Do Birth Control Pills Affect Your Mood? Scientists Can’t Agree

6/22/2022 2:10:00 PM

Over 100 million women are estimated to use oral contraceptives, but studies on the pill’s mental health effects raise more questions than answers.

Science, Health

Over 100 million women are estimated to use oral contraceptives, but studies on the pill’s mental health effects raise more questions than answers.

Over 100 million women are estimated to use oral contraceptives, but studies on the pill’s mental health effects raise more questions than answers.

The Journal of Sex ResearchThe most famous research on the topic is aThe study made“That was a well-done study for what’s possible with observational data,” says Ruben Arslan, a personality psychologist at the University of Leipzig in Germany. Note the term “observational”—the biggest drawback of the study is a classic tale of “correlation, not causation.” They found a

undiagnosed and untreatedSuch trials take a lot of effort. Only a handful have been done on this subject, about six or seven in total, and they’re spread over the six or so decades the medication has been available, says Graham. The glaring gap is due to a number of factors: a lack of funding for women’s health research, fears that such research could be viewed as “pill-bashing,” and that many people in the field, Graham says, simply throw their hands up and say the matter is too difficult or too subjective—or too trivial—to study. “For me, that’s not a reason not to study it,” she says.

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Going on or off BC turns me into a psycho rage-case for 2-3 months. I feel like i don't even know myself until things even back out. Yes. Enjoying sex without the risk of pregnancy makes many people happy—a psychological effect Aspect fallouts are spotting or bleeding between periods (this is more common with progestin-only pills), sore breasts, nausea, or headaches. But these usually go away after 2 or 3 months, and they don't happen to everyone who takes the pill. Birth control shouldn't make U ☝️

Save the research funds and just ask people who take them -- YES The whole 'feigning ignorance' thing when it has anything to do with a woman's health or well being, has gotten stale. This can't still be a serious debate. Even after years of study, Have you tried, um, ...ASKING SOMEONE? Of course they do. The hormones they are designed to manipulate effect and affect mood. Are we really this dumb, people?

I was on them for many years to control my chaotic & painful cycle & I can say they had an effect on my mood. I briefly stopped taking them & the difference was incredible but I had to go back on them sadly. I wish I knew the alternatives back then because I regret using them. Spoiler alert, I don't take them anymore because they do

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number one reason women choose to go off the pill.My baby’s rare condition left her unable to breathe — but she won’t give up An Indian boy is being described as “made of glass” due to a rare condition in which his bones break at the slightest touch.The Microsoft co-founder joked that ‘expensive digital images of monkeys’ would improve the world Related Video: The rise of play-to-earn videogames – in which gamers trade NFTs – offers a glimpse into how the metaverse could attract users with monetary rewards, and what pushbacks may come with it.breaking record daily highs in several cities.

But we don’t yet have a clear answer on whether the link between the pill and mood is real. The biggest problem is that most studies to date have been cross-sectional in design, meaning they involve taking a group of women who are using the pill and comparing them to a group who aren’t using it. However, the Uttar Pradesh resident’s condition is so severe that his bones can shatter at the slightest touch, according to Jam Press. “It doesn’t take into account that women who tried the pill and had negative mood effects or sexuality negative effects would come off it,” says Cynthia Graham, a professor in sexual and reproductive health at the University of Southampton and editor-in-chief of The Journal of Sex Research . The 66-year-old billionaire was referring to the notion that overvalued assets will keep going up because there are enough people willing to pay high prices for them. “That, to me, is one big reason why it’s difficult to answer the question. In addition, Rohit’s osteoporosis has severely stunted his growth to the point that he stands 1-foot, 4-inches tall and weighs about 32 pounds.” This is called the survival bias, or healthy-user bias. But this number is expected to increase throughout the week as the heat continues to build across the northern Plains, Midwest and Gulf Coast on Monday, potentially bringing triple-digit temperature records as it progresses into the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic on Tuesday.

