A Brilliant NASA Scientist Who Enhanced Astronaut Health, John B. Charles, Has Died

He was 66.

Nasa, John B. Charles

1/19/2022 8:59:00 PM

He was 66.

A brilliant NASA scientist has died at 66 years old! While he'll be missed, his contribution to astronaut operations, training, and more, were grand.

John B. Charles, NASA's former chief scientist for the agency's human research program, has died, according toa Wednesday tweet from Vanessa Wyche, director of the agency's Johnson Space Center."He served for 33 years at NASA, retiring as chief scientist for the Human Research Program @NASA_Johnson," read the tweet. Charles leaves behind a legacy of deeply moving accomplishments, transforming spaceflight training and improving the well-being of astronauts during missions, and much more.

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John B. Charles, NASA's former chief scientist for the agency's human research program, has died, according to a Wednesday tweet from Vanessa Wyche , director of the agency's Johnson Space Center. “I don’t need to have a new wardrobe,” he’ll tell his friends. "He served for 33 years at NASA, retiring as chief scientist for the Human Research Program @NASA_Johnson," read the tweet. Harris averaged 25. Charles leaves behind a legacy of deeply moving accomplishments, transforming spaceflight training and improving the well-being of astronauts during missions, and much more.” Then they invariably ask, “‘What do you do? You look like you could run. He was 66.” Harris, who died in her native Mississippi, was drafted by the New Orleans Jazz in the seventh round in 1977, but didn’t try out for the team because she was pregnant at the time.

John B. “That’s definitely a young man’s game,” Moses said. She's still the school's all-time leader in scoring (2,981 points) and rebounding (1,662). Charles advanced research for long-term space missions Years before his death, he retired from NASA in 2018 after 35 years of crucial research. While at the Johnson Space Center, he spent much of his lab career examining the issue of orthostatic intolerance, which is a feeling of faintness that astronauts get upon returning to the Earth after an orbital flight. “That’s just my thing,” he said, “like a seamstress can always sew. Charles and his research team helped to create a postflight test of orthostatic function, inventing a way to lower what's called lower body negative pressure (LBNP) and restore bodily fluid balance throughout the body by drinking water with salt tablets. women’s team in 1975. But for Charles, the high-point of his career came earlier:"I have to rate as one of the highest the chance to work with John Glenn, because he inspired me way back in 1962 to be interested in spaceflight," said Charles in a NASA blog post , when he retired. He won the Olympic gold medal in 1976, likely would have captured another in 1980 if not for the U.

  "Then 36 years later, when he flew on the shuttle, I dealt with him on a fairly regular basis to prepare our experiments for him to do in flight," added Charles."It was always a thrill for me to see and speak to him.-led boycott and then was victorious again in 1984. Copyright AP - Associated Press. It was sort of a full circle, going from being inspired by him to working with him and having him consider me a part of his team." While Chief Scientist at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Charles also focused on the One-Year Mission, where Russian Cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko and Astronaut Scott Kelly (ISS) — to enhance research of medical, psychological, and biomedical sciences for long-term missions. He also put together one of the most formidable streaks in sports history. A lifetime of service to NASA's human space flight Charles was"not only a towering (metaphorically and literally) figure at JSC life sci, but a serious spae history geek," said Jonathan McDowell, an astronomer at Harvard's Center for Astrophysics, .