've relied on."

TeachableCNBC Make ItRenting space has never been challenging, he says: "In L.A., there's such a shortage of housing. Finding tenants has been so easy."Even after he started seeing success, he lived with his dad to save money. After five years of living at home and saving all of his commission money, he had enough in the bank to buy his first property, which he still owns and rents out today. He moved into his own place in his early 20s and continued to work his way up in the real estate industry, eventually selling between $12 and $20 million worth of real estate a year, "which would translate to about $250,000 to $500,000 a year in gross commissions," he says. That's roughly what he was making before his YouTube channel took off.

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MakeIt Yes but his income from being a realtor before and during is not chump change. MakeIt Hilarious on the right! MakeIt GPStephan They are posting about you MakeIt Stop posting this dumb story over and over again MakeIt 350 for food for the whole month is entirely not true in absolutely anyway MakeIt So what? This pertains to no one beyond the 0.001%. Crap journalism.

MakeIt Literally no one cares. MakeIt On Apple products? MakeIt Yeah. This is fair

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, has over 1 million subscribers and focuses on his experiences in the real estate industry.During police interviews, she said she feared the brothers would grow up to abuse women, as she had been.November 20, 2019 3:55 PM Facebook The 29-year-old was walking her own dogs, when she encountered a hunting pack."Mad Money" host said.

It's earned him, on average, $81,428 a month in 2019, though the most he's made in one month from the channel is $136,330. He launched a second channel, The Graham Stephan Show , in May 2019. 47-year-old Joseph Pilkington, also pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of sexual imposition, for having sex with Brittany when she was underage. It has over 200,000 subscribers, covers a variety of money and business topics and has brought in, on average, $9,256 per month in 2019, though he's currently earning closer to $24,000 per month from this channel. Investigators do not know which of the animals were responsible for killing; 93 dogs are being tested, including five of her own, as part of a manslaughter investigation. Stephan estimates that 85% of his total yearly earnings come from YouTube. He then impregnated her in 2009, when she was 17. Still, he treats it like "bonus income" and hasn't spent any of it. Robinhood reached a tipping point in asset gathering that the incumbents, like Schwab and TD Ameritrade, had to respond to by abandoning commissions ," he said.

"If YouTube were to vanish tomorrow, I would be disappointed," he says, but from a money perspective, "it's never been something that I've relied on. Each time Brittany killed a child, she waited for her husband to come home from work to find him. He then made his way to a ravine, but was forced to move away after he too encountered a pack of around 30 dogs." Teachable: $28,837/month Stephan sells two online courses: "The Real Estate Agent Academy," which focuses on how to get started in the industry, and "The YouTube Creator Academy," which helps people grow their YouTube channel and turn it into a business. The classes, which he started selling in early 2018, earn him nearly $30,000 a month. Niall was the first to die, in July 2014. "Since it's all online, that's pretty much all profit," says Stephan, who pays $90 a month to use the platform Teachable . "There's almost no overhead whatsoever.. The possible Schwab-TD Ameritrade deal would create a brokerage worth more than $5 trillion in total assets.

" That said, creating them was "quite the ordeal," he admits. "'The Real Estate Agent Academy' took me nearly a year to make. That involved speaking with over a dozen real estate agents about their careers, what they wished they learned, what they wanted to improve on ...

filming each segment, editing and then putting it together in such a way that the user wouldn't have any questions whatsoever." Stephan became a millionaire at age 26 CNBC Make It Rental income: $15,105/month Stephan owns and rents out six properties in Los Angeles, including the duplex he lives in. Three of the properties are paid off, and he is paying down mortgages on the other three. Although Stephan brings in $15,105 from his tenants, after factoring in expenses, which include mortgages, property taxes and insurance, he earns about $5,000 a month in profit. Renting space has never been challenging, he says: "In L.

A., there's such a shortage of housing. Finding tenants has been so easy." Real estate commissions: $8,572/month Stephan's career started in real estate. "I got into it as soon as I turned 18 because I had no other options," he says.

