A’s attendance woes reaching historic, embarrassing stage

5/23/2022 2:17:00 PM

A’s attendance woes reaching historic, embarrassing stage

A’s attendance woes reaching historic, embarrassing stage

It was revealed that only 1,452 fans showed up to one A’s game last month.

Those expansive, dark green tarps covering Mount Davis at the Coliseum do more than pay homage to the A’s glory days. They help hide part of the most unflattering story during the team’s five-plus decades in Oakland.It’s been so bad in Oakland that former team executive Andy Dolich found himself compelled to see firsthand what’s happened to the franchise he once helped transform from one with 326 season ticket holders in 1980 into the envy of baseball in the early 1990s.

Even saying the A’s are last in attendance among baseball’s 30 teams fails to properly illustrate the depth of their issues. But this may help: the A’s drew a paltry 13,884 fans throughout their just-completed three-game series against the Twins – and it was a nearly 30 percent improvement over their attendance from their previous three-game series.

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May 22, 2022 at 5:00 a.“Some say the world will end in fire,” goes a famous Robert Frost line.A man looks at air conditioners for sale at a P..

m. | UPDATED: May 23, 2022 at 4:53 a.” If ever poetry could explain the stock market, this may come closest to capturing the sour mood that’s about to deliver a seventh consecutive week of stock-market losses.m. (Richard Drew/AP) Customers are streaming into Zach Gaumond's hardware store in Falmouth searching for ways to keep cool. Those expansive, dark green tarps covering Mount Davis at the Coliseum do more than pay homage to the A’s glory days. But while there’s almost nowhere to hide when stagnation and inflation collide, this economic adjustment doesn’t feel like the start of a lingering illness. They help hide part of the most unflattering story during the team’s five-plus decades in Oakland.

Besides displaying the names and numbers of the A’s greatest players, the tarps exist to provide permanent cover for thousands of the ballpark’s empty seats. That hardly mitigates the pain of the last six months of stock-market SPX, +0. Temperatures were expected to hit the 90s over the weekend as Massachusetts experienced some of the hottest days of the year so far. But it would take a lot more of that vinyl mesh to mask the A’s current crisis-level attendance problems. There’s no secret why people aren’t showing up to their aging, dilapidated home.S. It’s A’s ownership dismantling a playoff-caliber roster in the name of future sustainability, while drastically raising season ticket prices amid an ongoing threat to move to Las Vegas, if it can’t get a new stadium at the Port of Oakland. In previous years, Gaumond would order half a dozen units in the late fall to have for early buying, with the intent of re-stocking depending on demand. To A’s fans, that’s three strikes — and all but the team’s most imperturbable followers are out. Recent price spikes in food and energy have already started to sour consumer sentiment, making the Fed’s task of price stabilization much easier to achieve.

It’s been so bad in Oakland that former team executive Andy Dolich found himself compelled to see firsthand what’s happened to the franchise he once helped transform from one with 326 season ticket holders in 1980 into the envy of baseball in the early 1990s. “A voice was calling. Disorientating These are clearly disorienting times. "What we've been doing is buying heavier early on," said Gaumond. I don’t know whose voice it was, other than it said I’ve got to go,” said Dolich, who may have wished he’d been sent to an Iowa cornfield last month rather than to a Tuesday night A’s game against Baltimore. As Dolich sat in the Coliseum among an intimate gathering of just 3,700 fans, he was consumed with pain and anger. Other than the 2008 financial crisis, which is already 14 years ago, the shivering prospects of recession have been relatively brief. “To see nobody there …,” he said as his voice trailed off. Hometown Ace Hardware in Gloucester also tried to order ahead as demand for air conditioners, fans, and wading pools has already risen.

“What we accomplished as an organization, to see that get washed away now in this Bermuda Triangle to wherever is gutwrenching. Should they use the Fed’s long-term inflation forecast of 2%, when they know their car just took $60 of gasoline? Can the Fed really ease growth to its projection 2.” Even saying the A’s are last in attendance among baseball’s 30 teams fails to properly illustrate the depth of their issues. But this may help: the A’s drew a paltry 13,884 fans throughout their just-completed three-game series against the Twins – and it was a nearly 30 percent improvement over their attendance from their previous three-game series.9% for next year executing what Chair Jerome Powell now calls a “softish landing."So when we get opportunity, we just buy more that we have. So far, nearly half of the A’s 20 home games have had crowds of fewer than 5,000 fans. Their tiniest crowd was shameful – the A’s drew a major-league low 2,488 fans earlier this month against Tampa Bay. Meanwhile, uncertainty around both sets of numbers means it’s hard to tell what’s cheap.

