Artificial Photosynthesis Can Produce Food in Complete Darkness

6/26/2022 4:21:00 AM

Artificial Photosynthesis Can Produce Food in Complete Darkness

Artificial Photosynthesis Can Produce Food in Complete Darkness

Artificial photosynthesis is being developed by researchers to help make food production more energy-efficient on Earth, and maybe one day on Mars. For millions of years, photosynthesis has evolved in plants to turn water, carbon dioxide, and the energy from sunlight into plant biomass and the f

Artificial photosynthesis is being developed by researchers to help make food production more energy-efficient on Earth, and maybe one day onFor millions of years, photosynthesis has evolved in plants to turn water, carbon dioxide, and the energy from sunlight into plant biomass and the foods we eat. However, this process is very inefficient, with only around 1% of the energy found in sunlight ending up in the plant. Researchers at the University of California, Riverside and the University of Delaware have found a way to bypass the need for biological photosynthesis altogether and create food independent of sunlight by using artificial photosynthesis.

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University of California – Riverside June 25, 2022 Plants are growing in complete darkness in an acetate medium that replaces biological photosynthesis.Nature Food , used a two-step electrocatalytic process to convert carbon dioxide, electricity, and water into acetate, which is the main component in vinegar.CANNED HEAT: WHY LIBBIE MUGRABI’S COMPANY HAD TO CHANGE ITS NAME You’ve gotta admire ’s dedication.NEW YORK -- New York City health officials launched a new vaccination program Thursday to contain the spread of   as the number of cases in the city climbed to 30.

Credit: Marcus Harland-Dunaway/UCR Artificial photosynthesis is being developed by researchers to help make food production more energy-efficient on Earth, and maybe one day on Mars . For millions of years, photosynthesis has evolved in plants to turn water, carbon dioxide, and the energy from sunlight into plant biomass and the foods we eat. Their method could provide a much-needed food growth alternative in the face of a catastrophic climate crisis. However, this process is very inefficient, with only around 1% of the energy found in sunlight ending up in the plant.) The socialite had been using the brand’s former canned pineapple factory in Maui, Hawaii to produce her line of accessories under the label Libbielove , selling “Divorcée Glam” trucker hats for $125 a pop (a steal!). Researchers at the University of California, Riverside and the University of Delaware have found a way to bypass the need for biological photosynthesis altogether and create food independent of sunlight by using artificial photosynthesis. Interestingly, they say they can combine their method with solar panels to generate the electricity required to power the electrolysis. The new research, published on June 23, 2022, in the journal Nature Food , uses a two-step electrocatalytic process to convert carbon dioxide, electricity, and water into acetate, the form of the main component of vinegar. Kot said he was happy to see a strong turnout.

Food-producing organisms then consume acetate in the dark to grow. That means the method can use sunlight, though it is not reliant on the Sun's energy, and it can also function using other forms of electricity generation.” Hell hath no fury like a cannery scorned. Combined with solar panels to generate electricity to power the electrocatalysis, this hybrid organic-inorganic system could increase the conversion efficiency of sunlight into food, up to 18 times more efficient for some foods. “With our approach we sought to identify a new way of producing food that could break through the limits normally imposed by biological photosynthesis,” said corresponding author Robert Jinkerson, a UC Riverside assistant professor of chemical and environmental engineering. Advertisement During their research, the scientists discovered that a large variety of food could be produced in the dark using their method, including green algae, yeast, and fungal mycelium, which produces mushrooms. In order to integrate all the components of the system together, the output of the electrolyzer was optimized to support the growth of food-producing organisms. As it turns out, she settled the case out of court and ultimately agreed to change the name of her business. Electrolyzers are devices that use electricity to convert raw materials like carbon dioxide into useful molecules and products. "We were able to grow food-producing organisms without any contributions from biological photosynthesis. I think that lots of us had heard stories, maybe a friend of a friend who had gotten monkeypox, and it felt, there was a sense that if we didn't get the vaccine now, especially after we're going to see so many friends this weekend at Pride, that we would eventually get monkeypox,"  another person waiting for the vaccine told CBS2.

