Coronavirus live updates: Rate of new infections doubling every 3 days in New York

Karson Yiu, Wuhan, Viruses, Coronavirus, China, Washington, D.C., District Of Columbia, World Health Organization, Pandemic

NO SCHOOL? NO PROBLEM: These students in Farmingdale, New Jersey, aren’t letting class closures stop them coming together to pledge allegiance to the flag.

Karson Yiu, Wuhan

3/24/2020

NO SCHOOL? NO PROBLEM: These students in Farmingdale, New Jersey, aren’t letting class closures stop them coming together to pledge allegiance to the flag.

Over 1.5 billion people across the globe -- more than one-fifth of the world's population -- have been ordered or urged to stay home amid the deadly coronavirus pandemic.

Tune into ABC at 1 p.m. ET and ABC News Live at 4 p.m. ET every weekday for special coverage of the novel coronavirus with the full ABC News team, including the latest news, context and analysis. 9:42 a.m.: Pandemic could cost airlines more than $250 billion American Airlines passenger planes crowd a runway at Tulsa International Airport where they are parked due to flight reductions because of the coronavirus pandemic, March 23, 2020, in Tulsa, Okla. American Airlines passenger planes crowd a runway at Tulsa International Airport where they are parked due to flight reductions because of the coronavirus pandemic, March 23, 2020, in Tulsa, Okla. Nick Oxford/Reuters The airline industry could take a hit of more than $250 billion as a result of the steep decline in demand and government travel restrictions amid the COVID-19 outbreak, according to the International Air Transport Association (IATA). On Monday the TSA screened 331,431 people. On that same day last year, the TSA screened 2,434,370 people. "Without immediate government relief measures, there will not be an industry left standing," IATA’s Director General and CEO Alexandre de Juniac warned. How to avoid panicking in coping with coronavirus outbreak 8:51 a.m.: Japan announces Tokyo Olympics will be postponed until 2021 Journalists take images of the illuminated Olympic Rings monument at Odaiba Marine Park as the Rainbow Bridge is illuminated in rainbow colors to mark half a year before the opening of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan, Jan. 24, 2020. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) on announced that the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games will be postponed to 2021 due to the ongoing coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic, on March 24, 2020. Journalists take images of the illuminated Olympic Rings monument at Odaiba Marine Park as the Rainbow Bridge is illuminated in rainbow colors to mark half a year before the opening of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan, Jan. 24, 2020. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) on announced that the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games will be postponed to 2021 due to the ongoing coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic, on March 24, 2020. Kimimasa Mayama/EPA via Shutterstock have agreed that the upcoming Tokyo Olympics"will be held by the summer of 2021," the prime minister's office announced Tuesday. "I proposed to postpone for about a year and president Bach responded with 100% agreement," Abe told reporters in Tokyo, referring to Thomas Bach, head of the International Olympic Committee. The Olympics were originally slated to kick off in Tokyo on July 24, but there has been mounting pressure for organizers to postpone or cancel them due to the coronavirus pandemic. The International Olympic Committee’s executive board on Sunday said it would assess the worldwide situation over the next four weeks and make a decision that could include the scenario of postponing the Games. The board, however, emphasized that it has no current plans to outright cancel the 2020 Summer Olympics as such a scenario"would not solve any of the problems or help anybody." 8:28 a.m.: Sen. Klobuchar says husband remains hospitalized on oxygen Sen. Amy Klobuchar, a Minnesota Democrat who recently dropped out of the 2020 presidential race, said her husband, John Bessler, remains hospitalized and on oxygen support after testing positive for the novel coronavirus. "The reason he was hospitalized is he had pneumonia. He was coughing up blood and his oxygen levels were dangerously low, so he's been there for a few days now," Klobuchar told ABC News in an interview Tuesday on"Good Morning America." "He got a test last Wednesday and we didn't get the results until yesterday," she added."That's the story of a lot of people, and I think one of the things I want to say is a lot of Americans have this and worse going on, and one of the hardest things about this disease is you can't go and visit your loved one. As much as I love being on your show, I would rather be there with him right now and I can't do that." Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) takes the stage with her husband John Bessler as a Democratic president candidate during a primary night event at the Grappone Conference Center in Concord, New Hampshire, on Feb. 11, 2020. Klobuchar announced on March 24, 2020, that her husband has been hospitalized after testing positive for the novel coronavirus. Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) takes the stage with her husband John Bessler as a Democratic president candidate during a primary night event at the Grappone Conference Center in Concord, New Hampshire, on Feb. 11, 2020. Klobuchar announced on March 24, 2020, that her husband has been hospitalized after testing positive for the novel coronavirus. Scott Eisen/Getty Images Klobuchar said her husband, who is 52, has no preexisting conditions and was"very healthy" prior to falling ill with the virus." "We don't know how he got it and no one around us got it," she added."As far as we know, he didn't infect anyone else." Klobuchar's said her husband began feeling sick with what felt like a cold about 12 days ago and immediately quarantined himself inside their apartment. Bessler stayed put until he started coughing up blood and was hospitalized, she said. Klobuchar said she hasn't been tested because she had not come into contact with her husband in the last 14 days and hasn't shown any symptoms. "Why would I get a test when other people who are getting sick aren't getting tests? That's how I approached it, I'm going to be treated like everyone else," she said."I think that's what everyone has to do right now." 7:44 a.m.: FEMA 'absolutely ready' to use Defense Production Act The Federal Emergency Management Administrator Peter Gaynor said Tuesday the agency is"absolutely ready" to use the Defense Production Act, as health care workers across the nation sound the alarm over dwindling supplies needed in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic. President Donald Trump signed an executive order last week invoking the 1950 wartime law, which requires private companies to prioritize any product orders from the federal government over others. But the government has apparently yet to make any orders for medical supplies, such as personal protective equipment. "We just want to be careful that we don't do anything to put it out of balance and counter some other positive efforts that we see," Gaynor told ABC News chief anchor George Stephanopoulos in an interview Tuesday on"Good Morning America." An ambulance sits outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., on March 23, 2020, as the Senate continues negotiations on an economic relief package in response to the coronavirus pandemic. An ambulance sits outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., on March 23, 2020, as the Senate continues negotiations on an economic relief package in response to the coronavirus pandemic. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images "We will use it, I have no doubt about it," Gaynor added."But right now we're focused on getting those critical items to those states most in need. What I say to all governors out there, if you find a source, go buy it. FEMA will reimburse you." Stephanopoulos argued that governors are actually calling on the federal government to use the Defense Production Act now because states are competing with each other for supplies. Gaynor said they are"ready to take action on all of that" but are also"trying to keep the system in balance." "We don't want the federal government scooping up everything," Gaynor added."We want to make sure that there's enough capacity that governors and mayors around the country can order on their own, so it's a delicate balance." Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator Peter Gaynor appears on "Good Morning America," March 24, 2020. Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator Peter Gaynor appears on "Good Morning America," March 24, 2020. ABC News "What the governors are saying is that the federal government should scoop it up and distribute it to the states," Stephanopoulos responded,"and by forcing them to compete with each other, it's driving the price and hurting their ability to get what they need." "We're trying to identify sources around the globe. If it's in China, we're ready to fly it back to the United States today," Gaynor said."Again, we're focused on making sure that those governors that are most critical in need, no matter where it comes from, the federal government or another source directly, we are enabling that today." 7:28 a.m.: Spain reports over 500 deaths in past 24 hours Local police stand guard outside an ice rink, which will be used as a morgue, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Madrid, Spain, March 24, 2020. Local police stand guard outside an ice rink, which will be used as a morgue, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Madrid, Spain, March 24, 2020. Juan Medina/Reuters Spain's health ministry on Tuesday reported 514 deaths from the novel coronavirus in the past 24 hours. The country's death toll from the COVID-19 virus is now at 2,696. Spain has the third-highest number of recorded deaths in the outbreak, following China and Italy. With nearly 40,000 diagnosed cases, Spain is behind the United States and Italy in the highest national total outside China. Among those infected in Spain include at least 5,400 health workers, officials said. 6:14 a.m.: US Senate on the cusp of a stimulus deal U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said they are"very close" to an agreement on a massive stimulus package to save the national economy from the detrimental impact of the coronavirus pandemic. After emerging from a series of late-night meetings on Capitol Hill, Mnuchin and Schumer told reporters around midnight that they hope to come to a final agreement on the nearly $2 trillion economic rescue package by Tuesday morning. "We expect to have an agreement tomorrow morning," Schumer said."We still have a few little differences, but neither one of us expect it will get in the way of a final agreement. Secretary Mnuchin called the president and he told them we were very, very close to the agreement." Schumer said the Senate will"hopefully" vote on the legislation Tuesday evening. U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin walks to a meeting with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (not pictured) during negotiations on a coronavirus economic relief package on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., March 23, 2020. U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin walks to a meeting with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (not pictured) during negotiations on a coronavirus economic relief package on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., March 23, 2020. Joshua Roberts/Reuters Mnuchin told reporters he had spoken with President Donald Trump a number of times, updating him on the progress. "Today we’ve been working incredibly hard, both sides have been working around the clock," Mnuchin said."There are still documents that are going to be reviewed tonight and turned around, there's still a couple of open issues, but I think we're very hopeful that this can be closed out tomorrow." What to know about the novel coronavirus: How it started and how to protect yourself: Read more: ABC News

