Ask Amy: My son’s wife overheard what I said, but I’m not ready to apologize

Ask Amy: My son’s wife overheard what I said, but I’m not ready to apologize

1/24/2022 2:20:00 PM

Ask Amy: My son’s wife overheard what I said, but I’m not ready to apologize

She has always been hostile to me, and I want assurance she’ll accept my apology.

I also intend to apologize to her after I have been reassured that she will accept my apology. I intend to mention that I do not understand her coldness and hostility toward us.Upset MILYou should call your son and speak with him about this. Ask him to pass the phone to his wife. Your apology should be direct and sincere: “I am so sorry you overheard my harshness at Christmastime. I’ve been searching for ways to be closer to you, and this is definitely not the way to go about it. I’m very embarrassed and feel absolutely terrible about this. I hope you can forgive me.”

Read more: Mercury News »

‘The Silent Twins’ Producers Talk Merits Of Shooting The Un Certain Regard Entry In Poland — Cannes Panel

The producers of Cannes Un Certain Regard title The Silent Twins were on hand this weekend at the festival to talk about the benefits of shooting the project in Poland. Speaking at the American Pav… Read more >>

Ask Amy: Upset MIL might not foot wedding billIn today's Ask Amy, a mother-of-the-bride isn't happy with plans for her daughter's wedding.

Ask Amy: Favorite grandson is the main course at dinnerDear Amy: My grandmother is 91 and lives on her own. Her husband died a year ago. Although she has a few other grandchildren locally, I have always been her favorite because I was the first grandson. She's eating her grandkid?

Ask Amy: I’m prepared to put my foot down about this Catholic weddingAs soon as my daughter told me their plans, I said, ‘That can’t happen.’

Sundance Review: Amy Poehler Directs A Touching Documentary Portrait Of ‘Lucy And Desi’Apparently it is the season to celebrate the iconic marriage and professional relationship of Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz. Aaron Sorkin wrote and directed a penetrating, funny, revealing, and ultim… Great 👏

Sundance: Amy Poehler on What She Learned About Lucille Ball Directing Doc ‘Lucy and Desi’'I was very blown away by the way in which Lucy and Desi adapted their relationship to each other throughout their lives, and remained friends and partners until the end of their lives,' Poehler tells The Hollywood Reporter. seale15 they really loived each other, but in Desi's country of Cuba men took mistresses and thought nothing of it. Of course in this country it was a betrayal of his marriage and God knows how beautiful Lucy was, but she was not enough AmyPohler

Amy Schumer opens up about getting liposuction: 'I feel good'Amy Schumer shared an honest health update on Instagram and posted shoutouts to heath caregivers who helped treat her endometriosis. Sad, these people preach body positivity but then they turn around and they can afford to get surgery’s and cosmetics that others can’t and they conform to society’s outdated versions of “beautiful/healthy,” and it just makes everyone else feel bad about themselves.

Ask Amy: Is it rude to cover my mouth to thwart a lip-reader? The day before they were supposed to return home, my cup was full and some steam escaped in the form of harsh words to my son about her, which she overheard. Since then, I have written a long email to my son to apologize for my ugly words against the woman he loves. I also intend to apologize to her after I have been reassured that she will accept my apology. I intend to mention that I do not understand her coldness and hostility toward us. So far, my son has not replied; it’s been a week. Any advice on how to reconnect with them? Upset MIL Dear Upset: You should not wait for assurance that your apology will be accepted before offering one. Nor should you double down and place any blame on the person you’ve offended. You should call your son and speak with him about this. Ask him to pass the phone to his wife. Your apology should be direct and sincere: “I am so sorry you overheard my harshness at Christmastime. I’ve been searching for ways to be closer to you, and this is definitely not the way to go about it. I’m very embarrassed and feel absolutely terrible about this. I hope you can forgive me.” If you are unable to do this by phone, you should write directly to her. Dear Amy: I have a blessed life. My spouse and I have a wonderful relationship, I’m financially secure, and I enjoy going to work every day. While it may not be truly idyllic, it’s pretty close. One of my dear friend’s life is the complete opposite. He is still searching for that perfect someone. He hates his job but isn’t able to move, and his current finances are a mess. When he vents, I listen and give advice when asked. When he asks how I’m doing, my life is pretty positive, and while he says he’s happy for me, based on his non-verbal communication, I get a sense that I’m taking a screwdriver to his gut and am twisting it. How do I talk to my friend? Am I allowed to share news only when it’s negative? I don’t want to add salt to his wound, but that’s what it feels like when I share. Wondering Dear Wondering: First of all, I give your friend credit for actually asking about you! So often when people vent, they forget to show any interest in the person receiving the vent. You don’t need to hide your own blessings under a bushel, but I do think it is important to read the room. Ask your friend: “How does it feel for you when I share stories about my own good luck when things are going well? I do not want to add to your burdens in any way.” Related Articles