Ex-Brexit secretary invokes Neville Chamberlain in calling for Boris Johnson to resign

'In the name of God, go!'

Parliament Of The United Kingdom, Brexit

1/19/2022 6:56:00 PM

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson could be ousted from power within the week after former Brexit secretary and longtime ally David Davis compared him to Neville Chamberlain in a stunning rebuke today.

'In the name of God, go!'

Driving the news:Johnson is under immense pressure from the public and his own Conservative Party over allegations that he lied about lockdown-breaking parties in his Downing Street home.His position is growing more tenuous by the hour; dozens of Conservative MPs have called for him to resign, creeping close to the 15% minimum needed to trigger a vote of no confidence.

Moments before Johnson entered Parliament to face the debate on Wednesday, a Conservative MP elected in 2019 dramatically crossed the floor to join the opposition Labour Party.Then came the intervention from David Davis, who served as Brexit Secretary from 2016 to 2018.

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Boris Johnson should have been ousted long ago

Boris Johnson Risks Facing Vote of No-Confidence - Impact on GBP/USDUK politics have been stealing the limelight in recent weeks following revelations that the UK government had been flaunting lockdown restrictions on various occasions over the last two years. Get your market update from JMcQueenFX here:

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‘In the Name of God, Go’: Boris Johnson Told to Resign Over Boozy Lockdown PartiesOne of the British PM’s most well-known colleagues confronted him face-to-face Wednesday.

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Boris Johnson, adversaries nervously await ‘partygate’ reportThe British prime minister and his staff are accused of attending parties on government property while the nation was under coronavirus restrictions in 2020 and 2021.

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson could be ousted from power within the week, after a longtime ally compared him to Neville Chamberlain in a stunning rebuke in the House of Commons on Wednesday. Driving the news: Johnson is under immense pressure from the public and his own Conservative Party over allegations that he lied about lockdown-breaking parties in his Downing Street home. His position is growing more tenuous by the hour; dozens of Conservative MPs have called for him to resign, creeping close to the 15% minimum needed to trigger a vote of no confidence. Moments before Johnson entered Parliament to face the debate on Wednesday, a Conservative MP elected in 2019 dramatically crossed the floor to join the opposition Labour Party. Then came the intervention from David Davis, who served as Brexit Secretary from 2016 to 2018. What they're saying: "I expect my leaders to shoulder the responsibility for the actions they take. Yesterday he did the opposite of that. So, I will remind him of a quotation which may be familiar to his ear: Leopold Amery to Neville Chamberlain," Davis teed off from the back-benches: "You have sat there too long for all the good that you have done. In the name of God, go." Why it matters: If Johnson is forced to resign in the coming days, Davis's speech will likely be viewed as the catalyst for his downfall. He is the most senior Conservative member of Parliament (MP) to demand Johnson step down, intensifying a rebellion initially sparked by lawmakers elected during the 2019 election that swept Johnson into Downing Street. Davis was first elected to Parliament in 1987, when Margaret Thatcher was still prime minister, and ardently supported Johnson throughout his campaign to deliver Brexit — Johnson's signature achievement, and the main reason he had commanded the support of his party throughout multiple scandals. Flashback: Leopold Amery's use of the quote — which was invoked for the first time by Oliver Cromwell in 1653 — came during the Norway Debate in 1940, when the then-pro-appeasement Prime Minister Chamberlain was under fire for the trajectory of Britain's war against Hitler. Chamberlain resigned days later, paving the way for Winston Churchill to become prime minister. Johnson, who wrote a biography of Churchill, responded implausibly to Davis's broadside: "I must say to him, I don’t know what he is talking about." What to watch: Johnson has deferred all questions on the parties to an ongoing independent investigation by a civil servant, the results of which could be published any day now. If the findings are as damaging as many expect, it could unleash a flood of new calls for his resignation. Go deeper