“All Behavior is Communication:” The Discipline Approaches That Work for Real ADHD Families

The best discipline approach for a child with ADHD? It doesn’t exist — at least not in any universal, one-size-fits-all form. Caregivers’ most effective strategies are personal and changing and often honed from trial and error.

12/2/2021 5:01:00 PM

The best discipline approach for a child with ADHD? It doesn’t exist — at least not in any universal, one-size-fits-all form. Caregivers’ most effective strategies are personal and changing and often honed from trial and error.

The best discipline approach for a child with ADHD? It doesn’t exist — at least not in any universal, one-size-fits-all form. Caregivers’ most effective strategies are personal and changing and often honed from trial and error. Here, ADDitude readers share their families winning approaches to dealing with meltdowns and challenging behaviors.

, to notice the environment. Then discuss the issue.”– Laura, Canada“Our best strategy is to always review what is about to happen.We remind them of the rules right before an activity or outing, and what we are expecting in terms of behavior. We get a lot of ‘We know,’ but our reminders are helpful.”

– Ellen, Georgia“We ensure that basic needs are met first(hungry, thirsty, tired, hot or cold) and then communicate about the dysregulation that has occurred. We discuss feelings around it, and come up with a plan to address it (e.g. break up tough homework into smaller chunks, do clean up together, etc.).”

– Catherine, Canada“Kids with ADHD need immediate intervention. Delayed discipline methods don’t work for them.We give my son a look that says, ‘Stop.’ Then we explicitly tell him to stop. Then we have him go sit on a mat as a ‘time-out’ for several minutes. (We use a timer to keep track.) If he’s upset, we let him express his feelings and empathize with him. We don’t start the timer until he’s done expressing himself.” headtopics.com

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– Terri, Missouri“I try not to use ‘No!’ as my first response.Instead, I ask my child a question: ‘Is that your best choice?’ Or, ‘Have you thought of a different action?'”– Anna, Australia“The 1-2-3 approach works for us.We clearly state what we want (stop fighting, pick up a mess, quiet down) and state the consequence (you will lose your iPad time, etc), and we start the count slowly. It almost always works, usually by 1, because they cherish their iPad time.”

– Sarah, Australia“Discipline equals teaching, and I know from my classroom experience that the heat of the moment is NOT a good time to teach.When my child is acting out, my focus is on redirection and preventing escalation. Once my child is calm and able to think, we can figure out what triggered the behavior, and how to deal in the future. Eventually, this teaches my child how to independently deal with strong emotions or impulsive behaviors in a constructive way”

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“My ADHD Chaos Is Like a Naughty (Endearing) Puppy”“Chaos is an unruly puppy that adopted me when I was a kid… It’s always loud and annoying, and it keeps trying to hump or bite me every time I need a bit of rest… But I would honestly really miss Chaos if it ever completely departed my life. It’s been consistent and loyal to me in its own odd little way and I’ve slowly learned to love my Chaos.”

Study: Risk-Taking Behavior May Predict ADHD, ODD in ChildrenA new study suggests that young children who are motivated to approach an enticing source of stimulation (i.e. a stranger with candy) despite associated risks of dangers are more likely to exhibit school-age symptoms of ADHD and comorbid ODD, as well as callous-unemotional traits, according to a longitudinal study of roughly 200 preschool and school-age children. May I suggest less use of abbreviations in the articles? As someone with adhd, I struggle through reading the article with too many Adhd/odd, ic, cd etc coming in small paragraphs. Hope you take in to consideration. Thanks.

Study: Risk-Taking Behavior May Predict ADHD, ODD in ChildrenA new study suggests that young children who are motivated to approach an enticing source of stimulation (i.e. a stranger with candy) despite associated risks of dangers are more likely to exhibit school-age symptoms of ADHD and comorbid ODD, as well as callous-unemotional traits, according to a longitudinal study of roughly 200 preschool and school-age children. May I suggest less use of abbreviations in the articles? As someone with adhd, I struggle through reading the article with too many Adhd/odd, ic, cd etc coming in small paragraphs. Hope you take in to consideration. Thanks.

'My Son Can't Help It — So I Don't Punish Him'He shouts, he swears, he calls me names — but I know it’s his ADHD talking. That’s why, when my child misbehaves, I work hard to ignore it and remember that sometimes punishments for kids with ADHD are counterproductive.

From Bella Poarch To A ‘Bridgerton’ Musical, Meet Forbes’ 30 Under 30 In Social MediaFrom Bella Poarch To A ‘Bridgerton’ Musical, Meet Forbes’ 30 Under 30 In Social Media: ForbesUnder30 Woow massive congrats from me to you bellapoarch, i am really proud of you made into Forbes 30 under 30 list in social media, i knew that God will reward your sucseess, keep being down to earth swagapina girl that i love ☺️🤗😇🤩😍🥰🙌🙏

“My ADHD Chaos Is Like a Naughty (Endearing) Puppy”“Chaos is an unruly puppy that adopted me when I was a kid… It’s always loud and annoying, and it keeps trying to hump or bite me every time I need a bit of rest… But I would honestly really miss Chaos if it ever completely departed my life. It’s been consistent and loyal to me in its own odd little way and I’ve slowly learned to love my Chaos.”