It was their smallest Coliseum crowd in 43 years but, because MLB uses tickets sold rather than tickets used for its attendance figures, the true numbers from their 6-1 loss on May 2 were even uglier. Wheatley said air conditioner units are roughly $30 to $50 more expensive at his store this year compared to 2021. A Coliseum source told this news organization there were actually only 1,452 fans at the stadium during the A’s game on May 2. Today, investors aren’t sure stocks are bargains now that the S&P 500 multiples are now in the high teens. That 1,452 number is even more stunning when considering nearly twice as many fans showed up the next night in Stockton for the A’s Low-A affiliate’s home game. Dolich, a former president for business operations and marketing for the A’s, doesn’t blame fans for the turmoil at the turnstiles. First, U. "We're buying large quantities right now so that in June or July, when the next heat wave comes, we'll have inventory," Wheatley said,"because by then the distributors might be out. He said many of the team’s issues lead back to reclusive A’s owner John Fisher.

“This is all self-inflicted. consumer price inflation seems to have peaked last week, even if wage pressures still need watching. To me, he doesn’t represent what an owner should be about in sports now,” Dolich said. Related:. “Has anyone ever heard from him? He’s owned the team for 17 years now and it’s his prerogative not to speak on behalf of the organization, and to have Lew (Wolff) and now (president) Dave (Kaval) speak for him. Third, and most important, long-term rates are holding steady even as short rates rise, suggesting markets believe the Fed will succeed in stabilizing prices. “But even though franchises are privately held organizations, they are public trusts. The fanbase is paying good money for seats, suites, parking, brats and beer.S.

You should be communicating with them. “I do find (Fisher’s silence) somewhat problematic because he’s in such a significant position. Amid the dark headlines, it’s easy to forget that unemployment has reached near-historic lows and workers quitting their jobs in search of something better near historic highs. You may be the last team that leaves a marketplace where all three pro sports teams will have left Oakland, never to return in our lifetime.” It wasn’t always like this in Oakland. Plenty of risks Just how much damage is done as the economy “downshifts” is hard to predict. In 1990, the A’s had the second-highest attendance in the American League (a franchise-record 2.

9 million fans) and the following year they even had the highest payroll in baseball ($33 million).” Loan defaults will have to rise from their own historically low levels. Who knew the Coliseum was once a destination place? Dolich looks at the A’s current marketing efforts and just shakes his head. He sees a confusing ticket campaign that began charging their most loyal customers, season ticket holders, nearly double what they paid a year ago. Meanwhile, there are plenty of risks beyond American shores that could weigh on the U. Then there’s the problematic $30 parking price. Then, to spark fan interest recently, the team has undercut those season ticket holders by offering dirt cheap entrance into the park. economy.

“Any time your parking is five times what a ticket price is, you know that there’s no strategy involved,” Dolich said. “Any basic marketer in whatever product your offering knows this. Food-importing countries face much higher prices for wheat and fertilizer, too. There’s so many deals available to the customer now that they get confused. A’s tickets are two-for-$10 or $5.9% last month threatening further disruption to global supply chains.10, it’s this price on a Wednesday, this price on a weekend.

“The A’s are offering deals that are destroying the credibility of their product and it hurts that core group of fans.S.” As it stands, the A’s are drawing a major league-worst 8,165 fans per game and are on pace to draw just 661,365 fans this season, which would rival the worst attendance by any MLB team over the past 50 years. Business hasn’t been this bleak for the A’s since their 1979 team attracted the fewest fans of any MLB team in nearly 70 years — a shockingly low 306,000 fans came to the Coliseum that year. The irony is that the relatively sharp price shocks from supply-chain disruptions and commodity price spikes make it more likely that red-hot demand will cool on its own. “Clearly to me, as an emotional observer, someone who spent 14 years trying to build the brand in Oakland, this is your fans telling you how they feel by not buying your product,” Dolich said. A’s pitcher Paul Blackburn, who used to come to games at the Coliseum as a youngster growing up in Oakley, is sympathetic to what Oakland fans are feeling. There may be more fire and there may be more ice.

“I guess seeing it from a fan’s perspective, and I’m kind of speaking from the heart a little bit, I understand it’s tough,” Blackburn said recently. “We’ve had a lot of great players over the last four to five years when I’ve been here and to see those guys leave from a fan perspective, I get it. Christopher Smart is chief global strategist and head of the Barings Investment Institute.” To be fair, the A’s have a valid claim that their crumbling and unattractive, 56-year-old stadium is quite a deterrent to fans as well as the team’s future. “The (new) ballpark is the key to having a larger payroll so we can compete more effectively with bigger market clubs, have a better fan experience and retain players,” Kaval recently told this organization. Now read: S&P 500 earnings are another potential ‘shock’ awaiting financial markets trying to shake off stagflation fears: economist Plus: When is it safe to start buying stocks again? We’re not there yet, but these are the six signs to look for. The A’s and their fans will have an answer to the viability of a new stadium at Howard Terminal on June 30.

That’s when the San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission votes whether or not to approve the A’s request to use 56 acres of port-designed property for their $12 billion ballpark project. Interestingly enough, Fisher and the A’s may have already received a sign that much better days are ahead. To believe that though, you’d also have to believe in divine intervention. It turns out the 1,452 fans who made their way into the Coliseum last month may have accomplished more than setting a record for attendance futility. Together, those 1,452 might have delivered an omen.

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