From Windrush to fuel shortages: A short history of migrants in Britain

10/3/2021 6:00:00 PM

A shortage of lorry drivers left petrol stations dry across the country. At the heart of it is its fraught relationship with migration.

Migration, Uk Migration

With a shortage of truck drivers playing a major role in the ongoing fuel supply chain crisis, we look at the recent history of economic migration to Britain

A shortage of lorry drivers left petrol stations dry across the country. At the heart of it is its fraught relationship with migration.

“The Act’s aim … was to try and retain access to the labour power of its colonies and former colonies,” Becky Taylor, professor of history at the University of East Anglia, tells TRT World.Pollsin its embrace of mass migration. The speech was so divisive that many would later blame it for some of the violence that flared in later years. 

“These three Acts sought to use non-racialised mechanisms to achieve racial ends,” professor Taylor explains.Just the following year, 60,000 Asians living in war-torn Uganda, a former British colony, were given 90 days to leave the country.1992: the Maastricht Treaty and free movement

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This situation is a good reply to all those anti-immigration morons.

UK extends truck driver visa program as fuel crisis persistsThe British government has extended an emergency visa program for truck drivers as fuel shortages frustrate motorists lining up at empty pumps. 6 months will change everything. 🙄

UK extends truck driver visa program as fuel crisis persistsThe British government has extended an emergency visa program for truck drivers as fuel shortages frustrate motorists lining up at empty pumps. horrible British may not have gas but certainly have freedom from EU 😉 Surely due to the horrific terorist attack in Nice by a crazed lorry driver. Aiming for baby strollers even.

Increasing energy prices pushes Britain into fuel povertyThe UK’s energy regulator increased the energy price cap affecting 15 million households across the country. GogMagog depleting Worlds resources at the expense of Believers.

UK army to deliver petrol from Monday amid fuel crisisBritain will deploy almost 200 military tanker personnel, 100 of whom are drivers, from Monday to assist with fuel deliveries to gas stations and help address a shortage of heavy goods vehicle drivers, the government says.

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Short of workers and in need to rebuild its ailing economy after World War II, Britain would take in more than 300,000 people from the region over the next 20 years, as well as hundreds of thousands more from elsewhere in the former British Empire, particularly Bangladesh, India and Pakistan.Email this article The Associated Press An employee cleans fuel pumps at a closed petrol station in London, Thursday, Sept.Email this article The Associated Press An employee cleans fuel pumps at a closed petrol station in London, Thursday, Sept.Britain's energy regulator Ofgem announced the energy price cap will increase for 15 million customers who do not have fixed-price contracts due to the record cost of wholesale gas.

  The British Nationality Act 1948 had given British citizenship to all residents of the Commonwealth. They worked in manufacturing and construction, as well as public transport and the National Health Service. Many gas stations around Britain have shut down in the past five days after running out of fuel, a situation exacerbated by panic buying among some motorists. Everyone who wasn’t a Commonwealth citizen faced entry restrictions to Britain based on income and health status, unless they were entering under a specific labour scheme. Long lines of vehicles formed at pumps that were still open, blocking roads and causing traffic chaos.  “The Act’s aim … was to try and retain access to the labour power of its colonies and former colonies,” Becky Taylor, professor of history at the University of East Anglia, tells TRT World. Some drivers have had to endure hourslong waits to fill up. Right wing conservative politician Enoch Powell speaks at Islington Town Hall. The ongoing energy crisis could force one in five British households into fuel poverty, according to the charity’s latest calculations .

(Hulton-Deutsch Collection/Corbis / Getty Images) 1960s: ‘Rivers of blood’ By the mid-1960s, concerns over migration from the Caribbean and South Asia had begun to grow. In an announcement late Friday, the Conservative government said temporary visas for nearly 5,000 foreign truck drivers it hopes to recruit would run into 2022 instead of expiring on Christmas Eve as originally planned. In an announcement late Friday, the Conservative government said temporary visas for nearly 5,000 foreign truck drivers it hopes to recruit would run until the end of February instead of expire on Christmas Eve as originally planned. Polls conducted in the second half of the decade showed that more than half of Britons thought migration from former Commonwealth nations had harmed the country.  Tensions peaked when Conservative MP Enoch Powell made what became known infamously as his “rivers of blood” speech in 1968, claiming the country had gone literally mad in its embrace of mass migration. The government said 300 fuel drivers would be able to come to the U. The speech was so divisive that many would later blame it for some of the violence that flared in later years.K.  Powell had quoted a line from Virgil’s Aeneid that said, "as I look ahead, I am filled with foreboding; like the Roman, I seem to see 'the River Tiber foaming with much blood'. from overseas “immediately” and stay through March. On the other hand, Ofgem recommends customers shopping around or asking their supplier to put them on a better deal in order to avoid the price increase.