Plus, studying whether a drug causes conditions like depression and suicidality are just plain tricky. Jam Press/Rare Shot News Rohit is in constant pain due to his condition. Extraneous factors like socioeconomic background, relationship status, a family history of mental illness diagnose all muddy any conclusions drawn. The most famous research on the topic is a Danish study from 2016, led by Charlotte Wessel Skovlund, which followed over 1 million women between the ages of 15 and 34 for over 14 years, using registry data. Meanwhile, Rohit’s sister is teaching him to read, as he can’t attend school due to his condition. It reported that women aged between 15 and 19 taking oral contraceptives were about 80 percent more likely than women who weren’t to be diagnosed with depression or prescribed antidepressants. Participants who were taking progesterone-only contraception were twice as likely to be depressed, the study found. There is currently no cure for osteoporosis, although sufferers can mitigate the symptoms by taking calcium supplements and medications that promote bone growth,. Hundreds of thousands of people, including , had to endure excessive heat wave temperatures without electricity due to the outages.

The study made headlines , and women reported feeling vindicated and believed about their experiences with the medication. And it wasn’t just for people who took the pill—other long-term contraceptive methods like hormonal implants, patches, and intrauterine devices also appeared to have a negative effect on mood. But the study is not the hard-and-fast ending to the saga. “That was a well-done study for what’s possible with observational data,” says Ruben Arslan, a personality psychologist at the University of Leipzig in Germany. Note the term “observational”—the biggest drawback of the study is a classic tale of “correlation, not causation. Environmental Protection Agency .

” They found a link between contraception and depression, but not definitive proof that one was causing the other. The study authors did control for certain factors that could confound the results; they excluded women who had received a depression diagnosis prior to the study, and women who were pregnant or who had given birth in the last six months to control for postpartum depression. To screen for depression, the study used a depression diagnosis or antidepressant prescription as indicators, but many cases of depression go undiagnosed and untreated . As is true with all scientific queries, the best way to answer them is through a randomized placebo-controlled trial—the gold standard of research. Instead of observing how the pill behaves out in the world—where all sorts of other factors could be at play—with this type of study you’d create two highly similar sets of participants, and give one group the pill and the other a placebo, without indicating who has received what.

You can then be much more confident that any differences between the groups are caused by the pill and not some other factor. Such trials take a lot of effort. Only a handful have been done on this subject, about six or seven in total, and they’re spread over the six or so decades the medication has been available, says Graham. The glaring gap is due to a number of factors: a lack of funding for women’s health research, fears that such research could be viewed as “pill-bashing,” and that many people in the field, Graham says, simply throw their hands up and say the matter is too difficult or too subjective—or too trivial—to study. “For me, that’s not a reason not to study it,” she says.

“I’m a little uneasy about how much the Skovlund studies got covered, and how little coverage the randomized controlled trials got,” says Arslan. The most recent, a 2017 study from researchers in Sweden, took 340 women aged between 18 and 35 and gave one group the combined pill and the other a placebo, and followed them for three months. They found that while the pill caused a general decrease in quality of life, there was no increase in depressive symptoms. “This is some of the best evidence we have,” he says. “I think the reason they weren’t so big in the media is because the effects don’t lend themselves to some grand narrative.

” If either side proves to be correct, an injustice has been done. On one hand, people have been prescribed medication that can trigger or exacerbate mental illness with potentially insufficient warning or research into how damaging this could be. On the other, it means that women may have forgone effective contraception based on unfounded fears. The true answer probably falls somewhere in the middle. It’s clear that some women experience negative emotional side effects; the problem is we have no way of predicting who will, says Graham.

“I think we have enough evidence, for sure, over all the years since the pill was first approved, that there are some women who react negatively in terms of their mood.” But what we don’t have, she says, is really good research studies that can say this is more likely for women who have a certain type of characteristic, or for a certain type of pill or a certain type of progesterone used. An ideal study for Graham would be a randomized controlled study that counted depression using both formal diagnoses of depression and a validated depression questionnaire. Arslan echoes the point that the experience varies from woman to woman. “A lot of women have more data that is relevant to their experience than any scientist can marshal—because we know the reality is heterogeneity,” he says.

“To get an answer that’s useful as advice for individual women, I think that’s really hard.” More Great WIRED Stories .