He Was Hospitalized for COVID-19. Then Hospitalized Again. And Again.

12/31/2020 2:30:00 AM

He was hospitalized for COVID-19. Then hospitalized again. And again.

İntensive Care, Covıd

He was hospitalized for COVID -19. Then hospitalized again. And again.

The routine things in Chris Long's life used to include biking 30 miles three times a week and taking courses toward a Ph.D. in eight-week sessions.But since getting sick with the coronavirus in March, Long, 54, has fallen into a distressing new cycle -- one that so far has landed him in the hospital seven times.Periodically since his initial five-day hospitalization, his lungs begin filling again; he starts coughing uncontrollably and runs a low fever. Roughly 18 days later, he spews up greenish-yellow fluid, signaling yet another bout of pneumonia.Sign up for The Morning newsletter from the New York TimesSoon, his oxygen levels drop and his heart rate accelerates to compensate, sending him to a hospital near his home in Clarkston, Michigan , for several days, sometimes in intensive care .'This will never go away,' he said, describing his worst fear. 'This will be my going-forward for the foreseeable future.'Nearly a year into the pandemic, it's clear that recovering from COVID -19's initial onslaught can be an arduous, uneven journey. Now, studies reveal that a significant subset of patients are having to return to hospitals, sometimes repeatedly, with complications triggered by the disease or by the body's efforts to defeat the virus.Even as vaccines give hope for stopping the spread of the virus, the surge of new cases portends repeated hospitalizations for more patients, taxing medical resources and turning some people's path to recovery into a Sisyphean odyssey that upends their lives.'It's an urgent medical and public health question,' said Dr. Girish Nadkarni, an assistant professor of medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, who, with another assistant professor, Dr. Anuradha Lala, is studying readmissions of COVID -19 patients.Data on rehospitalizations of coronavirus patients are incomplete, but early studies suggest that in the United States alone, tens of thousands or even hundreds of thousands could ultimately return to the hospital.A study by the Cen

But since getting sick with the coronavirus in March, Long, 54, has fallen into a distressing new cycle — one that so far has landed him in the hospital seven times.“This will never go away,” he said, describing his worst fear. “This will be my going-forward for the foreseeable future.”

Data on rehospitalizations of coronavirus patients are incomplete, but early studies suggest that in the United States alone, tens of thousands or even hundreds of thousands could ultimately return to the hospital.And in a report on 1,250 patients discharged from 38 Michigan hospitals from mid-March to July, 15% were rehospitalized within 60 days.

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Laced_Apple Maybe he should practice a bit more cleanliness. I have to remind grown ass adults to wash their hands after using the bathroom, it's sad. I hate acting like a 'Karen' but at the same time I can't have everyone out of work, sick, because they hate soap.

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Pam Belluck December 30, 2020, 2:01 PM Chris Long, who has landed in the hospital seven times after contracting Covid-19, in Clarkston, Mich.Email Shutterstock While 2020 — the year of So.versions) and Full Frontal With Samantha Bee.Most cyberattacks start with email and social engineering attacks.

, Nov. 24, 2020. Cooking. (Emily Rose Bennett/The New York Times) The routine things in Chris Long’s life used to include biking 30 miles three times a week and taking courses toward a Ph. Two Distant Strangers would have been powerful regardless of when it premiered, but the timing of its April 9 Netflix debut turned out to be both perfect and awful.D. Among Eater editors, shelter-in-place got us into our home kitchens like never before and, naturally, we’ve depended on some recipes more than others to keep us going, rediscovering old favorites and finding new gems. in eight-week sessions. Enigmatic screen star Yaphet Kotto has died at the age of 81.

But since getting sick with the coronavirus in March, Long, 54, has fallen into a distressing new cycle — one that so far has landed him in the hospital seven times. Meatballs were both fun to make and wildly practical; we could always count on noodles; we finally figured out what to do when we had too many greens in the fridge; and we made time for baking projects.” Vanity Fair : Your film is a fictional take on the tragic, seemingly endless loop of Black Americans being killed by police. Periodically since his initial five-day hospitalization, his lungs begin filling again; he starts coughing uncontrollably and runs a low fever. Roughly 18 days later, he spews up greenish-yellow fluid, signaling yet another bout of pneumonia. Its virtues are numerous: among other things, it’s pantry-staple-simple, highly flavorful, and an excellent way to use up leftover cooked rice. Sign up for The Morning newsletter from the New York Times Soon, his oxygen levels drop and his heart rate accelerates to compensate, sending him to a hospital near his home in Clarkston, Michigan, for several days, sometimes in intensive care.R. “This will never go away,” he said, describing his worst fear. Plus, it’s essentially a ginger delivery vehicle, which is always a good thing.” The Duchess is said to have complained that no member of the Royal Family had yet contacted her directly, despite claims that she received no help when feeling suicidal and that a family member had raised “concerns” about the colour of their son’s skin.