"  Irish presence, which by that point counted just under a million, was much less prominent in the British public’s imagination of migration. Race relations in Britain were at their most strained, and migration policy shifted accordingly. In another move intended to ease the pressure at Britain's pumps, around 200 military personnel, including 100 drivers, will be deployed beginning Monday to help to relieve fuel supply shortages that have caused empty pumps and long lines at filling stations. In another move intended to ease the pressure at the pumps, around 200 military personnel, including 100 drivers, will be deployed from Monday to help to relieve fuel supply shortages that have caused empty pumps and long lines at filling stations. In 1962, the Commonwealth Immigrants Act de-facto stripped the vast majority of Commonwealth citizens of the automatic right to enter the country by introducing immigration controls for anyone whose passport hadn’t been issued in the UK or Ireland. It was the first of three laws that would serve, eventually, to strip citizens of the former colonies of their citizenship rights. “U. “These three Acts sought to use non-racialised mechanisms to achieve racial ends,” professor Taylor explains.K. Source: TRT World.

The last of these three laws was the Immigration Act of 1971, which decreed Commonwealth migrants did not have any more rights than those from other parts of the world, effectively marking the end of the Windrush era. forecourt stock levels are trending up, deliveries of fuel to forecourts are above normal levels, and fuel demand is stabilizing," Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng said.  Ugandan Asians fleeing to the UK after their expulsion in 1972 (Getty Images) 1972 and the Ugandan-Asian crisis: from citizen to refugee Just the following year, 60,000 Asians living in war-torn Uganda, a former British colony, were given 90 days to leave the country.  Many were from South Asian countries including India and Pakistan, and were British passport holders who had been in the country for generations.K.K. Some were the descendents of labourers brought from the other end of the British Empire to build the Ugandan railway.    were resettled to the UK as refugees, joining between 150,000 and 200,000 other East Africans Asians who had come to the country in the previous decade.” However, the Petrol Retailers Association, which represents independent filling stations, warned that fuel supplies remain a problem and could be getting worse in places.

  1992: the Maastricht Treaty and free movement In 1992, the UK alongside 11 other European countries signed the Maastricht Treaty, which sanctioned the birth of the European Union announcing a new stage in the process of European integration and introduced free movement, granting all EU citizens the right to live and work without restrictions in any member state. “In London and the southeast, and possibly parts of eastern England, if anything, it had got worse," the group's chairman, Brian Madderson, told BBC radio.   In the following decade, tens of thousands of EU citizens moved to Britain, and the other way around. Madderson welcomed the deployment of military drivers next week but warned it would have a limited impact.   Meanwhile, the only way for non-Europeans to come to the UK was through the asylum route. After the fall of the Berlin wall, applications for asylum and by the end of the 90s – with conflicts flaring in Sri Lanka and Iran/Iraq – they had reached more than 70,000 a year. “It’s a large help, but in terms of the volume, they are not going to be able to carry that much. “It’s a large help, but in terms of the volume, they are not going to be able to carry that much. A Polish delicatessen is seen in Hammersmith, West London, in 2016.

(Neil Hall / Reuters) The New Labour decade: open doors and prison cells 1997 marked the beginning of Tony Blair’s New Labour decade, widely associated with its “open door” immigration policy – although some critics would argue against the word choice. In recent months, many companies have reported shortages, including fast-food chains KFC, McDonald’s and Nando’s. Restrictions on immigration were generally relaxed to issue more work and study permits, attracting international students and expanding low and high-skilled migrant worker schemes. Supermarket shelves have also looked barren, and fears have grown that they will not be stocked as usual in the run-up to Christmas. Blair unconditionally embraced globalisation, which migration was seen as an integral part of, believing the only “rational response” to it was “manage it, prepare for it and roll with it. In an attempt to stave off a shortage of Christmas turkeys, the government also announced that 5,500 foreign poultry workers will be allowed into the U.” Underpinning Blair’s policies was the idea of “ managed migration .” A new points-based system was introduced in 2005. beginning in late October and can stay until the end of the year. from late October and to stay until the end of the year.