"I didn't get into college and I saw getting my real estate license as a way to get one year of work experience and then reapply to schools. But it turned out to be a career I really loved." He didn't earn a lot at first — "It was like $500 or $600 commissions every few weeks," he says — despite working 10 to 12 hour days, six to seven days a week. "I didn't sell my first house until about nine to 10 months into working full time, but once I sold my first, that gave me the confidence that I could actually do it." Even after he started seeing success, he lived with his dad to save money.

After five years of living at home and saving all of his commission money, he had enough in the bank to buy his first property, which he still owns and rents out today. He moved into his own place in his early 20s and continued to work his way up in the real estate industry, eventually selling between $12 and $20 million worth of real estate a year, "which would translate to about $250,000 to $500,000 a year in gross commissions," he says. That's roughly what he was making before his YouTube channel took off. Despite his success on YouTube, Stephan still sells real estate CNBC Make It Stephan still works as a realtor associate for The Oppenheim Group, a brokerage that sells luxury property across L.A.

He doesn't spend nearly as much time as he used to selling properties, though. "At this point, it feels like I'm doing YouTube full-time just because of how much time I spend on it. It's become such a profitable endeavor that it's not worth it to me anymore to show properties, unless it's a really good client or a repeat business that I want to help sustain." Still, he brings in an average of $8,572 in commissions per month. Affiliates and sponsors: $7,222/month Partnerships with various companies earn Stephan an average of $7,222 per month.

"Generally, there's a contract signed between myself and the sponsor outlining the details of the expectations," he explains. "Typically, it's a 45-90 second mention in the first minute of the video." What he spends Here's a breakdown of how much Stephan spends in a typical month. Mortgage: $2,872 Stephan lives in a duplex in Mid-City Los Angeles that he bought in June 2017. It's a house divided into two separate apartments and includes a parking space and a garage, where he films his YouTube videos.

His monthly mortgage payment is $2,872, but he rents out the other half of the property: "Between the equity I get [from renting] and the tax write-offs from using the garage as my office, it basically works out to be a free place for me to live." He counts property taxes ($535) and insurance ($135) as business expenses. Transportation: $632 Stephan's car payment runs $632 a month. He bought a Tesla Model 3, which start at $35,000, in April 2019 — but, in a way, Stephan argues, the car was free. He made a YouTube video about the purchase that ended up going viral, he says, and the video itself "paid for the entirety of the car.

" There's a reason he decided to finance the car rather than pay for it in cash: "It makes financial sense to keep the loan: It's for six years at 3.75% interest — and I know I would make more money by not paying down that loan and, instead, investing in real estate and getting a higher return somewhere else." Food: $350 Stephan spends about $200 a month on groceries. He price shops at Trader Joe's, Ralphs and Smart & Final: "I'll make the rounds and stock up on whichever item is the cheapest at which store." His simple palate helps keep his bill down, he adds: "You'll see in the fridge, it's eggs, oatmeal, ham, cheese, bananas and then some frozen foods.

" And he doesn't mind repeating meals: "I eat the same thing for breakfast that I have for 10 years: two eggs with ham and cheese, and half a bagel with the generic brand cream cheese." Stephan spends another $150 on restaurants. He loves all-you-can-eat sushi, which he splits with his girlfriend, and his guilty pleasure, McDonald's. "That's my treat," he says of his trips to the golden arches. He only indulges after finishing all of his work.

"I will purposely use that as an incentive to get all my work done. … So, yes, I guess you could say I will work for McDonald's." Stephan and his girlfriend split meals to save money CNBC Make It Insurance: $340 "I have the cheapest health plan," says Stephan, who pays $215 a month and doesn't have vision or dental insurance. He pays $125 a month for car insurance. Gym: $220 "My gym membership is absolutely, ridiculously way too expensive," says Stephan, who pays $220 a month to work out at Equinox.

But it's convenient, he adds: "It's right down the street from my office at The Oppenheim Group." Credit card annual fees: $129 Stephan has 12 credit cards: nine for personal use and three for business. Four of them are rewards cards that come with annual fees. He pays a total of $1,545 in fees per year, or about $129 a month. "I definitely get value from them because of the signup bonus that I get, the points I get back and the perks with the cards," he says.

Everything else: $551 .