“This will be my going-forward for the foreseeable future.” Nearly a year into the pandemic, it’s clear that recovering from COVID-19’s initial onslaught can be an arduous, uneven journey. This iconic tomato sauce from Italian culinary legend Marcella Hazan is so ridiculously easy that it almost feels like a scam. I genuinely could not believe, when Martin said it. Now, studies reveal that a significant subset of patients are having to return to hospitals, sometimes repeatedly, with complications triggered by the disease or by the body’s efforts to defeat the virus. Even as vaccines give hope for stopping the spread of the virus, the surge of new cases portends repeated hospitalizations for more patients, taxing medical resources and turning some people’s path to recovery into a Sisyphean odyssey that upends their lives. Sometimes I throw in a few anchovy filets or whole cloves of garlic if I’m feeling fancy. “It’s an urgent medical and public health question,” said Dr. Again.

Girish Nadkarni, an assistant professor of medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, who, with another assistant professor, Dr. (I got that tip from Queer Eye ’s Antoni Porowski’s Instagram and maintain that it is likely the only good cooking advice ever given by that man. Anuradha Lala, is studying readmissions of COVID-19 patients. Data on rehospitalizations of coronavirus patients are incomplete, but early studies suggest that in the United States alone, tens of thousands or even hundreds of thousands could ultimately return to the hospital. It works because it’s less of a hard recipe and more of a set of guidelines. Thinking about all the names—George and Breonna and all the other names you see on signs—I was thinking about how you internalize the emotions each time one of those stories happens. Story continues A study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of 106,543 coronavirus patients initially hospitalized between March and July found that 1 in 11 was readmitted within two months of being discharged, with 1.6% of patients readmitted more than once. I used mustard greens, kale, and chard in place of dandelion greens when I had them.

In another study of 1,775 coronavirus patients discharged from 132 VA hospitals in the pandemic’s early months, nearly a fifth were rehospitalized within 60 days. It just feels like the worst version of Groundhog Day . More than 22% of them needed intensive care, and 7% required ventilators. Use literally whatever you have in this vague order, and add spices if you want. And in a report on 1,250 patients discharged from 38 Michigan hospitals from mid-March to July, 15% were rehospitalized within 60 days. Recurring admissions don’t just involve patients who were severely ill the first time around. — Jaya Saxena, staff writer Chocolate babka : The first time I baked this recipe, which makes two loaves of intensely chocolaty babka, I fully intended to keep one for my immediate family and give one away — until I saw my fiancée and parents ravenously devour the first loaf. It felt like I was exorcising something. “Even if they had a very mild course, at least one-third have significant symptomology two to three months out,” said Dr.

Eleftherios Mylonakis, chief of infectious diseases at Brown University’s Warren Alpert Medical School and Lifespan hospitals, who co-wrote another report.A. “There is a wave of readmissions that is building, because at some point these people will say ‘I’m not well. We both felt they were different enough that it wasn’t an issue between us.’” Many who are rehospitalized were vulnerable to serious symptoms because they were over 65 or had chronic conditions.” The babka is a lot like my 2020: arduous, messy, a chance to support loved ones, and full of chocolate. But some younger and previously healthy people have returned to hospitals, too. When Becca Meyer, 31, of Paw Paw, Michigan, contracted the coronavirus in early March, she initially stayed home, nursing symptoms such as difficulty breathing, chest pain, fever, extreme fatigue and hallucinations that included visions of being attacked by a sponge in the shower. My first forays into the kitchen, I felt a little bit like a weak baby bird, so I wanted something easy to make and comforting. They’re such great actors, and it felt so real.

Meyer, a mother of four, eventually was hospitalized for a week in March and again in April. She was readmitted for an infection in August and for severe nausea in September, according to medical records, which labeled her condition “long haul COVID-19. Just boil the pasta, cook the pancetta, beat the eggs until they’re super foamy, and combine everything over a low flame until you have a thick, creamy sauce.” Because she couldn’t hold down food, doctors discharged her with a nasal feeding tube connected to protein-and-electrolyte formula on a pole, which, she said, “I’m supposed to be attached to 20 hours a day. And there’s a point where Carter’s girlfriend suggests that he try talking to Murphy, reaching out to him.” Feeding tube issues required hospitalization for nearly three weeks in October and a week in December. — Erin Russell, Eater Austin associate editor. She has been unable to resume her job in customer service, spent the summer using a walker, and has had a home health nurse for weeks.