WeSupportOurPM It’s getting worse. And Trump won’t help NY? He has lost his mind! It is the United States of America not NY Man I wish we could just put Cuomo in the WH while this crisis is going on. Unreal how refreshing it is to just see calm, normal dialogue. The country is starved for leadership! If the COVID-19 crisis has proven anything its that Governors make better Presidents than Senators would. Lets remember that in 2024 before we make all of them suspend their campaigns before the first primary debates coronavirus Cuomo

Are all 140,000 in need of hospital care or can they be quarantined at home? If they need the hospital, more makeshift hospitals need to be set up at schools, gyms, and the various places that are currently closed. Temporary workers could be hired to help, creating some jobs. Why don't we see mass sanitation efforts like this in the US?

NoahCRothman If they can do it, so can we.

Louisiana governor says his state has the fastest growth rate of coronavirus cases in the worldLouisiana has the fastest rate of growth rate of coronavirus cases in the world, the state's Gov. John Bel Edwards said during a news conference on Sunday, citing a University of Louisiana-Lafayette study. US president is opening the closed door against covid-19. I wonder what stance the Louisiana take. We might see head-on collision between the central government and state governments.

New York, New Jersey coronavirus 'attack rate' is 5 times higher than rest of US, top official saysNew York we have a problem. New York has higher testing capacity. And I bet that the “test rate” is 5 times higher as well.

How Instagram micro influencers make money from sponsored posts, rate - Business InsiderThe CEO of an influencer marketing agency shares how much 'micro' influencers earn per sponsored post, and when they should consider hiring a manager.

China’s rate caution is conscious uncouplingThe central bank is holding lending benchmarks steady as global peers slash. Bad debts and capital flight risk make big fiscal and monetary moves more dangerous than in 2009. That pushes the burden for stimulus to the government. Either way, structural imbalances will get exacerbated. petesweeneypro China does not want to support zombie companies. Better to let bad debt slowly go bankrupt over time. Supporting it would only make the problem worse in the future.

Airbus says plants to reopen at slower production rateAirbus confirmed on Sunday it would resume only partial aircraft production when... A Boeing employee just dies and Airbus is about to re open 🤔

Airbus says plants to reopen at slower production rateAirbus confirmed on Sunday it would resume only partial aircraft production when...



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