The amount of acetate produced was increased while the amount of salt used was decreased, resulting in the highest levels of acetate ever produced in an electrolyzer to date. “Using a state-of-the-art two-step tandem CO 2 electrolysis setup developed in our laboratory, we were able to achieve a high selectivity towards acetate that cannot be accessed through conventional CO 2 electrolysis routes,” said corresponding author Feng Jiao at University of Delaware. This technology is a more efficient method of turning   solar energy   into food, as compared to food production that relies on biological photosynthesis," said Elizabeth Hann, a doctoral candidate in the Jinkerson Lab and co-lead author of the study.K. Experiments showed that a wide range of food-producing organisms can be grown in the dark directly on the acetate-rich electrolyzer output, including green algae, yeast, and fungal mycelium that produce mushrooms. Producing algae with this technology is approximately fourfold more energy efficient than growing it photosynthetically. What's more, they found that crop plants, including cowpea, tomato, rice, green pea, and tobacco, all have the potential to be grown in the dark using the carbon from acetate. Yeast production is about 18-fold more energy efficient than how it is typically cultivated using sugar extracted from corn.” While I had her on the horn, I checked in to see if there were any updates on her bid to re-open her divorce suit with David Mugrabi, which she filed around this time last summer. "You know, we learned a lot with HIV about the pitfalls of stigmatizing groups based not on an identity but a behavior, and in this way, this is no different," Meacher said.

“We were able to grow food-producing organisms without any contributions from biological photosynthesis. The researchers believe that by reducing the reliance on direct sunlight, artificial photosynthesis could provide an important alternative for food growth in the coming years, as the world adapts to the — including droughts, floods, and reduced land availability. Typically, these organisms are cultivated on sugars derived from plants or inputs derived from petroleum—which is a product of biological photosynthesis that took place millions of years ago. This technology is a more efficient method of turning solar energy into food, as compared to food production that relies on biological photosynthesis,” said Elizabeth Hann, a doctoral candidate in the Jinkerson Lab and co-lead author of the study. By increasing the efficiency of food production, less land is needed, lessening the impact agriculture has on the environment. The potential for employing this technology to grow crop plants was also investigated. Cowpea, tomato, tobacco, rice, canola, and green pea were all able to utilize carbon from acetate when cultivated in the dark.  Advertisement NASA's Deep Space Food Challenge .

“We found that a wide range of crops could take the acetate we provided and build it into the major molecular building blocks an organism needs to grow and thrive. With some breeding and engineering that we are currently working on we might be able to grow crops with acetate as an extra energy source to boost crop yields,” said Marcus Harland-Dunaway, a doctoral candidate in the Jinkerson Lab and co-lead author of the study. By liberating agriculture from complete dependence on the sun, artificial photosynthesis opens the door to countless possibilities for growing food under the increasingly difficult conditions imposed by anthropogenic climate change. Drought, floods, and reduced land availability would be less of a threat to global food security if crops for humans and animals grew in less resource-intensive, controlled environments. Crops could also be grown in cities and other areas currently unsuitable for agriculture, and even provide food for future space explorers.

“Using artificial photosynthesis approaches to produce food could be a paradigm shift for how we feed people. By increasing the efficiency of food production, less land is needed, lessening the impact agriculture has on the environment. And for agriculture in non-traditional environments, like outer space, the increased energy efficiency could help feed more crew members with less inputs,” said Jinkerson. This approach to food production was submitted to NASA ’s Deep Space Food Challenge where it was a Phase I winner. The Deep Space Food Challenge is an international competition where prizes are awarded to teams to create novel and game-changing food technologies that require minimal inputs and maximize safe, nutritious, and palatable food outputs for long-duration space missions.

“Imagine someday giant vessels growing tomato plants in the dark and on Mars—how much easier would that be for future Martians?” said co-author Martha Orozco-Cárdenas, director of the UC Riverside Plant Transformation Research Center. Reference: “A hybrid inorganic–biological artificial photosynthesis system for energy-efficient food production” by Elizabeth C. Hann, Sean Overa, Marcus Harland-Dunaway, Andrés F. Narvaez, Dang N. Le, Martha L.

Orozco-Cárdenas, Feng Jiao and Robert E. Jinkerson, 23 June 2022, Nature Food DOI: 10.1038/s43016-022-00530-x Andres Narvaez, Dang Le, and Sean Overa also contributed to the research. The open-access paper is entitled “A hybrid inorganic–biological artificial photosynthesis system for energy-efficient food production.” The research was supported by the Translational Research Institute for Space Health (TRISH) through NASA (NNX16AO69A), Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR), the Link Foundation, the U.

S. National Science Foundation, and the U.S. Department of Energy. The content of this publication is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research.

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