“It’s been a roller coaster since March and I’m now in the downswing of it, where I’m back to being in bed all the time and not being able to eat much, coughing a lot more, having more chest pain,” she said. We’ve seen stories of people who were part of community policing programs—and still got killed by the cops in that community! The core of the story is deadly serious, but there’s humor and playfulness in the movie too. Readmissions strain hospital resources, and returning patients may be exposed to new infections or develop muscle atrophy from being bedridden. Long and Meyer said they contracted the bacterial infection C. difficile during rehospitalizations. Daunte Wright is going to the car wash, and all of a sudden the police lights come on. “Readmissions have been associated, even before COVID, with worse patient outcomes,” Mylonakis said.

Some research suggests implications for hospitals currently overwhelmed with cases. A Mount Sinai Hospital study of New York’s first wave found that patients with shorter initial stays and those not sick enough for intensive care were more likely to return within two weeks. I think it’s a lazy criticism in a lot of ways. Lala, who co-wrote the study, said the thinking at overstretched hospitals was “we have a lack of resources, so if the patients are stable get them home.” But, she added, “the fact that length of stay was indeed shorter for those patients who return is begging the question of: Were we kicking these people out the door too soon?” Many rehospitalized patients have respiratory problems, but some have blood clots, heart trouble, sepsis, gastrointestinal symptoms or other issues, doctors report. Some have neurological symptoms like brain fog, “a clear cognitive issue that is evident when they get readmitted,” said Dr. But to ignore the reality of how we got to this point would be cinematic malpractice.

Vineet Chopra, chief of hospital medicine at the University of Michigan, who co-wrote the Michigan study. “It is there, and it is real.” Dr. Why? The last statement that Carter makes, I want you to feel like you want to be on his team. Laurie Jacobs, chairwoman of internal medicine at Hackensack University Medical Center, said causes of readmissions vary. “Sometimes there’s a lot of push to get patients out of the hospital, and they want to get out of the hospital and sometimes they’re not ready,” so they return, she said.

But some appropriately discharged patients develop additional problems or return to hospitals because they lack affordable outpatient care.” Did you consider ending it much darker? Absolutely. Long’s ordeal began on March 9. “I couldn’t stand up without falling over,” he said. His primary physician, Dr. Do you always work fast? No, but for this one, my Daily Show education definitely came into play—knowing how to run a team and do rewrites lightning fast. Benjamin Diaczok, immediately told him to call an ambulance.

“I crawled out to the front door,” recalled Long. He was barefoot and remembers sticking out his arm to prop open the door for the ambulance crew, who found him facedown. We knew we wanted to and needed to make the movie as soon as possible, but it was crazy to start filming in the middle of what would normally be awards season and then have it fall into line with that same season. He awoke three days later, in the hospital, when he accidentally pulled out the tubes to the ventilator he had been hooked up to. After two more days, he had stabilized enough to return to the apartment where he lives alone, an hour north of Detroit. Long had some previous health issues, including blood clots in his lungs and legs several years ago and an irregular heartbeat requiring an implanted heart monitor in 2018. That turned out okay.

Still, before COVID-19, he was “very high-functioning, very energetic,” Diaczok said. Now, Long said: “I’ve got scarred lungs, pulmonary fibrosis, and I’m running right around 75-80% lung capacity.” He was rehospitalized in April, May, June, July, August and September, requiring oxygen and intravenous antibiotics, potassium and magnesium. “Something must have happened to his lungs that is making them more prone for this,” Diaczok said. Long, a former consultant on tank systems for the military, is also experiencing brain fog that has forced a hiatus from classes toward a Ph.

D. in business convergence strategy. “I read 10 pages in one of my textbooks and then five minutes later, after a phone call, I can’t remember what I read,” he said. “It’s horrible,” Diaczok said. “This is a man that thinks for a living, and he can’t do his job.

” And his heart arrhythmia, controlled since 2018, has resurfaced. Unless Long, who is 6-foot-7, sleeps at an incline on his couch, his heart skips beats, causing his monitor to prompt middle-of-the-night calls from his doctor’s office. Unable to lie in bed, “I don’t sleep through the night.” Small exertions — “just to stand up to go do the dishes” — are exhausting. In July, he tried starting physical therapy but was told he wasn’t ready.

In August, he got up too fast, fell and “I was very confused,” he recalled. During that hospital readmission, doctors noted “altered mental status” from dehydration and treated him for pneumonia and functional lung collapse. In late October, Long developed pneumonia again, but under Diaczok’s guidance, managed at home with antibiotics. In December, when a pulmonologist administered a breathing test, “I couldn’t make it six seconds,” he said. Long repeatedly measures his temperature and pulse oxygen, and can feel in his chest when “trouble’s coming,” he said.

Determined to recover, he tries to walk short distances. “Can I make it to take out the trash?” he’ll ask himself. On a good day, he’ll walk 8 feet to his mailbox. “I’m going to be around to walk my daughters down the aisle and see my grandkids,” said Long, voice cracking. “I’m not going to let this thing win.

” This article originally appeared in .