When the EU expanded east in 2004, the UK was the only country to allow immediate right to work to new EU citizens, resulting in one of the largest migration flows since WWII. In the years that followed, Polish became the second most widely-spoken language in the UK. However, when the country left the economic orbit of the EU at the start of this year, one of the bloc’s main tenets ceased to apply — the freedom of people to move within the EU to find work. But in 1998, the Blair administration also published a white paper called “Fairer, faster, firmer”, resulting in an expansion of Britain’s immigration detention facilities, where undocumented migrants and asylum seekers are sometimes detained for months, even years in a few cases. With Brexit , many tens of thousands of drivers left the U. ‘A really hostile environment’ “In the UK illegally? Go home or face arrest.K.” These were the words emblazoned on billboard vans seen driving up and down the country in 2013, as part of a campaign by the Home Office, which was then led by future Conservative prime minister Theresa May.

  During her tenure, May introduced a set of legislative and administrative changes with the aim to create, in her own words, “a really hostile environment for illegal immigrants. The coronavirus pandemic has exacerbated the problem, prompting thousands of EU drivers to return to their home countries. The coronavirus pandemic has exacerbated the problem, prompting thousands of EU drivers to return to their home countries." As a result, landlords and medical professionals would be required to check people’s immigration status.  Critics have long argued that these measures – still in place today - have pushed undocumented migrants underground and prevented them from accessing basic services for fear of being reported.K. Even more shockingly, they led to the children of former Commonwealth citizens who came to the UK as the “Windrush generation” being detained and deported.'s series of lockdowns also led to difficulties in training and testing new domestic drivers to replace those who left. Never formally naturalised as citizens after travelling with their parents, they had become undocumented in their own country. In addition, the pandemic accelerated the number of British truck drivers choosing to retire.

As the Home Office had destroyed their landing cards, they had no way to prove their right to live in the UK. A Pro-Brexit protester talks with anti-Brexit protesters in London. ——— Follow all AP stories on post-Brexit developments at https://apnews.. (Henry Nicholls / Reuters) Poster-boy for Brexit Hostility towards migration had reached toxic levels by the early 2010s, a consequence of the global economic crisis and the rise of the UK Independence Party. Its leader, Nigel Farage, had succeeded in making anti-migrant and xenophobic rhetoric more palatable to wider sectors of the populace by blaming “unskilled” migrants for driving down wages. ———. Hardline views on migration from other EU countries reached their apogee in 2014, when the UK was required to lift transitional immigration controls for citizens of Romania and Bulgaria, which had joined the now 28-member EU bloc in 2007.

On the day restrictions to work in Britain were lifted on January 1, a contingent of journalists and politicians showed up at Luton airport and besieged the first low-cost flight from Romania arriving there shortly after midnight. The British public made the acquaintance of the first Romanian to land in the UK, a 30-year-old whose wish, he told journalists, was to “work, earn money and go home”. In the weeks that followed, he was pestered by the media to the point that he had to quit his job in a car wash. He became the poster boy of EU migration to the UK. By then, the idea that economic migrants could have “good intentions,” as suggested by the Pathe journalist who had met the Windrush passengers upon arrival over 60 years earlier, did noy fly with a vast swathe of the public.

A good of it believed the only reason migrants were heading to the UK was to take advantage of its welfare system. In June 2016, 52 percent of the British public voted to leave the European Union. A worker guides cars into the forecourt as vehicles queue to refill at a fuel station in London on September 30, 2021. (Hannah McKay / Reuters) “We can think of Brexit as the coming to fruition of decades of a public and political debate that positioned migration as a ‘problem’ that needed to be solved; and a problem that could only be solved by ‘taking back control’,” Professor Taylor said. And while the rhetoric of the high-skilled against the low-skilled worker has served to saw the seeds of division, it is perhaps one of the HGV drivers, an Englishman from Sussex interviewed by British daily The Guardian that puts its best: “I’m always staggered by how much truck drivers have been taken for granted in the UK.

We work so hard for very little money.” Source: TRT World .