Dear Abby: The stories she tells are making people think badly of me

1/23/2022 12:02:00 PM

Maybe it’s because of her brain injury. Should I confront her?

Dear Abby: The stories she tells are making people think badly of me

Maybe it’s because of her brain injury. Should I confront her?

Recently she suffered a traumatic brain injury and, although she’s doing well, her “embellishments” have become worse. They have reached the point that other people are questioning me and my motives.I have not confronted her about it since her brain injury because I’m unsure if her behavior has worsened due to her health issues. Some of her personality traits have become amplified since the injury, and I don’t know if this is another one.

I don’t want to hurt our relationship if this is something that cannot be resolved because of her injury. Should I confront her, or remain quiet and maintain our relationship?COMPLICATED IN THE WESTDEAR COMPLICATED:If confronting your obviously troubled sibling would fix the situation, I’d advise you to do it. But her pattern is to blow up at you, accuse you of lying, not speak to you and not change her ways. Why you would want a “close relationship” with someone like this is mystifying, because the closer you are to her, the more ammunition she has to slander you.

Read more:
Mercury News »

Richmond K-9 Officer Seara Burton honored at funeral services

Richmond Police Officer Seara Brooke Burton was remembered by her family and hundreds of friends, community members and fellow law enforcement officers at her funeral Monday. Read more >>

Dear Abby: Heights of sibling’s tall tales grow after injuryDEAR ABBY: My sister and I have a close but complicated relationship. She has always embellished stories about me when she's talking to others, and most of the time they portray me in a bad light. I usually ignore them when they get back to me, because I choose to pick my battles with her.

Dear Abby: Boyfriend’s ‘chatty’ habit makes girlfriend jealousDEAR ABBY: I've been going out with this guy for a couple of months. The problem is, he has to ALWAYS talk to every woman he sees -- from a two-second conversation to a several-minute conversation. He doesn't even know 99% of them.

Dear Abby: Man’s history of sexual abuse hidden for yearsDEAR ABBY: During my teenage years, I was repeatedly raped by my brother. The emotional and physical damage has left my life broken. He is now in a long-term relationship. Should I tell his girlfriend about the abuse? When I confronted him about it years ago, he denied it. If you were his girlfriend, wouldn't YOU want to know? -- HOLDING A SECRET

Dear Abby: My wife is resisting my extravagant end-of-life planDon’t I deserve to enjoy the time I have left?

Olympic Hockey’s Abby Roque Wants More Indigenous People on the RinkAs the first Native American woman to represent usahockey at a WinterOlympics, abby_roque wants to do her part to make hockey more welcoming. Hear her story on the latest episode of MyNewFavoriteOlympian:

Netflix Has Developed an Immersive “Bridgerton” Experience, and Dear Readers, You’re InvitedHey Bridgerton fans, this ones for you! Netflix just dropped EIGHT NEW Season two sneak peek photos that we cant wait to show you!

Dear Abby: Should I give her the ring she wants, though I’m not sure I’ll marry her? Recently she suffered a traumatic brain injury and, although she’s doing well, her “embellishments” have become worse.Updated: Jan.Updated: Jan.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips.

They have reached the point that other people are questioning me and my motives. I have not confronted her about it since her brain injury because I’m unsure if her behavior has worsened due to her health issues.m. Some of her personality traits have become amplified since the injury, and I don’t know if this is another one. | Published: Jan. I don’t want to hurt our relationship if this is something that cannot be resolved because of her injury. 23, 2022, 4:00 a. Should I confront her, or remain quiet and maintain our relationship? COMPLICATED IN THE WEST DEAR COMPLICATED: If confronting your obviously troubled sibling would fix the situation, I’d advise you to do it. How can I convince her that I deserve this after having worked for 40 years, and that we should enjoy these savings for the period of time left for me on Earth? -- WANTS TO ENJOY LIFE NOW DEAR WANTS: I’m sure your diagnosis has been frightening for both you and your wife.

But her pattern is to blow up at you, accuse you of lying, not speak to you and not change her ways. By Abigail Van Buren DEAR ABBY: My sister and I have a close but complicated relationship. By Abigail Van Buren DEAR ABBY: I’ve been going out with this guy for a couple of months. Why you would want a “close relationship” with someone like this is mystifying, because the closer you are to her, the more ammunition she has to slander you. My advice is to distance yourself, and if you hear that she has been telling more lies about you, to give the person a sad smile and say, “You know, my poor sister has had a traumatic brain injury. I usually ignore them when they get back to me, because I choose to pick my battles with her.” Period. When we go to a store, I feel like I’m invisible. DEAR ABBY: I’m a 60-year-old man with an information technology background. I value our relationship too much to let it be permanent, so I’m the one who always breaks the ice and tries to resolve things. Usually, we place the goodies in a common area and let others know there’s food available and they’re welcome to it.

I have recently been offered paid commercial driver’s license training, which entails a good year of coast-to-coast driving. This pays a lot of money, but my mother is dead set against it, probably because it will mean I have less time to spend with her. Recently she suffered a traumatic brain injury and, although she’s doing well, her “embellishments” have become worse. I don’t want to break up with him. My brother lives two hours away and visits her perhaps monthly, whereas I visit twice a week. I have little desire to continue in IT, but I’m not ready to retire. I have not confronted her about it since her brain injury because I’m unsure if her behavior has worsened due to her health issues. I’m getting a lot of pushback here, including unrealistic suggestions for local employment. I wish I was the only girl for him. This is a lesson in politeness and consideration for others that children in grammar school usually learn.

How can I manage these conflicting pressures? CHOICES IN PENNSYLVANIA DEAR CHOICES: If the only thing keeping you from broadening your work experience by getting that commercial driver’s license is your mother’s objection because you won’t be able to visit her twice a week — and her health is good — it’s time to decide what would make more sense for your future. I don’t want to hurt our relationship if this is something that cannot be resolved because of her injury. Because her suggestions for local employment are unrealistic, this may be the time to start planning for your long-term financial future. Long-haul trucking may be your most realistic option at this point. But her pattern is to blow up at you, accuse you of lying, not speak to you and not change her ways. If he loved you, he would not be chatting up other women. Talk to your mother before you make your final decision, to make sure she has an adequate support system in place. Related Articles . My advice is to distance yourself, and if you hear that she has been telling more lies about you, to give the person a sad smile and say, “You know, my poor sister has had a traumatic brain injury. Contact Dear Abby at or P.